Introduction of Automated Test to a Project

[article]
Summary:

In an attempt to do more with less, organizations want to test their software adequately, but as quickly as possible. Faced with this reality, software managers and developers have little choice but to introduce automated testing to their projects....The introduction of automated test tools helps to replace archaic and mundane manual test processes with a more professional and repeatable automated test environment, that promotes test engineer retention and improves test engineer morale.

This article appeared in Methods & Tools, Summer 1999 (pp. 11-15), available at www.autotestco.com. The text originally appeared in and is adapted from Automated Software Testing (sections of chapter 4), copyright AWL, all rights reserved, ISBN 0-20-43287.

At the start, a new candidate for (a) paradigm (change) may have few supporters, and on occasions the supporters' motives may be suspect. Nevertheless, if they are competent, they will improve it, explore its possibilities, and show what it would be like to belong to the community guided by it. And as that goes on, if the paradigm is one destined to win its fight, the number and strength of the persuasive arguments in its favor will increase. (Thomas Kuhn, "The Structure of Scientific Revolution")

Introduction
Today's software managers and developers are being asked to turn around their products within ever-shrinking schedules and with minimal resources. This is due to a push from federal government and commercial industry toward streamlining the product acquisition life cycle as well as the survival necessity within the commercial software product industry of getting a product to market early.

In an attempt to do more with less, organizations want to test their software adequately, but as quickly as possible. Faced with this reality, software managers and developers have little choice but to introduce automated testing to their projects. While needing to introduce automated testing, software professionals may not know what's involved in introducing an automated test tool to a software project, and may not be familiar with the breadth of application that automated test tools have today.

Manual testing is labor intensive and error prone, and does not support the same kind of quality checks that are possible through the use of an automated test tool. Humans make mistakes, especially when mundane, repetitive tasks are involved. Computers are especially effective in performing these mundane and repetitious tasks, without the mistakes. The introduction of automated test tools helps to replace archaic and mundane manual test processes with a more professional and repeatable automated test environment, that promotes test engineer retention and improves test engineer morale.

Introducing Automated Test
Yet, a new technology is often met with skepticism and software test automation is no exception. How test teams introduce an automated software test tool on a new project is nearly as important as the selection of the most appropriate test tool for the project. A tool is only as good as the process being used to implement the tool.

Over the last several years test teams have largely implemented automated testing tools on projects, without having a process or strategy in place describing in detail the steps involved in using the test tool productively.

This approach commonly results in the development of test scripts that are not reusable, meaning that the test script serves a single test string but cannot be applied to a subsequent release of the software application. In the case of incremental software builds and as a result of software changes, these test scripts need to be recreated repeatedly and must be adjusted multiple times to accommodate minor software changes. This approach increases the testing effort and brings subsequent schedule increases and cost overruns.

Perhaps the most dreaded consequence of an unstructured test program is the need for extending the period of actual testing. Test efforts that drag out unexpectedly tend to receive a significant amount of criticism and unwanted management attention. Unplanned extensions to the test schedule may have several undesirable consequences to the organization, including loss of product market share or loss of customer or client confidence and satisfaction with the product.

On other occasions, the test team may attempt to implement a test tool too late in the development life cycle to adequately accommodate the test team’s learning curve for the test tool. The test team may find that the time

Pages

About the author

TechWell Contributor's picture TechWell Contributor

The opinions and positions expressed within these guest posts are those of the author alone and do not represent those of the TechWell Community Sites. Guest authors represent that they have the right to distribute this content and that such content is not violating the legal rights of others. If you would like to contribute content to a TechWell Community Site, email editors@techwell.com.

AgileConnection is one of the growing communities of the TechWell network.

Featuring fresh, insightful stories, TechWell.com is the place to go for what is happening in software development and delivery.  Join the conversation now!

Upcoming Events

Sep 22
Sep 24
Oct 12
Nov 09