Soft Skills that Make a Tester

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Summary:

If statistics are to be believed, software technology changes everyday for the better. There is always a quest to learn new technologies, languages, and methodologies among testers. In such a dynamic environment, often the importance of soft skills is overlooked. This article explores the impact and importance of soft skills in software testing.

Importance of Soft Skills
Broadly speaking, we can view software testers as having two kinds of skills: one set used to perform basic duties at work, and another set of skills used to approach work. The former can be categorized as technical skills and the latter as soft skills. To elaborate more on soft skills, these are the ones that define one's approach towards work, life, problems, etc. Soft skills are people skills. The best part about mastering them is that the application of these skills is not limited to one's profession, but their scope reaches all aspects of life. Technical skills may teach one how to meet the expectations of the job, but soft skills teach one to succeed, and to exceed expectations. It is surprising that we spend our time educating almost exclusively in technical skills.

Having said so much in favor of soft skills, my intention is never to undermine the importance of technical skills. It's nearly impossible for a tester to survive in the profession without sound technical skills. What I intend to challenge here is a popular myth: Technical skills, and only technical skills make a tester a complete professional . I firmly believe that both technical and soft skills compliment each other and the balance between these two is what makes a tester a complete professional. Now, let's have a look at the various soft skills that make up a successful software tester.

Discipline and Perseverance
One obvious aspect of testing is that it can be extremely repetitive and may require a lot of manual effort. Consider the following situations:

  • A tester is struck with a bug that is not reproducible at all the instances. In order to reproduce the bug he goes through the whole series of steps again and again.
  • As part of a daily routine, a tester has been asked to collect data about test cases executed, bugs logged, etc.
  • After discovering a defect, a tester is supposed to write steps to recreate the defect.

There can be numerous examples that prove the reiterative nature of the job. A very predictable reaction to this repetition is to simply get tired of the job. But soft skills include the psychological tools to persevere, and to find ways to make effort more productive and interesting. This attitude difference helps a tester maintain focus and higher levels of quality work. It brings the ability to carry out task at hand in spite of difficulty.

Reading Skills
It may seem odd to classify reading as a skill. But its importance becomes more obvious when we have to deal with large chunks of information every day. As testers, we routinely encounter large quantities of data to read and comprehend. At the requirements review stage, when testers have to review hundreds of pages of requirements, the application of reading as a skill makes a big difference.

Consider this fact about reading: An average person reads at the speed of about 200-250 words per minute. With the structured and scientific approach to reading, the reading speed can be more than 500 words per minute, and with improved retention and concentration. Correlating this with software testing, a requirements specification that would otherwise take a tester eight hours to read and comprehend, would take around four hours with improved reading.

Negative Thinking
Negative thinking can be the useful ally of a tester if it is applied at the right time. For a new product, a tester is working to create a QA plan or a master test plan. While mentioning the risks involved in the project, a tester has to

About the author

Anuj Magazine's picture Anuj Magazine

Anuj Magazine is a Software Testing and General Management professional at Citrix Inc. Anuj likes to explore new avenues/sciences and their intersections with software engineering and dreams of creating a Medici Effect for Software Testing. He has been a regular conference speaker and writes frequently on diverse topics like software testing, management, sports, and handwriting analysis. Anuj runs ASM, a non-profit organization that contributes to society by counseling and mentoring people using the science of handwriting analysis. He is a regular contributor at Techwell.com (http://www.techwell.com/users/anuj-magazine) and blogs at http://anujmagazine.blogspot.in and http://thehandwritinganalyst.blogspot.in.

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