Planning Projects for Enterprise CM

[article]

Based

 

 

Batch Compilation

 

File Transfer for Deployment

 

GJX C/C++

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

MacroBlur COBOL

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

WebCube

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes*

 

Marginify*

 

No

 

No

 

No

 

WebCube deployment: some issues need to be worked out with J2EE deployments to multiple servers – must compile a separate EAR for each of 15 servers running the same app.

Marginify:  Puts everything in one giant file (too big for version control).  Must rebuild changes via a GUI on production machine (not controllable, can’t automate, and violates audit requirements).

Many of the “gotchas” will be unique to your organization – conflicts with or requesting process changes from other groups, etc.

Project Plans
Now that you’ve planned for your project you need a project plan, or project plans, as it will actually be. What you should be aiming for is developing a project plan template that you can apply individually to each application team.  What you put in the plan is up to you and according to your goals, but items like “source code validation” and “deployment design” are general enough for most applications, but is a specific enough milestone to identify progress and dependencies. You may develop a further, detailed task list that would contain specific items relevant only for the application at hand – “Identify compile flags for the Read1 compiler as used by developers.”

Pilot Selection
As you delve into your project plan templates, begin searching for pilot applications (pilots, not Guinea pigs I hope). You may be able to identify different categories of applications, such as a bunch of WebSphere applications with AIX production environments, and another set running Visual Basic and Visual C++ on Windows.  It is a good idea to pick a pilot from each category in order to be able to identify the entire scope for the enterprise project.

Also, do not pick your most complex applications for pilots – it is important to achieve some early measure of success to bring confidence to the participants and to aid in bringing operational support on line.  A large, complex application could take years to meet all of its milestones.  What makes an application large and complex?  Large numbers.  Large numbers of anything – people, configuration items, different development tools, different production environments, different geographic areas where development is taking place.  Sometimes “large” can mean just 2 or 3.

Progress Scorecard
Pick a few high-level milestones that you can track with a “scorecard.” With the large number of fairly technical tasks involved, this can be an effective way to communicate progress to management. The scorecard will have “These applications have achieved X,” and “These applications have achieved X and Y,” and “These applications have achieved X and Z, but not Y.”

Application

 

Centralized Version Control

 

Build Control

 

Deployment Control

 

AutoPolicy

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Treasury

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes*

 

FireArms

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

No (target 5/27)

 

Treasury:  Developers still have production passwords until 5 successful deployments have been made with the new system.

FireArms: Waiting for UNIX systems to standardize production environment.

Management may wish to set priorities for some milestones over others. Your project plan template should not be too detailed either as tasks required to meet certain milestones are likely to vary widely between application teams that have different development tools, release cycles, people...

Another word on dates – dates are still important and should be a part of your scorecard.  You will likely have to keep after applications you are working

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