Better Software Magazine Archive: October 2008

IN THIS ISSUE

The Tester Who Came In from the Cold
By Lisa Crispin

Traditionally, relationships between testing and coding teams often bordered on frosty. But the wall has started to come down, especially in organizations that have embraced agile principles, values, and practices.

A Gram of Prevention
By Chuck Allison

Following an "I-click-therefore-I-Program" methodology does not lead to quality software. Good code can and should evolve from clear, up-front descriptions of the solution to the problem at hand.

Google Web Toolkit
By Daniel Wellman

The Google Web Toolkit (GWT) is a tool designed to aid Ajax developers. GWT compiles Java source code into browser-friendly JavaScript and has many features that let you focus on writing your application instead of worrying about browser compatibility problems.

Held Hostage
By Linda Hayes

Software developers are not typically at the top of the organizational chart. Yet in some cases, developers are able to wield their knowledge and control of the code to hold management hostage to the developers’ own agenda. How can you avoid being taken hostage and losing control of your company and its software?

The One-Hour Regression Test
By Steven Woody

If a customer asked you to demonstrate to him, within an hour, that your newest software is ready for use, what tests would you run? Are these the same tests that you are now performing in your first hour of regression testing? They should be.

Tale of a Yo-Yo Manager
By Esther Derby

There is much more to empowering your team than simply stating "You're empowered." Consider the three Ws of empowerment: "what," "when," and "why" when creating boundaries that define which decisions are the team's and which need management approval.

Got You Covered
By Michael Bolton

Excellent testing starts by questioning the mission. So, the first step when we are seeking to evaluate or enhance the quality of our test coverage is to determine for whom or what we're determining coverage.

Passing the Buck
By Allen I. Holub

One way object-oriented systems address the maintenance problem is by using "implementation hiding." Clients of an object shouldn't be dependent on its inner workings--they should only have to know how to talk to it.

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