Story Mapping the Wrong Way

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Summary:

When Lisa Crispin’s team got an opportunity to put the story mapping ideas she picked up from Jeff Patton into practice, they excitedly rushed into it and missed a few steps. Find out what happened, what didn't happen, and what they learned from it all.

During the past few years, I’ve participated in a couple of workshops and talks by Jeff Patton where I learned about story mapping. This is a hands-on way to model a theme or project and slice it into user stories. Jeff first wrote about it in a January 2005 Better Software article, “How You Slice It.”

What I learned from Jeff is to start by gathering your development team and business stakeholders. Create personas to represent your various types and roles of users, then think about how each persona would use your system or feature. What would they do first? What would they do next? Make a timeline of user activities using index cards on a wall, a table, or a floor. Then, go back and look at each user activity in detail and create user tasks and details about those tasks, which will eventually become user stories. Write those on cards, too, and stack them vertically under the corresponding user activity.

Once the story map is in place, you can slice them into user stories and plan which ones go into each iteration and release. You should walk the story map with stakeholders and see if you can think of any other details or issues. The story map helps you think about the value the system delivers.

Eager to Try It
Like most teams I know, our team struggles with getting the right level of detail on requirements for each user story before we start testing and coding. We don’t want big design up front, but we don’t want to waste a bunch of time going back and forth to the product owner and other business experts to nail down specifications during development. Brainstorming techniques such as mind mapping have helped us, but we still feel we lose too much time with requirements churn.

I’ve been agitating for some time to try story mapping and see if it might help us flesh out details about a theme and its user stories in advance of coding. I was pleased one recent afternoon when our ScrumMaster told me, “We want to story map the ‘We Help You Choose’ theme tomorrow.”

I was thrilled to finally get my wish, but I was also swamped. I was leaving for Agile Testing Days in Potsdam in a couple days, and we were in the middle of a difficult and busy sprint. I didn’t have time to go back and study up on exactly how to do story mapping. I thought I could wing it. (Cue shark attack music.)

One thing I understood about story mapping is that all stakeholders need to participate. We’re often missing important stakeholders in our brainstorming and estimating meetings, so I insisted that all stakeholders for this theme must be present for our story mapping session. In this case, that was only one person, but many themes we do involve multiple stakeholders.

About the author

Lisa Crispin's picture Lisa Crispin

Lisa Crispin is the co-author, with Janet Gregory, of Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (Addison-Wesley, 2009), co-author with Tip House of Extreme Testing (Addison-Wesley, 2002) and a contributor to Beautiful Testing (O’Reilly, 2009) and Experiences of Test Automation by Dorothy Graham and Mark Fewster (Addison-Wesley, 2011). She has worked as a tester on agile teamssince 2000, and enjoys sharing her experiences via writing, presenting, teaching and participating in agile testing communities around the world. Lisa was named one of the 13 Women of Influence in testing by Software Test & Performance magazine in 2009. For more about Lisa’s work, visit www.lisacrispin.com.

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