Agile Software Development: It's Not the Wild West

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Work Horse
The work horse has learned about Agile by trying to implement it on their own or with some help from others. They understand the structure that Agile needs to thrive, by either being bitten once already or by fully understanding the environment needed for Agile. These may be folks in the trenches who really understand the challenges of implementing Agile because their merit or bonus is tied to their success. This group cannot afford to be idealists, but are realists that learn the hard way when a new Agile culture collides with current company culture. They learn the importance of facilitating change and adapting. A lot can be learned from this group.

Bandwagon Enthusiast
The bandwagon enthusiast sees benefit in jumping on the Agile train. Fads and trends rule the day so if Agile is "hot", then there will be folks who pretend to be enthusiasts. They "throw around" Agile terminology to give the appearance of knowing the field. The danger is that they pretend to know Agile well while not really understanding it and what it needs to thrive. Therefore inaccurate information is often disseminated without any bad intend (but it is incorrect information all the same). Some bandwagon enthusiasts will see the value of Agile and will become Agile work horses or champions - most will not.

Deceiver
The deceiver sees the Agile trend as an opportunity to abandon processes and documentation so that they can enjoy the wild west life. When reviewing the Agile Manifesto (see http://agilemanifesto.org/ ), they interpret the word "over" as "in place of". These are individuals are smart enough to know that many do not understand Agile. They deliberately twist the true intent of the manifesto. For example when the Agile Manifesto says:

  • "Individuals and interactions over processes and tools"

Deceivers will re-interpreted it as

  • "Individuals and interactions in place of processes and tools".

Agile values process, tools, documentation, negotiation, and planning. However, these concepts are viewed differently in the Agile world. Deceivers are the most dangerous because they undermine and obstruct the potential

About the author

Mario  Moreira's picture Mario Moreira

Mario Moreira is a Columnist for the CM Journal, a writer for the Agile Journal, an Author, an Agile and CM expert for CA, and has worked in the CM field since 1986 and in the Agile field since 1998. He has experience with numerous CM technologies and processes and has implemented CM on over 150 applications/products, which include establishing global SCM infrastructures. He is a certified ScrumMaster in the Agile arena having implemented Scrum and XP practices. He holds an MA in Mass Communication with an emphasis on communication technologies. Mario also brings years of Project Management, Software Quality Assurance, Requirement Management, facilitation, and team building skills and experience. Mario is the author of a new book entitled “Adapting Configuration Management for Agile Teams” (via Wiley Publishing). It provides an Agile Primer and a CM Primer, and how to adapt CM practices for Agile Teams. Mario is also the author of the CM book entitled, “Software Configuration Management Implementation Roadmap.” It includes step-by-step guidance for implementing SCM at the organization, application, and project level with numerous examples. Also consider visiting Mario’s blog on CM for Agile and Agile adoption at http://cmforagile.blogspot.com/.
 

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