Books Guide: Managing Software Projects & Teams

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Managing Software Projects & Teams

Agile Hiring
By:
Sean Landis
Published:
2011

This book presents a fresh approach that is tested by fire: developed by the author in over twenty years of experience hiring software professionals at both small companies and large. Drawing on principles from the "agile" software development movement, this book offers a different way to think about hiring.

Exploring Scrum: The Fundamentals (People, Product, and Practices)
By:
Dan Rawsthorne, Doug Shimp
Published:
2011

Are you a software developer? Do you manage software developers? Are you using scrum? Are you thinking of using scrum? Then you must have this book!

Scrum is the most popular agile software development process in use today, but implementing it has proven difficult for many people. Dan and Doug wrote this book in order to help people with their implementations of Scrum.

Improving Your Project Management Skills
By:
Larry Richman
Published:
2011

If a full-fledged project management course doesn't fit your schedule or your budget, check out the new edition of 'Improving Your Project Management Skills". Based on the hugely popular American Management Association seminar of the same name, this ultrapractical reference offers powerful and repeatable project initiatives that improve processes, streamline productivity, and cut costs dramatically.

Individuals and Interactions: An Agile Guide
By:
Ken Howard, Barry Rogers
Published:
2011

Great emphasis is typically placed on the “mechanics” of agile development--its processes and tools. It’s easy to forget that the Agile Manifesto values individuals and interactions ahead of processes and tools. You can gain powerful benefits by refocusing on the people side of agile development. This book will show you how. 

Leadership, Teamwork, and Trust: Building a Competitive Software Capability
By:
Watts S. Humphrey, James W. Over
Published:
2011

Leadership, Teamwork, and Trust discusses the critical importance of knowledge work to the success of modern organizations. It explains concrete and necessary steps for reshaping the way in which software development, specifically, is conducted.

Managing Projects in Trouble: Achieving Turnaround and Success
By:
Ralph Kliem
Published:
2011

Based on the lessons learned by the author during a quarter of a century of leading projects to successful conclusions, Managing Projects in Trouble: Achieving Turnaround and Success unveils the five secrets to ensuring success—even for projects seemingly doomed to fail.

Scalability Rules
By:
Martin L. Abbott, Michael T. Fisher
Published:
2011

Scalability Rules is the easy-to-use scalability primer and reference for every architect, developer, web professional, and manager. Authors Martin L. Abbott and Michael T. Fisher have helped scale more than 200 hypergrowth Internet sites through their consulting practice. Now, drawing on their unsurpassed experience, they present 50 clear, proven scalability rules–and practical guidance for applying them.

Software Development and Professional Practice
By:
John Dooley
Published:
2011

Software Development and Professional Practice reveals how to design and code great software. What factors do you take into account? What makes a good design? What methods and processes are out there for designing software? Is designing small programs different than designing large ones? How can you tell a good design from a bad one? You'll learn the principles of good software design, and how to turn those principles back into great code.

Software Maintenance Success Recipes
By:
Donald Reifer
Published:
2011

Dispelling much of the folklore surrounding software maintenance, Software Maintenance Success Recipes identifies actionable formulas for success based on in-depth analysis of more than 200 real-world maintenance projects. It details the set of factors that are usually present when effective software maintenance teams do their work and instructs on the methods required to achieve success.

Succeeding in the Project Management Jungle
By:
Doug Russell
Published:
2011

It's a jungle out there and project managers are fighting to survive! With countless man-hours clocked and billions of dollars spent every year on project tools, the success rate for projects remains astonishingly low. So what's the solution? Introducing TACTILE Management[trademark], a people-centric system that works in conjunction with an organization's existing processes.

The Clean Coder
By:
Robert C. Martin
Published:
2011

Programmers who endure and succeed amidst swirling uncertainty and nonstop pressure share a common attribute: They care deeply about the practice of creating software. They treat it as a craft. They are professionals.

The Dark Side of Software Engineering: Evil on Computing Projects
By:
Robert L. Glass, Johann Rost
Published:
2011

This is not a book about software project failure, or about prescriptive thinking about how to build software better. This is a book about the evil things that happen on computing and software projects—what the kinds of evil are, how they manifest themselves, and what the good guys can do about them.

The Elements of Scrum
By:
Hillary Louise Johnson, Chris Sims
Published:
2011

A practical field guide to the practice of scrum, an agile software project management methodology.

User Experience Management
By:
Arnie Lund
Published:
2011

The role of UX manager is of vital importance–it means leading a productive team, influencing businesses to adopt user-centered design, and delivering valuable products customers. Few UX professionals who find themselves in management positions have formal training in management. More often than not they are promoted to a management position after having proven themselves as an effective and successful practitioner.

101 Project Management Problems and How to Solve Them
By:
Tom Kendrick
Published:
2010

Even with a terrific project management program in place, problems can arise to derail your team’s hard work. The last thing you need in the heat of battle is academic theory. You need field-proven fixes, practical answers to urgent questions, and simple strategies for navigating around obstacles. 101 Project Management Problems and How to Solve Them explores a wide range of these real-world challenges, including how to:

A Practical Guide to Distributed Scrum
By:
Elizabeth Woodward, et al.
Published:
2010

This is the first comprehensive, practical guide for Scrum practitioners working in large-scale distributed environments. Written by three of IBM’s leading Scrum practitioners—in close collaboration with the IBM QSE Scrum Community of more than 1000 members worldwide—this book offers specific, actionable guidance for everyone who wants to succeed with Scrum in the enterprise.

Adaptive Project Framework
By:
Robert K. Wysocki
Published:
2010

For an increasing number of critical projects, traditional project management models simply are not appropriate. In many cases, complete requirements and objectives cannot be specified up front, and significant changes cannot be avoided. What's needed is an entirely new framework for project management: one that combines agile methods with the profession’s most enduring best practices. In this book, Robert K.

Agile Development & Business Goals: The Six Week Solution
By:
Bill Holtsnider, et al.
Published:
2010

Agile Development and Business Goals describes a unique, state-of-the-art methodology that aligns the critical but often "silo-ed" software development process with core company goals. Eschewing long-winded "agile philosophy" in favor of a formally prioritized process, this book serves as a distilled learning guide for managing technical resources in a manner that directly boosts your bottom line.

Agile Excellence for Product Managers
By:
Greg Cohen
Published:
2010

Organizations are constantly struggling with complex development projects and are in search for a few, straightforward, and easy to learn methods to help deal with their problems. For this reason, more and more software companies are rapidly turning to Agile development to cope with fast changing markets, unknown or changing product requirements, borderless competition, and to solve complex problems.

Agile Game Development with Scrum
By:
Clinton Keith
Published:
2010

Game development is in crisis—facing bloated budgets, impossible schedules, unmanageable complexity, and death march overtime. It’s no wonder so many development studios are struggling to survive. Fortunately, there is a solution. Scrum and Agile methods are already revolutionizing development outside the game industry. Now, long-time game developer Clinton Keith shows exactly how to successfully apply these methods to the unique challenges of game development.

Agile Product Management with Scrum
By:
Roman Pichler
Published:
2010

In "Agile Product Management with Scrum," leading Scrum consultant Roman Pichler uses real-world examples to demonstrate how product owners can create successful products with Scrum. He describes a broad range of agile product management practices, including making agile product discovery work, taking advantage of emergent requirements, creating the minimal marketable product, leveraging early customer feedback, and working closely with the development team.

Agile Software Development with Distributed Teams
By:
Jutta Eckstein
Published:
2010

All software projects face the challenges of diverse distances -- temporal, geographical, cultural, lingual, political, historical, and more. Many forms of distance even affect developers in the same room. The goal of this book is to reconcile two mainstays of modern agility: the close collaboration agility relies on, and project teams distributed across different cities, countries, and continents.

Coaching Agile Teams: A Companion for ScrumMasters, Agile Coaches, and Project Managers in Transition
By:
Lyssa Adkins
Published:
2010

As an agile coach, you can help project teams become outstanding at agile, creating products that make them proud and helping organizations reap the powerful benefits of teams that deliver both innovation and excellence.

Delivering Exceptional Project Results: A Practical Guide to Project Selection, Scoping, Estimation and Management
By:
Jamal Moustafaev
Published:
2010

Leading companies that are positioning themselves for the future rather than the present are asking the project managers to participate in project selection, scoping, and estimation as well as management. Delivering Exceptional Project Results offers a glimpse into the future role of the project manager.

Facilitating Project Performance Improvement: A Practical Guide to Multi-Level Learning
By:
Jerry Julian
Published:
2010

Waiting until the end of a project to identify "lessons learned" is too late. By that time, the project may be ready for the scrap heap. But if your projects and programs include multi-level learning, you'll not only be fostering continuous improvements for the future, you'll be well-equipped to reduce the risk of failure while projects are "in-flight" so you can deliver maximum value to your client organization. Facilitating Project Performance Improvement helps any organization:

Leadership Principles for Project Success
By:
Thomas Juli
Published:
2010

Filled with samples, templates, and guidelines that readers can immediately use in their projects, this practical guide covers the five principles of effective project leadership and how they can be applied in daily project work.

Managing the Black Hole: The Executive's Guide to Software Project Risk
By:
Gary Gack
Published:
2010

This book examines the underlying root causes of failures--the "Seven Deadly Sins" and provides a non-technical introduction to a range of proven remedies--the "Five Redeeming Virtues". The ideas in this book will enable your organization to join the elite few who have taken these lessons to heart

Mastering Software Project Management: Best Practices, Tools and Techniques
By:
Thomas M. Cagley, Jr., Murali Chemuturi
Published:
2010

Written from the standpoint of a project manager working in a software development organization, this unique guide explains software project management in its entirety, including project acquisition and execution with backward linkages to concepts that play a facilitation role in successful project management. It provides all the guidance, best practices, tools and techniques needed to master software project management and achieve superior results.

Practical Software Project Estimation
By:
Peter Hill
Published:
2010

Based on data collected by the International Software Benchmarking Standards Group (ISBSG), Practical Software Project Estimation explains how to accurately forecast the size, cost, and schedule of software projects. Get expert advice on generating accurate estimates, minimizing risks, and planning and managing projects. Valuable appendixes provide estimation equations, delivery rate tables, and the ISBSG Repository demographics.

Project Management the Agile Way
By:
John C. Goodpasture
Published:
2010

Project Management the Agile Way is for experienced project managers, system engineers, architects, and business analysts who are comfortable in traditional methods of project management, but now need to understand how to make agile work effectively in the enterprise. This book presents practical, day-to-day tips and application advice for how to harmonize agile methods with mainstream project processes and how to integrate these practices with other methodologies used in the business.

Reflections on Management
By:
Watts S. Humphrey, William R. Thomas
Published:
2010

A Lifetime of Invaluable Management Insights from Legendary Software Quality Guru Watts S. Humphrey

Rescue the Problem Project
By:
Todd C. Williams, PMP
Published:
2010

When budgets are dwindling, deadlines passing, and tempers flaring, the usual response is to browbeat the project team and point fingers of blame. Not helpful. For these situations, what is needed is an objective process for accurately assessing what is wrong and a clear plan of action for fixing the problem. "Rescue the Problem Project" provides project managers, executives, and customers with the answers they require.

Robustness Development and Reliability Growth
By:
John King and William Jewett
Published:
2010

This book integrates key tools and processes into a comprehensive program for developing more robust and reliable technology-based products. Drawing on their extensive product development expertise, the authors present a complete process for ensuring product performance throughout the entire lifecycle, from understanding customers’ needs through manufacturing and post launch support.

Scrum Project Management
By:
Kim H. Pries, John M. Quigley
Published:
2010

Scrum, which was originally invented solely for software development, can now be applied to all types of projects. This book shows project managers how to implement Scrum by explaining the artifacts, rituals, and roles used. The text provides Scrum planning methods to control project scope and schedule as well as Scrum tracking methods to focus teams on improving throughput and streamlining communications.

Software Project Management: A Unified Framework, 1st edition
By:
Walker Royce, et al.
Published:
2010

Software Project Management presents a new management framework uniquely suited to the complexities of modern software development. Walker Royce’s pragmatic perspective exposes the shortcomings of many well-accepted management priorities and equips software professionals with state-of-the-art knowledge derived from his twenty years of successful from-the-trenches project management experience.

The Agile Samurai
By:
Jonathan Rasmusson
Published:
2010

Get ready to kick some software project butt. By learning the ways of the agile samurai you will discover:

The Jazz Process
By:
Adrian Cho
Published:
2010

Experienced jazz musicians apply specific principles to collaborate, execute, and manage change in real time—delivering extraordinary innovation in the face of non-stop pressure and risk. Now, jazz musician and collaboration expert Adrian Cho shows how you can use the same principles to dramatically improve any team's performance.

97 Things Every Project Manager Should Know
By:
Barbee Davis
Published:
2009

If the projects you manage don't go as smoothly as you'd like, 97 Things Every Project Manager Should Know offers knowledge that's priceless, gained through years of trial and error. This illuminating book contains 97 short and extremely practical tips -- whether you're dealing with software or non-IT projects -- from some of the world's most experienced project managers and software developers.

Agile Project Management: Creating Innovative Products
By:
Jim Highsmith
Published:
2009

Best practices for managing projects in agile environments–now updated with new techniques for larger projects

Agile Software Development: Best Practices for Large Software Development Projects
By:
Thomas Sober and Uwe Hansmann
Published:
2009

Software Development is moving towards a more agile and more flexible approach. It turns out that the traditional "waterfall" model is not supportive in an environment where technical, financial and strategic constraints are changing almost every day. But what is agility? What are today’s major approaches? And especially: What is the impact of agile development principles on the development teams, on project management and on software architects?

Beautiful Teams: Inspiring and Cautionary Tales from Veteran Team Leaders
By:
Andrew Stellman, et. al.
Published:
2009

What's it like to work on a great software development team facing an impossible problem? How do you build an effective team? Can a group of people who don't get along still build good software? How does a team leader keep everyone on track when the stakes are high and the schedule is tight? Beautiful Teams takes you behind the scenes with some of the most interesting teams in software engineering history.

Changing How You Manage and Communicate Change
By:
Naomi Karten
Published:
2009

As heralds of change, you who work in and with IT will benefit from reading this book. You will better understand your own reactions to change and those of users, customers, employees and suppliers. You will more confidently be able to explain why a one-size-fits-all change management plan doesn't work and how to make it more flexible.

Effective Project Management: Traditional, Agile, Extreme
By:
Robert K. Wysocki
Published:
2009

Get ready for a more robust approach to project management--one that recognizes the project environment and adapts accordingly. This resource first introduces you to the tools, templates, and processes that you'll need in your toolkit. You'll then explore five different project management life cycle (PMLC) models for managing a project: Linear, Incremental, Iterative, Adaptive, and Extreme. Along the way, you'll find step-by-step guidance on how to apply each technique.

Growing Software: Proven Strategies for Managing Software Engineers
By:
Louis Testa
Published:
2009

As the technology leader at a small software company, you need to focus on people, products, processes, and technology as you bring your software to market, while doing your best to put out fires and minimize headaches.

Implementing Program Management: Templates and Forms Aligned with the Standard for Program Management
By:
Ginger Levin and Allen Green
Published:
2009

Written by two successful PgMPs, Implementing Program Management: Templates and Forms Aligned with the Standard for Program Management Second Edition–(2008) is a complete guide that presents a step-by-step methodology, suitable for the novice to the seasoned professional, enabling managers to seamlessly move their programs from theory to practice.

iTeam: Putting the ''I'' Back into Team
By:
William E. Perry
Published:
2009

William E. Perry in iTeam: Putting the 'I' Back into Team, is that most organizations put too much emphasis on joint effort, removing responsibility, ownership, and reward from individuals appointed to teams. What typically results is dysfunctional, essentially leaderless, and lacking in motivation.

Manage Your Project Portfolio: Increase Your Capacity and Finish More Projects
By:
Johanna Rothman
Published:
2009

This book will introduce you to different ways of ordering all of the projects you are working on now, and help you figure out how to staff those projects—even when you've run out of project teams to do the work.

Managing and Leading Software Projects
By:
Richard E. (Dick) Fairley
Published:
2009

This book bridges the communication gap between project managers and software developers working toward the common goal of developing successful software products and software systems.

Managing Web Projects
By:
Edward B. Farkas
Published:
2009

Putting the information you need and tools you can rely on at your ready disposal—Managing Web Projects—is a complete guide for project managers in the software industry.

PMP in Depth: Project Management Professional Study Guide for the PMP Exam
By:
Paul Sanghera
Published:
2009

The primary purpose of this book is to help you pass the Project Management Professional (PMP) exam administered by the Project Management Institute (PMI). Because the book has a laser-sharp focus on the exam objectives, expert project managers who want to pass the PMP exam can use this book to ensure that they do not miss any objective. Yet this is not simply an exam-cram book.

Principles of Software Development Leadership
By:
Ken Whitaker
Published:
2009

The software development market continues to grow worldwide. As projects become more complicated and the pressure to “do more with less”becomes the rule of thumb, the need for software managers to be well-versed with project management best practices becomes even more critical.

Quality Assurance of Agent-Based and Self-Managed Systems
By:
Reiner Dumke, et al.
Published:
2009

Based on the authors' more than fifteen years of experience in software agent technology, this book first presents the essential basics, aspects, and structures of the agent technology. It then covers the main quality aspects in software system development and gives current examples of agent measurement and evaluation. Focusing on software agent systems and multi-agent systems (MAS), the authors discuss the determination of quality properties.

Scrum Product Ownership
By:
Robert Galen
Published:
2009

One of the least discussed and most challenging roles in the Scrum Agile Methodology is that of Product Owner. Quite often Product Owners are selected from the ranks of Product Managers or Business Analysts and simply "thrown" into the role. While these backgrounds can lead to successful product ownership, often there are fundamental understanding and large skills gaps that need to be crossed in order to be truly successful.

Software Engineering Best Practices
By:
Capers Jones
Published:
2009

In this practical guide, software-quality guru Capers Jones reveals best practices for ensuring software development success by illustrating the engineering methods used by the most successful large software projects at leading companies such as IBM, Microsoft, Sony, and EDS.

Stand Back and Deliver
By:
Pollyanna Pixton, et al.
Published:
2009

Whether you're leading an organization, a team, or a project, Stand Back and Deliver gives you the agile leadership tools you'll need to achieve breakthrough levels of performance. This book brings together immediately usable frameworks and step-by-step processes that help you focus all your efforts where they matter most: delivering business value and building competitive advantage.

Succeeding with Agile
By:
Mike Cohn
Published:
2009

This is the definitive, realistic, actionable guide to starting fast with Scrum and agile–and then succeeding over the long haul. Leading agile consultant and practitioner Mike Cohn presents detailed recommendations, powerful tips, and real-world case studies drawn from his unparalleled experience helping hundreds of software organizations make Scrum and agile work.

The Complete Project Management Methodology and Toolkit
By:
Gerrard M. Hill
Published:
2009

In the past, an organization's technical methodologies were expected to fulfill project management process needs. However, they sometimes fell short of applying what is known today as "professional project management" concepts and practices.

The Passionate Programmer
By:
Chad Fowler
Published:
2009

Success in today's IT environment requires you to view your career as a business endeavor. In this book, you'll learn how to become an entrepreneur, driving your career in the direction of your choosing. You'll learn how to build your software development career step by step, following the same path that you would follow if you were building, marketing, and selling a product. After all, your skills themselves are a product.

The Principles of Product Development Flow
By:
Donald G. Reinertsen
Published:
2009

The Principles of Product Development Flow will forever change the way you think about product development. Reinertsen starts with the ideas of lean manufacturing but goes far beyond them, drawing upon ideas from telecommunications networks, transportation systems, computer operating systems and military doctrine. He combines a lucid explanation of the science behind flow with a rich set of practical approaches.

A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge
By:
Project Management Institute
Published:
2008

The PMBOK Guide–Fourth Edition continues the tradition of excellence in project management with a standard that is even easier to understand and implement, with improved consistency and greater clarification.

Adrenaline Junkies and Template Zombies
By:
Tom DeMarco, et al.
Published:
2008

In Adrenaline Junkies and Template Zombies, the six principal consultants of The Atlantic Systems Guild present the patterns of behavior they most often observe at the dozens of IT firms they transform each year, around the world.

Agile Portfolio Management
By:
Jochen Krebs
Published:
2008

Find out how your company's full project portfolio can benefit from the principles of agility from an expert on agile processes. Agile software development is now more popular than ever, but agility doesn't need to stop there. This guide takes a big-picture look at how portfolio managers and project managers can make use of proven agile development methods to increase organizational efficiency.

Getting Results from Software Development Teams
By:
Lawrence J. Peters
Published:
2008

Learn best practices for software development project management and lead your teams and projects to success. Dr. Lawrence Peters is an industry-recognized expert with decades of experience conducting research and leading real-world software projects. Beyond getting the best developers, equipment, budget, and timeline possible Peters concludes that no factor is more critical to project success than the manager's role.

Intelligent Mentoring: How IBM Creates Value through People, Knowledge, and Relationships
By:
Audrey J. Murrell, et al.
Published:
2008

Intelligent Mentoring reveals how IBM pepares its people to be tomorrow's leaders and offers specific guidance and best practices you can use to achieve equally powerful results. It demonstrates how IBM has fully integrated a diverse portfolio of formal mentoring initiatives into both talent development and innovation promotion.

Making Things Happen: Mastering Project Management
By:
Scott Berkun
Published:
2008

In the updated edition of this critically acclaimed and bestselling book, Microsoft project veteran Scott Berkun offers a collection of essays on field-tested philosophies and strategies for defining, leading, and managing projects.

Practical Insight into CMMI: Second Edition
By:
Tim Kasse
Published:
2008

The newly revised and expanded edition of the bestseller, Practical Insight into CMMI® is an essential reference for engineering, IT and management professionals striving to grasp the "look and feel of a successful business oriented process improvement implementation".

Pragmatic Thinking and Learning
By:
Andy Hunt
Published:
2008

Together we'll journey together through bits of cognitive and neuroscience, learning and behavioral theory. You'll discover some surprising aspects of how our brains work, and see how you can beat the system to improve your own learning and thinking skills. In this book you'll learn how to:

Professionalizing Business Analysis
By:
Kathleen B. Hass, PMP
Published:
2008

With the continually changing business environment, the business analyst is becoming a critical project leader and business/technology consultant helping organizations ensure they are investing in the most valuable projects, and then managing the project benefits. Professionalizing Business Analysis: Breaking the Cycle of Challenged Projects focuses on the emerging business analysis profession, and describes both the strategic and tactical roles of the business analyst.

Project Management Communications Bible
By:
William Dow, Bruce Taylor
Published:
2008

The authoritative reference on one of the most important aspects of managing projects--project communications.

Software Creativity 2.0
By:
Robert L. Glass
Published:
2008

There's a fundamental conflict in the software world, sometimes taking on the attributes of a war. On one side, managers search for ways to impose more discipline and control on software builders, and researchers advocate and sometimes seek to mandate formal methods for the same purpose. On the other side, software builders quietly continue to build software pretty much the way they always have, with freewheeling methods and creative solutions.

Software Engineering: Principles and Practice
By:
Hans van Vliet
Published:
2008

Software Engineering: Principles and Practice challenges the reader to appreciate the issues, design trade-offs and teamwork required for successful software development. This new edition has been brought fully up to date, with complete coverage of all aspects of the software lifecycle and a strong focus on all the skills needed to carry out software projects on time and within budget. Highlights of the third edition include:

Software Teamwork: Taking Ownership for Success in Software Development
By:
Jim Brosseau
Published:
2008

Software Teamwork is a compelling, innovative, intensely practical guide to improving the human dynamics that are crucial to building great software.

Software Testing: Interview Questions
By:
S. Sheikh and S. Koirala
Published:
2008

The competence and quality of software testers are often judged by the various testing techniques they have mastered. As the name suggests, the book provides a self-study format and is designed for certification course review and for freshers as well as professionals who are searching for opportunities in the software testing field.

The Business Analyst's Handbook
By:
Howard Podeswa
Published:
2008

The Business Analyst (BA) plays an important role as liaison between business stakeholders and the technical team (software developers, vendors, etc.), ensuring that business needs are reflected in any software solution. Despite the importance of the job, there is currently no book specifically designed as a comprehensive reference manual for the working BA.

The Gift of Time
By:
Fiona Charles
Published:
2008

Consultants and managers from diverse fields present perspectives on lessons learned from Gerald M. Weinberg. A celebration of Jerry Weinberg’s still-flourishing career, The Gift of Time is at once a tribute to a remarkable and influential software and systems pioneer, an introduction to his work, and a collection of lively and informative essays.

The Productive Programmer
By:
Neal Ford
Published:
2008

Anyone who develops software for a living needs a proven way to produce it better, faster, and cheaper. The Productive Programmer offers critical timesaving and productivity tools that you can adopt right away, no matter what platform you use.

The Software Project Manager's Bridge to Agility
By:
Stacia Broderick, Michele Sliger
Published:
2008

When software development teams move to agile methods, experienced project managers often struggle—doubtful about the new approach and uncertain about their new roles and responsibilities. In this book, two long-time certified Project Management Professionals (PMPRs) and Scrum trainers have built a bridge to this dynamic new paradigm. They show experienced project managers how to successfully transition to agile by refocusing on facilitation and collaboration, not "command and control."

Web Security Testing Cookbook
By:
Paco Hope and Ben Walther
Published:
2008

Among the tests you perform on web applications, security testing is perhaps the most important, yet it's often the most neglected. The recipes in the Web Security Testing Cookbook demonstrate how developers and testers can check for the most common web security issues, while conducting unit tests, regression tests, or exploratory tests. Unlike ad hoc security assessments, these recipes are repeatable, concise, and systematic-perfect for integrating into your regular test suite.

Head First PMP
By:
J. Green, PMP, and A. Stellman, PMP
Published:
2007

With its visually rich format designed for the way the brain works, Head First PMP is the perfect book for Project Management Professionals (PMPs) who want to obtain or renew their certification. Using the unique and highly effective Head First learning concept, this unique book provides much-needed coverage of the PMBOK (Project Management Body of Knowledge) objectives and certification exam.

Manage It!—Your Guide to Modern, Pragmatic Project Management
By:
Johanna Rothman
Published:
2007

This book is a reality-based guide for modern projects. You'll learn how to recognize your project's potholes and ruts, and determine the best way to fix problems—without causing more problems. Your project can't fail. That's a lot of pressure on you, and yet you don't want to buy into any one specific process, methodology, or lifecycle.

 

Practical Project Initiation
By:
Karl Wiegers
Published:
2007

Get the practical guide to getting your development project off to a successful start!Zero in on key project-initiation tasks--and build a solid foundation for successful software development. In this concise guide, critically-acclaimed author Karl E. Wiegers fills a void in project management literature by focusing on the activities that are essential--but often overlooked--for launching any project.

Practical Software Estimation: Function Point Methods for Insourced and Outsourced Projects
By:
M. A. Parthasarathy
Published:
2007

Practical Software Estimation brings together today's most valuable tips, techniques, and best practices for accurately estimating software project costs and schedules. Authored by one of the field's leading experts, it addresses the full spectrum of real-world challenges you face in developing reliable estimates.

Professional Software Testing with Visual Studio 2005 Team System
By:
Arnold, Hopton, Leonard, Frost
Published:
2007

With the introduction of Visual Studio 2005 Team System (VSTS), Microsoft for the first time offers software developers and test engineers a complete and integrated suite of tools for software testing. This authoritative book shares with you best practices for software testing using VSTS test and development tools and covers all phases of the development lifecycle so that you may learn how to implement these practices.

Scaling Software Agility: Best Practices for Large Enterprises
By:
Dean Leffingwell
Published:
2007

Agile development practices, while still controversial in some circles, offer undeniable benefits: faster time to market, better responsiveness to changing customer requirements, and higher quality. However, agile practices have been defined and recommended primarily to small teams. In Scaling Software Agility, Dean Leffingwell describes how agile methods can be applied to enterprise-class development.

Six Sigma Software Development
By:
Christine B. Tayntor
Published:
2007

Revised and updated, this second edition clearly explains Six Sigma concepts and their application, maps Six Sigma concepts and tools to all aspects of system development, and proposes the use of Six Sigma tools to evaluate and improve the overall performance of the IT department. In addition to classic Six Sigma, the book introduces Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) and illustrates when and how its tools and techniques can be used to increase the robustness and reliability of a new system.

Smart & Gets Things Done
By:
Joel Spolsky
Published:
2007

A guide to attracting, recruiting, interviewing, and hiring the best technical talent.

Visual Studio Team System
By:
Will Stott, James W. and Newkirk
Published:
2007

Visual Studio Team System (VSTS) gives Microsoft development teams a powerful, integrated toolset for Agile development. Visual Studio Team System: Better Software Development for Agile Teams is a comprehensive, start-to-finish guide to making the most of VSTS in real-world Agile environments.

Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great
By:
Esther Derby, Diana Larsen
Published:
2006

See how to mine the experience of your software development team continually throughout the life of the project. The tools and recipes in this book will help you uncover and solve hidden (and not-so-hidden) problems with your technology, your methodology, and those difficult "people" issues on your team.

Agile Software Development: The Cooperative Game
By:
Alistair Cockburn
Published:
2006

The agile model of software development has taken the world by storm. Now, in Agile Software Development, Second Edition, one of agile’s leading pioneers updates his Jolt Productivity award-winning book to reflect all that’s been learned about agile development since its original introduction.

Antipatterns: Identification, Refactoring and Management
By:
Phillip A. Laplante, Colin J. Neill
Published:
2006

AntiPatterns: Identification, Refactoring, and Management catalogs 48 bad management practices and environments common to software development, IT, and other organizations. The authors cover antipatterns of management, along with environmental/cultural antipatterns and personality antipatterns/phenotypes. Through the classification of these harmful practices, you will be able to identify problems in your own work environment, and take action to correct them.

Catastrophe Disentanglement: Getting Software Projects Back on Track
By:
Em Bennatan
Published:
2006

This book provides detailed guidelines for software project recovery. Some of the steps the author recommends may be unpleasant, but all are important.”

A 10-Step Process to Identify Severely Trobuled Projects and Avoid Costly Failure
It's a software development nightmare: a project that's rapidly spiraling out of control...or already a disaster. Conventional project management techniques won’t save these projects: there are no tandard rescue processes to follow.

Collaboration Explained: Facilitation Skills for Software Project Leaders
By:
Jean Tabaka
Published:
2006

To succeed, an agile project demands outstanding collaboration among all its stakeholders. But great collaboration doesn’t happen by itself; it must be carefully planned and facilitated throughout the entire project lifecycle. Collaboration Explained is the first book to bring together proven, start-to-finish techniques for ensuring effective collaboration in any agile software project.

Estimating Software Costs
By:
Capers Jones
Published:
2006

Get a handle on skyrocketing software costs. Are your software costs spiraling out of control? Do your projects chronically run late, exceed budget, and go out the door bug-laden, if at all? Have you discovered a commercial software cost estimating tool that works for your situation? Are you even familiar with how these increasingly sophisticated tools operate?

Fundamentals of Project Management
By:
James P. Lewis
Published:
2006

In today’s time-based and cost-conscious global business environment, tight project deadlines and stringent expectations are the norm. With sales of more than 115,000 copies, Fundamentals of Project Management has helped a lot of business people meet or exceed those standards.

Innovation Games: Creating Breakthrough Products Through Collaborative Play
By:
Luke Hohmann
Published:
2006

The toughest part of innovation? Accurately predicting what customers want, need and will pay for. Even if you ask the, they often can’t explain what they want. Now, there’s a breakthrough solution: Innovation Games. Drawing on his software product strategy and product management consulting experience. Luke Hohmann has created twelve games that help you uncover your customers’ true, hidden needs and desires.

Managing Iterative Software Development Projects
By:
Kurt Bittner, Ian Spence
Published:
2006

Leading iterative development experts Kurt Bittner and Ian Spence introduce a proven, scalable approach that improves both agility and control at the same time, satisfying the needs of developers, managers, and the business alike. Their techniques are easy to understand, and easy to use with any iterative methodology, from Rational Unified Process to Extreme Programming to the Microsoft Solutions Framework.

Maximizing Project Value: Defining, Managing, And Measuring for Optimal Return
By:
Jeff Berman
Published:
2006

What good is a project that's on time...on budget...and ends up providing your organization with no bottom-line results whatsoever? Whether it falls short of expectations, fails to ultimately be embraced by the people in the company meant to be using it, or simply lands with a thud in the marketplace, a project that doesn't truly deliver value is worthless at best. It's great to be on time and under budget, but to achieve positive results, project managers have to embrace an all-new philosophy of what it is they do for their organizations.

Process-Based Software Project Management
By:
F. Alan Goodman
Published:
2006

Not connecting software project management to actual, real-world development processes can lead to cost overruns, bad tasking decisions, and unrealistic schedules that can hinder any software project. This volume describes clearly and simply how to make the project management-process management connection to control software engineering tasking, quality, metrics, and repeatability.

Project Requirements
By:
Ralph R. Young
Published:
2006

Project Requirements: A Guide to Best Practices gives project managers tools they can assimilate and apply easily to improve project success rates, reduce development costs, reduce rework, and accelerate time to market.

Results Without Authority
By:
Tom Kendrick
Published:
2006

How to take control of teams and projects even when you're not the boss.... Project leaders these days supervise few if any of the people that they rely upon for project success. Getting projects off to a good start and then maintaining control of them is an enormous challenge for a project leader who has little or no formal authority.

Safe and Sound Software: Creating an Efficient and Effective Quality System for Software Medical Device Organizations
By:
Thomas Faris
Published:
2006

This book provides information and recommendations to help regulatory affairs and quality managers and consultants of software medical device design and development organizations navigate the complex course of regulatory compliance, operational excellence, product quality, and customer satisfaction to create an effective and efficient quality system.

Software Engineering with Microsoft Visual Studio Team System (Microsoft .Net Development Series)
By:
Sam Guckenheimer, Juan J. Perez
Published:
2006

Software Engineering with Microsoft Visual Studio Team System is written for any software team that is considering running a software project using Visual Studio Team System (VSTS), or evaluating modern software development practices for its use.

Software Project Management: Measures for Improving Performance
By:
Robert Bruce Kelsey, PhD
Published:
2006

Software Project Management: Measures for Improving Performance focuses on more than the mechanics of project execution. By showing the reader how to identify and solve real world problems that put schedule, cost and quality at risk, this guide gets to the heart of improving project control and performance.

Software Sizing, Estimation, and Risk Management
By:
Daniel D. Galorath and Michael W. Evans
Published:
2006

Software Sizing, Estimation, and Risk Management: When Performance is Measured Performance Improves is a practical, hands-on discussion of the software estimation, planning, and control process. This includes critical factors that impact estimates, methods for selecting and applying appropriate measures to projects, proper software sizing, and processes to identify and manage risk.

Successful Packaged Software Implementation
By:
Christine B. Tayntor
Published:
2006

Successful Packaged Software Implementation guides IT departments through the selection and implementation of packaged software, pointing out potential pitfalls and how to avoid them. Offering a step-by-step approach, this volume begins with an assessment as to whether packaged software is the correct solution. It then analyzes the product selection and contract negotiation processes before addressing the technical details of installation and configuration.

Teach What You Know
By:
Steve Trautman
Published:
2006

Breakthrough Knowledge Transfer Techniques for Every Professional!

No matter where you work there are people with experience teaching people who need to learn. Everyone is part of this exchange yet few people know how to do it well. Now, there’s a comprehensive how-to manual for effective knowledge transfer: Teach What You Know.

The Career Programmer
By:
Christopher Duncan
Published:
2006

Unrealistic schedules, unstable releases, continual overtime, and skyrocketing stress levels are legendary in the software development industry. Unlike traditional occupations such as accounting or administration, the software business is populated with programmers who are as creative and passionate about their work as musicians and artists.

The Software Hiring Handbook
By:
Michael Kahn
Published:
2006

This book is a guide to conducting a job interview for various positions in the software industry. As technology continues to evolve and the number of programming languages, hardware platforms, and standards continues to increase, it is becoming necessary for a software manager to rely on team members for evaluating candidates on a technical level.

The User Is Always Right
By:
Steve Mulder and Ziv Yaar
Published:
2006

How do we ensure that our Web sites actually give users what they need? What are the best ways to understand our users' goals, behaviors, and attitudes, and then turn that understanding into business results? Personas bring user research to life and make it actionable, ensuring we're making the right decisions based on the right information. This practical guide explains how to create and use personas to make your site more successful.

Trusted Platform Module Basics: Using TPM in Embedded Systems
By:
Steven L. Kinney
Published:
2006

Aimed particularly at embedded designers and developers, this new book provides a sound foundation on the TPM, helping them to take advantage of hardware security based on sound TCG standards. It covers all the TPM basics, discussing in detail the TPM Key Hierarchy and the Trusted Platform Module specification. The book presents a methodology to enable designers and developers to successfully integrate the TPM into an embedded design and verify the TPM's operation on a specific platform.

TSP(SM)-Coaching Development Teams
By:
Watts S. Humphrey
Published:
2006

Most modern software development projects require teams, and good teamwork largely determines a project’s success. The Team Software Process (TSP), created by Watts S. Humphrey, is a set of engineering practices and team concepts that produce effective teams, thereby helping developers deliver high-quality products on time and within budget.

Web Engineering: The Discipline of Systematic Development of Web Applications
By:
Gerti Kappel
Published:
2006

The World Wide Web has a massive and permanent influence on our lives. Economy, industry, education, healthcare, public administration, entertainment – there is hardly any part of our daily lives which has not been pervaded by the Internet. Accordingly, modern Web applications are fully-fledged, complex software systems, and in order to be successful their development must be thorough and systematic.

Agile Estimating and Planning
By:
Mike Cohn
Published:
2005

This book goes beyond the strategy of just enough planning and estimating, and shows readers how to make Agile practices truly work organizationally. Save time, conserve organizational resources, and manage software projects more efficiently by learning to anticipate future needs. Key points are supported by case studies derived from real-world projects.

Agile Management for Software Engineering: Applying the Theory of Constraints for Business Results
By:
David J. Anderson
Published:
2005

A breakthrough approach to managing Agile software development . . . Agile methods might just be the alternative to outsourcing. However, Agile development must scale in scope and discipline to be acceptable in the boardrooms of the Fortune 1000. In "Agile Management for Software Engineering," David J.

Applied Software Project Management
By:
Andrew Stellman and Jennifer Greene
Published:
2005

What makes software projects succeed? It takes more than a good idea and a team of talented programmers. A project manager needs to know how to guide the team through the entire software project. There are common pitfalls that plague all software projects and rookie mistakes that are made repeatedly--sometimes by the same people! Avoiding these pitfalls is not hard, but it is not necessarily intuitive. Luckily, there are tried and true techniques that can help any project manager.

Behind Closed Doors: Secrets of Great Management
By:
Johanna Rothman and Esther Derby
Published:
2005

Great management is difficult to see as it occurs. It's possible to see the results of great management, but it's not easy to see how managers achieve those results. Great management happens in one-on-one meetings and with other managers--all in private. It's hard to learn management by example when you can't see it. You can learn to be a better manager--even a great manager--with this guide.

Corporate Software Project Management
By:
Guy W. Lecky-Thompson
Published:
2005

Learn to produce quality software on time and within budget! It has long been accepted in the software industry that projects will be late, over budget, and lacking in agreed upon features due to technical or time limitations. As more companies become involved with the development and deployment of large-scale software projects, it is necessary to define ways to ensure that quality products are produced.

Cube Farm
By:
Bill Blunden
Published:
2005

Truth is often stranger than fiction, especially when it comes to the workplace. In Cube Farm, author Bill Blunden recounts his three years in Minnesota, performing research and development for Lawson Software. Riddled with intrigue, duplicity and collusion, this story offers a trench-level view of a company in the throes of internal rivalry, and suffering from a string of failed projects.

Estimating Software-Intensive Systems: Projects, Products, and Processes
By:
Richard D. Stutzke
Published:
2005

Many software projects fail because their leaders don't know how to estimate, schedule, or measure them accurately. Fortunately, proven tools and techniques exist for every facet of software estimation. Estimating Software-Intensive Systems brings them together in a real-world guidebook that will help software managers, engineers, and customers immediately improve their estimates -- and drive continuing improvements over time.

Fearless Change: Patterns for Introducing New Ideas
By:
M. Manns, PhD and L. Rising, PhD
Published:
2005

Since you picked up this book, we assume that you've tried to introduce something new into your organization. Maybe you were successful or maybe you were not completely happy with the result. Change is hard. Wouldn't it be wonderful if all the people, just like you, those "powerless leaders," who have had some success in their attempts to introduce a new idea, could sit down with you and share their secrets? This book will provide the next best thing.

Handbook of Integrated Risk Management for E-Business: Measuring, Modeling, and Managing Risk
By:
Abderrahim Labbi, ed.
Published:
2005

This ground-breaking professional reference integrates converging views of e-business processes and offers ways to manage their inherent risks with advanced modeling techniques.

Performance Assurance for IT Systems
By:
Brian King
Published:
2005

King, a veteran consultant in the information technology industry, promotes the concept of performance assurance throughout the entire system lifecycle, examining not only the technical aspects of performance, but also the relevant processes and topics related to companies and people. His goal is for readers to understand the fundamental issues that surround performance and technology such that they can apply them to formulate a coherent customized approach to performance assurance.

Practical Guide to Software Quality Management (2nd Edition)
By:
John Horch
Published:
2005

If you are responsible for designing, implementing, or managing a quality software program, this updated edition of the Practical Guide to Software Quality Management now identifies 10 major components that make up a solid program in line with ISO 9001 quality management precepts.

Practical Software Process Improvement
By:
Robert Fantina
Published:
2005

Based on CMM/CMMI, this unique new resource offers you practical "how to" guidance on software process improvement. The book provides you with clear implementation steps that are designed to have a highly positive impact on even your most challenging projects. You get valuable, time-saving templates that can be quickly tailored for your purposes and used immediately.

Pragmatic Project Automation
By:
Mike Clark
Published:
2005

Forget wizards, you need a slave--someone to do your repetitive, tedious and boring tasks, without complaint and without pay, so you'll have more time to design and write exciting code. That's what computers are for: you can enlist your computer to automate all of your project's repetitive tasks, ranging from individual builds and running unit tests through to full product release and customer deployment.

Pragmatic Version Control Using CVS
By:
Andy Hunt and Dave Thomas
Published:
2005

This book is a recipe-based approach to using the CVS Version Control system that will get you up and running quickly--and correctly. All projects need version control: it's one of the foundational pieces of any project's infrastructure. Yet half of all project teams in the U.S. don't use any version control at all. Many others don't use it well, and end up experiencing time-consuming problems.

Pragmatic Version Control Using Subversion
By:
Mike Mason
Published:
2005

This book covers the theory behind version control and how it can help developers become more efficient, work better as a team, and keep on top of software complexity. All projects need version control: it's the lifeblood of any project's infrastructure, yet half of all project teams in the U.S. don't use any version control at all. Many others don't use it well and end up experiencing time-consuming problems.

Reducing Risk with Software Process Improvement
By:
Louis Poulin
Published:
2005

Reducing Risk with Software Process Improvements recommends the critical practices that aid in the successful delivery of software products and services. The author describes the observations that he made over a period of ten years in IT projects and organizations. He focuses on the areas of software development and maintenance, highlighting the most frequently encountered problems that occur due to poor processes.

Requirements-Led Project Management
By:
James Robertson, Suzanne Robertson
Published:
2005

Requirements are a crucial ingredient of any successful project. This is true for any product--software, hardware, consumer appliance, or large-scale construction. You have to understand its requirements--what is needed and desired--if you are to build the right product. Most developers recognize the truth in this statement, even if they don't always live up to it.

Ship It! A Practical Guide to Successful Software Projects
By:
Jared Richardson, William Gwaltney Jr.
Published:
2005

"Ship It!" avoids current fashion trends and marketing hype; instead, readers find page after page of solid advice, all tried and tested in the real world. This book is a collection of tips that show what tools a successful team has to use, and how to use them well. Developers will get quick, easy-to-follow advice on modern techniques and when they should be applied.

Aimed at beginning to intermediate programmers, this book will show you:

Software Endgames
By:
Robert Galen
Published:
2005

In software development, projects are won or lost during the endgame--that final stage between release for testing and release to customers.

Software Endgames presents realistic strategies for delivering working software to your customers. Focusing solely on the endgame, the book provides hard-won, hands-on practices you can implement right away.

Software Project Management: 4th Edition
By:
Bob Hughes and Mike Cotterell
Published:
2005

From its first appearance in 1995, this book has been consistently well received by tutors and students alike. Now in its fourth edition, this textbook is highly regarded for providing a complete introduction to Software Project Management for both undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Software Project Secrets
By:
George Stepanek
Published:
2005

Offers a new path to success in the software industry. This book reaches out to managers, developers, and customers who use industry-standard methodologies, but whose projects still struggle to succeed.

Systems Testing with an Attitude
By:
Nathan Petschenik
Published:
2005

Quality cannot be tested into software, it must be designed in and built in. Understanding and accepting this simple principle can be the first step to preventing serious system defects from reaching users.

The Art of Project Management
By:
Scott Berkun
Published:
2005

"The Art of Project Management" covers it all--from practical methods for making sure work gets done right and on time, to the mindset that can make you a great leader motivating your team to do their best. Reading this was like reading the blueprint for how the best projects are managed at Microsoft... I wish we always put these lessons into action!" --Joe Belfiore, General Manager, E-home Division, Microsoft Corporation

The ROI from Software Quality
By:
Khaled El Emam
Published:
2005

Defects play a large role in most software projects, ultimately leading to deficiencies and lost revenue. The ROI from Software Quality provides the tools needed for software engineers and project managers to calculate how much they should invest in quality, what benefits the investment will reap, and just how quickly those benefits will be realized.

The Software Development Edge
By:
Joe Marasco
Published:
2005

Over the course of a distinguished career, Joe Marasco earned a reputation as the go-to software project manager: the one to call when you were facing a brutally tough, make-or-break project. Marasco reflected on his experiences in a remarkable series of "Franklin's Kite" essays for The Rational Edge, Rational and IBM's online software development magazine.

TSP(SM)-Leading a Development Team
By:
Watts S. Humphrey
Published:
2005

Leaders of software-development projects face many challenges. First, you must produce a quality product on schedule and on budget. Second, you must foster and encourage a cohesive, motivated, and smoothly operating team. And third, you must maintain a clear and consistent focus on short- and long-term goals, while exemplifying quality standards and showing confidence and enthusiasm for your team and its efforts.

Windows Forensics and Incident Recovery
By:
Harlan Carvey
Published:
2005

If you're responsible for protecting Windows systems, firewalls and anti-virus aren't enough. You also need to master incident response, recovery, and auditing. Leading Windows security expert and instructor Harlan Carvey offers a start-to-finish guide to everything administrators must know to recognize and respond to virtually any attack.

Achieving Software Quality Through Teamwork
By:
Isabel Evans
Published:
2004

Successful software depends not only on technical excellence but on how members of the software team work together. Written in easy to understand language by a leading expert in the field, this ground-breaking volume provides an overview of the team culture required to develop quality software.

Agile and Iterative Development: A Manager’s Guide
By:
Craig Larman
Published:
2004

This is the definitive guide for managers and students to agile and iterative development methods: what they are, how they work, how to implement them—and why you should. Using statistically significant research and large-scale case studies, noted methods expert Craig Larman presents the most convincing case ever made for iterative development.

Agile Project Management with Scrum
By:
Ken Schwaber
Published:
2004

Apply the principles of Scrum, one of the most popular agile programming methods, to software project management -and focus your team on delivering real business value. Author Ken Schwaber, a leader in the agile process movement and a co-creator of Scrum, brings his vast expertise to helping you guide the product and software development process more effectively and efficiently.

Hiring the Best Knowledge Workers, Techies & Nerds: The Secrets & Science of Hiring Technical People
By:
Johanna Rothman
Published:
2004

Good technical people are the foundation on which successful high technology organizations are built. Establishing a good process for hiring such workers is essential. Unfortunately, the generic methods so often used for hiring skill-based staff, who can apply standardized methods to almost any situation, are of little use to those charged with the task of hiring technical people.

It Sounded Good When We Started: A Project Manager’s Guide to Working with People on Projects
By:
Dwayne Phillips
Published:
2004

It Sounded Good When We Started: A Project Manager's Guide to Working with People on Projects provides essential reading for project managers trying to understand the trials and triumphs that can arise in any project setting.

Managing Information Technology Projects
By:
James Taylor
Published:
2004

Managing Information Technology Projects gives systems project managers field-proven tools and step-by-step methodologies to start and complete every project -- hardware, software, or integration -- within prescribed parameters. 

Practical Software Engineering
By:
Enricos Manassis
Published:
2004

Most would shudder to think if cities or automobiles were built in the same ad hoc fashion as most software. Still, Microsoft technologists often regard software development as more of a craft than a rigorous process. Given the mission-critical nature of today's software solutions, however, such an approach is vital to ensuring that high-quality projects are delivered on time and within budget.

Return On Software
By:
Steve Tockey
Published:
2004

Return on Software is about making choices: software technical choices in a business context. It helps software professionals appreciate the business consequences of the decisions they make. This primer will prove a valuable reference for making the important decisions the typical software organization faces both today and down the road.

You will learn how to:

Software Engineering for Small Projects: A RUP-Centric Approach
By:
Liz Augustine, Chris Lowe, Gary Pollice
Published:
2004

Do you want to improve the process on your next project? Perhaps you'd like to combine the best practices from the Rational Unified Process (RUP) and from agile methodologies (such as Extreme Programming). If so, buy this book! "Software Engineering for Small Projects" takes you from the initial customer contact through the delivery of the software product, explaining through case study how one small, distributed team applied a successful process. But this is not a perfect case study.

Software Project Management: Methods and Techniques
By:
Lawrence J. Peters
Published:
2004

Utilizing more than 36 years experience in this field, Dr. Peters demonstrates how to be successful in the software field. He focuses on what the industry has cited for 25 years as the key to success: management. He does this by presenting a unique set of the latest and most effective techniques adapted from business, psychology, engineering, accounting, law and other fields which contribute to bringing projects in on time, on budget and exceeding client expectations.

The End of Software
By:
Dr. Timothy Chou
Published:
2004

Do you know what is the real cost of your software? Before you reach for a calculator, be forewarned that it's a trick question. Even technology industry analysts and seasoned IT executives have difficulty putting a hard figure on the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) of today's enterprise application solutions.

Working Effectively with Legacy Code
By:
Michael Feathers
Published:
2004

Is your code easy to change? Can you get nearly instantaneous feedback when you do change it? Do you understand it? If the answer to any of these questions is no, you have legacy code, and it is draining time and money away from your development efforts.

Five Core Metrics: The Intelligence Behind Successful Software Management
By:
Lawrence H. Putnam, Ware Myers
Published:
2003

(From the back cover)

How to Bid, Control, and Complete Your Software Projects Using Metrics

To succeed in the software industry, managers need to cultivate a reliable development process. By measuring what teams have achieved on previous projects, managers can more accurately set goals, make bids, and ensure the successful completion of new projects.

Identifying and Managing Project Risk
By:
Tom Kendrick
Published:
2003

If you're a smart manager, you know that conducting risk analysis to minimize the possibility of failure in complicated projects is not just a good idea, it's an absolute necessity. Perhaps the most critical of the nine content areas of the Project Management Body of Knowledge, project risk management is crucial for getting complex jobs done successfully. But until now, there hasn't been a clear-cut, easy-to-read guide to help you through the process.

Managing Software for Growth: Without Fear, Control, and the Manufacturing Mindset
By:
Roy Miller
Published:
2003

After more than thirty years of making software in an increasingly global economy dominated by technology, why is creating software still so hard?  Software development expert Roy Miller answers this and other questions in Managing Software for Growth, the first truly insightful guide for industry observers and IT leaders who struggle to make great software despite the challenges.

Software Project Management: Coordinating People, Process, Tools, and Measurements
By:
Joel Henry
Published:
2003

Software Project Management provides insight to the importance of careful project management. Topics are presented in the same order that they appear in the progression of actual projects. The author utilizes his creative writing background to teach these topics with the tone of a friend sitting beside each student, rather than as a general lecture on the material.

Software Testing Fundamentals
By:
Marnie Hutcheson
Published:
2003

A software tester’s survival guide from a leading expert in the field.

The Blind Men and the Elephant: Mastering Project Work
By:
David A. Schmaltz
Published:
2003

Using the "blind men and the elephant" metaphor, this useful guide explains how a "follow the leader" approach creates troubled projects by pulling attention from the real source of power and authority—the individual. Using real-world stories, it shows how anyone can transform a fuzzy project assignment into a meaningful, satisfying experience. Author David A.

The Bug: A Novel
By:
Ellen Ullman
Published:
2003

"The Bug" is a mesmerizing first novel about a demonic, elusive computer bug and the havoc it wreaks on the lives of the people around it. This rare combination: a novel of ideas and a suspense, it is a story about obsession and love that takes readers deep into both the personal and virtual life. In 1984, at the dawn of the personal-computer era, Roberta Walton, a novice software tester at a SiliconValley start-up, stumbles across a bug.

The Project Manager’s Guide to Software Engineering’s Best Practices
By:
Richard Thayer, Mark J. Christensen
Published:
2003

(From the back cover) Since the earliest days of the computer industry, managing a software project has been a complex and demanding activity. While the technical content of software products and the technical methods used to build them have changed over time, the fundamental issues that determine the success or failure of software projects have remained fairly constant.

Waltzing With Bears
By:
Tom DeMarco, Tim Lister
Published:
2003

Any software project that's worth starting will be vulnerable to risk. Since greater risks bring greater rewards, a company that runs away from risk will soon find itself lagging behind its more adventurous competition.
By ignoring the threat of negative outcomes—in the name of positive thinking or a Can-Do attitude—software managers drive their organizations into the ground.

Communication Gaps and How to Close Them
By:
Naomi Karten
Published:
2002

If you develop systems or software for a living, you know that communication is essential for success.

Developers, managers, and testers have to understand each other clearly in order to meet client requirements, build work-related relationships, and survive time pressures and market demands. So often, though, communication breaks down, and we shout at each other across communication gaps that widen into yawning chasms.

Managing High-Intensity Internet Projects
By:
Edward Yourdon
Published:
2002

Legendary IT leader Ed Yourdon delivers instant, practical solutions for key challenges associated with Internet development.

Mentoring Object Technology Projects
By:
Richard T. Dué
Published:
2002

In Mentoring Object Technology Projects, one of the world's leading object development consultants presents a complete life cycle framework for managing any object-based project. Drawing on his consulting experience in 28 countries, Richard T. Dué covers every facet of project management, including planning, estimating, staffing, organization, implementation, ongoing supervision, and more.

On Time and Under Budget
By:
Alan B. Cline
Published:
2002

On Time and Under Budget offers project leaders or managers a "recipe for project success" that has been tested and proven during the last seven years.

Powerful Project Leadership
By:
Wayne Strider
Published:
2002

Have you ever worked on a project that ran into serious snags? A project that was canceled after significant time and expense? Or one that delived an acceptable result, but the people involved would rather have jumped off a cliff than work together again?

Project Management Nation
By:
Jason "Jay" Charvat
Published:
2002

Organizations depend on IT project managers to support overall business strategies with clear-cut benefits and advantages. As the bridge between the larger business strategy and the functional project level, project managers are expected to ensure key benefits such as reduced delivery costs, accelerated product-to-market speed, focus on client needs, and improved quality.

Quality Software Project Management
By:
Robert T. Futrell, et. al
Published:
2002

The practical handbook of software project management-by practitioners, for practitioners! Quality Software Project Management is the practical, start-to-finish project management resource for every software professional-experienced managers and developers moving into leadership roles.

Radical Project Management
By:
Rob Thomsett
Published:
2002

Project management for today's complex, chaotic business environments.

* Innovative new XPM tools: how to make them work in your organization
* XPM: the first radically new approach to project management in decades!
* Designed from the ground up for today's high-speed, fast-changing projects
* Refocusing project management focused on people, relationships, and adding value!

Real Web Project Management
By:
Gregory A. Remillard, Thomas J. Shelford
Published:
2002

From the Back Cover: The process of designing and building today's dynamic Web applications comes with a host of challenges not typically solved by traditional project management methodologies. A wealth of practical resources, Real Web Project Management: Case Studies and Best Practices from the Trenches is a book of solutions for designing, managing, and delivering virtually any type of Web-based project under even the most challenging of conditions.

Software Configuration Management Patterns
By:
Brad Appleton, Stephen P. Berczuk
Published:
2002

Software Configuration Management Patterns alleviates software engineers' most common concerns about software configuration management (SCM)--perceived rigidity and an overemphasis on process. This book demonstrates how effective SCM strategies promote a healthy, team-oriented culture that produces better software. Through the use of patterns, the authors show that properly managed workflow can avert delays, morale problems, and cost overruns.

Software Engineering, Vol. 2
By:
Dixie Garr, Mark J. Christensen, Richard Thayer
Published:
2002

(Back Cover Copy)

Software Project Management in Practice
By:
Pankaj Jalote
Published:
2002

We often hear about software projects that are late, over budget, or unable to satisfy customer needs. Yet some organizations are able to manage project after project successfully with desired results. In this book, Pankaj Jalote looks at one such organization, Infosys Technologies, a highly regarded high maturity organization, and details the processes it has in place to manage projects.

Writing Better Requirements
By:
Ian Alexander, Richard Stevens
Published:
2002

Experience has shown us that investment in the requirements process saves time, money, and effort. Yet, development efforts consistently charge ahead without investing sufficiently in the requirements process. We are so intent to develop the technical solutions that we are unwilling to take the time and effort to understand and meet the real customer needs.

Agile Software Development with Scrum
By:
Mike Beedle, Ken Schwaber
Published:
2001

Arguably the most important book about managing technology and systems development efforts, this book describes building systems using the deceptively simple process, Scrum. Readers will come to understand a new approach to systems development projects that cuts through the complexity and ambiguity of complex, emergent requirements and unstable technology to iteratively and quickly produce quality software.

Agile Software Development: The Cooperative Game
By:
Alistair Cockburn
Published:
2001

(From the Back Cover) "Coming of age for software developers means understanding that software is a cooperative effort, not something individuals do in isolation. This is a book that teams of software developers can thrive upon, full of sensible advice for a cooperative development approach." --Tom DeMarco, The Atlantic Systems Guild

An Introduction to General Systems Thinking
By:
Gerald Weinberg
Published:
2001

For more than twenty-five years, An Introduction to General Systems Thinking has been hailed as an innovative introduction to systems theory, with applications in computer science and beyond. Used in university courses and professional seminars all over the world, the text has proven its ability to open minds and sharpen thinking.

Beyond the Myths and Magic of Mentoring
By:
Margo Murray
Published:
2001

This revised and updated edition offers step-by-step guidelines for creating a cost-effective mentoring program that will foster employee learning and growth. Shows how these programs can be rewarding for mentors and can contribute measurably to both individual and organizational performance.

Practical Software Measurement
By:
David Card, Elizabeth Clark, Joseph Dean, Fred Hall, Cheryl Jones, John McGarry, Beth Layman
Published:
2001

Practical Software Measurement (PSM) is a process for designing and implementing a project-based software measurement program. PSM provides essential information on scheduling, resource allocation, and technological performance. It enables software managers and developers to make decisions that will affect the project’s outcome positively. This book is the official, definitive guide to PSM written by the leaders of the PSM development initiative.

Quality Web Systems
By:
Elfriede A. Dustin, et al., Douglas McDiarmid, Jeff Rashka
Published:
2001

This book provides Web developers and software test professionals with practical, experience-based guidance on Web application testing. Concise and straightforward, this book provides a framework for testing Web-based applications. It offers a guide to performing test execution using several leading automated test tools, as well as insight into which test tools to use and why.

Roundtable on Project Management
By:
Marie Benesh, James Bullock, Gerald Weinberg
Published:
2001

Inspired by Jerry Weinberg's Web-based roundtable on software engineering and management--the SHAPE forum, for Software as a Human Activity Performed effectively--consultants James Bullock, Marie Benesh, and Jerry Weinberg reviewed thousands of postings and culled the most powerful, provocative points of debate. Reading this fast-paced dialogue among forty experts, software professionals will quickly benefit from the contributors' many years of combined experience.

Secrets of Consulting
By:
Gerald Weinberg, Virginia Satir
Published:
2001

From the back cover: If you are a consultant, or if you ever use a consultant, this book is for you. Gerald M. Weinberg draws on his 25 years of experience as author, lecturer, and consultant to share his secrets about the often irrational world of consulting. "The irrationality can drive consultants crazy," he writes in the book, "but if consultants can cope with it, it can also drive them rich."

Slack
By:
Tom DeMarco
Published:
2001

Another entry in the small but growing management library that suggests purposely slowing down and smelling the roses could actually boost productivity in today's 24/7 world, Tom DeMarco's Slack stands out because it is aimed at "the infernal busyness of the modern workplace." DeMarco writes, "Organizations sometimes become obsessed with efficiency and make themselves so busy that responsiveness and net effectiveness suffer." By intentionally creating downtime, or "slack," management will fin

Software Craftsmanship
By:
Pete McBreen
Published:
2001

Today’s software development projects are often based on the traditional software engineering model, which was created to develop large-scale defense projects. Projects that use this antiquated industrial model tend to take longer, promise more, and deliver less.

Software Engineering: Theory and Practice
By:
Shari Lawrence Pfleeger
Published:
2001

This introduction to software engineering and practice addresses both procedural and object-oriented development. The book applies concepts consistently to two common examples—a typical information system and a real-time system. It combines theory with real, practical applications by providing an abundance of case studies and examples from the current literature. Expanded coverage of object-oriented development — a programming perspective being implemented by many companies.

The Accidental Project Manager
By:
Patricia Ensworth
Published:
2001

Why do so many software projects fail? The reality is that many of these projects are led by programmers or developers thrown into the role of project manager without the necessary skills or training to see a project through successfully. Patricia Ensworth has written a hands-on survival guide designed to rescue the "accidental project manager" and help them to quickly ramp up on all key areas involved in software project management.

The Peopleware Papers
By:
Larry Constantine
Published:
2001

This book is about the other side of computer software, the side facing outward. This face of computing touches and is touched by people-technology people, like you and me, and ordinary people, like you and me. The essays here compiled explore the many diverse aspects of peopleware-that interface between software and its developers and between software and its users.

Under Pressure and On Time
By:
Ed Sullivan
Published:
2001

How do you hire—and keep—the best software engineers in the business? What real-world practices can really motivate a team to produce excellent results? From startups to major corporations, virtually every commercial software company struggles with building teams and shipping great software on time. Now industry expert Ed Sullivan shares the hard-won lessons and best practices from his 17-year career in software development, including six years at award-winning NuMega Technologies.

Virtual Project Management: Software Solutions for Today and the Future
By:
Paul E. McMahon
Published:
2001

Virtual Project Management: Software Solutions for Today and the Future explores the technical management issues involved in the revolutionary new way of building complex software intensive systems faster and cheaper by employing the power of distributed operations.

Winning with Software
By:
Watts Humphrey
Published:
2001

Humphrey relates the substantial benefits real organizations have obtained from such awareness and control, and he concludes with an analysis of the impressive financial returns the recommended transformations typically yield. Softcover.

77 Sure-Fire Ways to Kill a Software Project
By:
Daniel D. Ferry, Noelle Frances Ferry
Published:
2000

This book provides 77 Sure-Fire Ways to Kill a Software Project. It is a lighthearted, black sheep guide to managing software projects. Instead of forcing you to rummage through a bunch of dry software engineering texts to identify potentially damaging approaches, this book equips you with 77 tactics proven on countless projects.

Amplifying Your Effectiveness: Collected Essays
By:
James Bach, Naomi Karten, Gerald Weinberg
Published:
2000

Gerald M.Weinberg, James Bach, Naomi Karten, and numerous other successful software consultants present powerful ideas on how software engineers and managers can amplify their professional effectiveness--as individuals, as members of teams, and as members of organizations. The Collected Essays address diverse topics in personal empowerment, interpersonal interaction, mastering projects, and changing the organization.

Creating High Performance Software Development Teams
By:
Frank Ginac
Published:
2000

How to build and lead a world-class software development team! In this book, expert software development manager Frank P. Ginac brings together world-class techniques for building and leading high-performance software development teams. Ideal for the first-line manager, especially managers transitioning from developer roles. This book offers start-to-finish guidance for delivering superior products, on time and on budget.

How to Manage a Successful Software Project, 2nd Edition
By:
Sanjiv Purba, Bharat Shah
Published:
2000

The best techniques and guidelines to deliver IT projects on schedule and within budget With all the pitfalls and cost overruns that can cause a software project to come in late and over budget, managers must know the best practices in the field and how to implement them. This comprehensive guide provides you with all the tools you’ll need to deliver successful IT projects, including proven techniques, guidelines, and checklists.

How to Run Successful Projects in Web Time
By:
Fergus O'Connell
Published:
2000

No matter what high-tech field you work in, but particularly in software development, shortening project time is of vital importance in gaining a competitive advantage. Here's the how-to book that describes a radical technique for doing just that. Taking an approach adopted from the motion picture industry, this innovative resource teaches you how to utilize techniques, such as "strip boarding" that greatly reduce project time and cost.

Planning Extreme Programming
By:
Kent Beck, Martin Fowler
Published:
2000

The hallmarks of Extreme Programming--constant integration and automated testing, frequent small releases that incorporate continual customer feedback, and a teamwork approach--make it an exceptionally flexible and effective approach to software development.

Project Management
By:
Richard Murch
Published:
2000

Master project management, today's most critical business skill!

Software Engineering Processes
By:
Yingxu Wang
Published:
2000

Software engineering is playing a more important role in computing and informatics, necessitated by the complexities inherent in large-scale software development. To deal with these difficulties, the conventional lifecycle approaches to software engineering are now giving way to the "process system" approach, encompassing development methods, infrastructure, organization, and management.

Software Testing and Continuous Quality Improvement
By:
William E. Lewis
Published:
2000

This book helps accelerate the development of high quality software using continuous process improvement. The book starts with an overview of basic quality principles and how you can apply the continuous improvement cycle to software testing. It then reviews waterfall lifecycle testing, followed by an extensive RAD testing methodology for client/server and the Internet. The final section provides a comprehensive analysis of modern testing tools.

Successful Software Development, 2nd Edition
By:
Stanley Siegel, Scott E. Donaldson
Published:
2000

Introduces a model for a mature software development process that accommodates flexibility, focusing on policies and procedures that define how software development is performed, and technologies available. Tells how to sell the business case for software process improvement, how to establish dialogue between developers and customers, and how to manage multiple constituencies, personalities, and issues.

Testing IT
By:
John Watkins
Published:
2000

This pragmatic guide provides a testing framework for software professionals looking to improve product quality and to reduce timescales, effort, and cost. It covers all aspects of testing for software developed or modified in-house, modified or extended legacy systems, and software developed by a third party. The reader can customize the framework to match the particular testing requirements of any particular organization.

Testing Object-Oriented Software: Life-Cycle Solutions
By:
Imran Bashir, Amrit Goel
Published:
2000

This book presents an integrated framework for testing object-oriented software throughout the software engineering lifecycle. It discusses recipes for testing of requirements, designs, base classes, derived classes, and integrated systems. For each phase the authors describe objectives of testing, approaches used, testing techniques, ordered sets of activities, planned efforts, and acceptance criteria for transition to the next phase.

The Engineering of Software
By:
Dick Hamlet, Joe Maybee
Published:
2000

In this book, the authors provide an introduction to the essential activities involved in a software engineering project. Readers will come to understand technical skills in requirements/specification, analysis, design/implementation, and testing. These methods are treated fully, with a multitude of examples for readers to emulate.

The Rookie Manager
By:
Joseph T. Straub
Published:
2000

For all new managers who are stressed out over how they're going to handle their new responsibilities, this book is the next best thing to a Swedish massage--the perfect stress reducer.

This indispensable guide prepares inexperienced managers for the realities of today's fast-paced business environment, providing real-world information that helps readers move comfortably into their new managerial positions.

Web Project Management
By:
Ashley Friedlein
Published:
2000

This book presents a solid Web project management method for building commercial Web sites. Developed by pres.co, a leading interactive agency, this refined eight-stage approach lets you closely manage your project's contributors, quality, costs, and schedules. Importantly, the book also details how to define, measure and understand the success of your project on an ongoing basis.

Introduction to the Team Software Process
By:
Watts Humphrey
Published:
1999

The Team Software Process (TSP) details methods to guide the formation of software development teams, to motivate their work, and to enhance their productivity.

Managing Expectations: Working with People Who Want More, Better, Faster, Sooner, Now!
By:
Naomi Karten
Published:
1999

Expectations are difficult to manage and impossible to turn off. Naomi Karten offers concrete ways to manage them, and in the process, to dramatically improve the effectiveness of your services.

Peopleware: Productive Projects and Teams (2nd Edition)
By:
Tom DeMarco, Tim Lister
Published:
1999

Two of the computer industry's best-selling authors and lecturers return with a new edition of the software management book that started a revolution. With humor and wisdom drawn from years of management and consulting experience, DeMarco and Lister demonstrate that the managers ignore them at their peril. Now, with a new preface and eight new chapters, the authors enlarge upon their previous ideas and add fresh insights, examples, and anecdotes.

Software Release Methodology
By:
Michael E. Bays
Published:
1999

Don't risk your software product's success through haphazard integration and release management. This book shows you "best practices" for every stage of a successful product release: source code control, product build, testing and defect tracking, code integration, software change management, and release engineering.

Testing Safety-Related Software
By:
Stewart Gardiner
Published:
1999

This volume is based on the experiences of eight industrial and one academic partner, from fields as diverse as oil and gas production, transportation, aerospace, nuclear power, and defence. Together they have carried out an in-depth examination of the issues involved in demonstrating through testing that acceptable safety integrity levels can be achieved.

The Thinking Manager’s Toolbox
By:
William J. Altier
Published:
1999

In this indispensable book, a widely experienced business consultant provides a complete set of analytical tools essential to successful trouble-shooting, effective planning, and making better decisions faster, more confidently, and more often.

Project Management in the Fast Lane
By:
Robert C. Newbold
Published:
1998

This cutting-edge, how-to manual details proven methods for turning chronically late, over-budget and under-performing projects completely around. The author provides clear guidance on making practical and powerful changes to the way you manage projects. The book includes a complete discussion of the approach pioneered by Dr. Eli Goldratt called "Critical Chain Scheduling," the most significant new development in project scheduling in the last forty years.

Software Process Improvement: Practical Guidelines for Business Success
By:
Sami Zahran
Published:
1998

This pragmatic book discusses software process improvement and organizational benchmarking with the Capability Maturity Model (CMM), ISO 9001, and the ISO/IEC 15504 standard (SPICE & Bootstrap).

Software Project Management
By:
Walker Royce, et al.
Published:
1998

(From the Publisher )

Software Project Management presents a new management framework uniquely suited to the complexities of modern software development. Walker Royce's pragmatic perspective exposes the shortcomings of many well-accepted management priorities and equips software professionals with state-of-the-art knowledge derived from his twenty years of successful from-the-trenches project management experience.

Software Reliability Engineering
By:
J. D. Musa
Published:
1998

"Musa...is considered the guru of software reliability engineering." - Michael R. Lyn, Ph.D., Technical Staff, AT&T Laboratories. Spotlighting the practical steps that you need to apply Software Reliability Engineering to software development and testing, this first-of-its-kind guide puts the efficiency-enhancing benefits of SRE within easy reach.

Software Runaways
By:
Robert L. Glass
Published:
1998

This is a case-study book dealing with software failed projects, e.g., The Denver Airport problem. It categorizes these failed projects into the following areas: project objectives were not fully specified; projects were poorly planned; enabling project technology was not fully understood; absence of management methodology; insufficient expertise; and lack of understanding of the risks involved.

Testing Object-Oriented Software
By:
Jerry Gao, Pei Hsia, David Kung
Published:
1998

Object-Oriented programming increases software reusability, extensibility, interoperability, and reliability. Software testing aims to uncover as many programming errors as possible at a minimum cost. This book discusses those issues. A major challenge to the software engineering community remains how to reduce the cost and improve the quality of software testing.

The Psychology of Computer Programming
By:
Gerald Weinberg
Published:
1998

In this Silver Anniversary Edition, Gerald M. Weinberg updates his landmark 1971 classic with a new Preface, chapter-by-chapter commentary, and straight-from-the-heart observations on topics that affect the professional life of programmers.

The Software Project Manager’s Handbook
By:
Dwayne Phillips
Published:
1998

Written for researchers, professors, practitioners, students, and other computing professionals, this book covers: Basics that Work at Work, People, Process, and Product, Visibility, Configuration Management Process, Planning, Risk Management, Requirements, Design, Testing, Managing a Project Day by Day, Managing Software Maintenance, And more...

Visual Test 6 Bible
By:
Thomas R. Arnold
Published:
1998

Harness the power, flexibility, and new functionality of Visual Test 6 to enhance the effectiveness of your testing projects. Using concrete scenarios and detailed examples, leading Visual Test expert and veteran trainer Tom Arnold guides you through the entire test automation process - covering both the programming and project management skills needed to deliver high-quality Windows or Web-based software applications on schedule and within budget.

Death March: The Complete Software Developer’s Guide to Surviving "Mission Impossible" Projects
By:
Paul Becker, Edward Yourdon
Published:
1997

This book is intended for software developers and managers. Ed Yourdon addresses the projects that people never want to join but are often asked, cajoled, or ordered to participate in--death-march projects that are "doomed to fail." If you have ever been on one, you know what a death-march project is. This book describes the reasons these projects continue to happen, suggests which ones to avoid, and explains how to survive if you become part of one.

Managing Technical People: Innovation, Teamwork, and the Software Process
By:
Watts Humphrey
Published:
1997

In this new book, Watts Humphrey demonstrates the importance of people to the success of any software project. He focuses particularly on the critical role of innovative people, and gives concrete advice on how to identify, motivate, and organize these people into highly productive teams.

Productive Objects
By:
Robert J. Muller
Published:
1997

The increasing popularity of object-oriented programming languages, design methods, database managers, and other technologies has challenged software development project managers with a new set of rules.

Project managers need to reexamine their standard methods for planning and controlling projects to adapt to the new rules for development. This book combines the perspectives of project management and systems theory to provide a unique look at managing object-oriented projects.

Requirements Engineering: A Good Practice Guide
By:
Pete Sawyer, Ian Sommerville
Published:
1997

Requirements engineering is one facet of large project development that is often overlooked. If more effort is put into the definition and documentation of what the system is to do, the end result will be more reliable and easier to improve. Requirements need formal analysis and review before the work begins. This book provides a guide to do this in a rigid, structured manner that will produce documentation and test plans needed to design a successful system.

Software Engineering: A Practitioner’s Approach
By:
Roger Pressman
Published:
1997

This book provides a comprehensive description of software engineering including conventional development methods and advanced approaches, like object-oriented development and cleanroom software engineering. The book also addresses management issues such as project planning, risk management, quality assurance, and configuration management.

Software Failure
By:
Software Productivity Consortium, Stephen Flowers
Published:
1997

Millions of dollars are wasted and many managers' jobs are put on the line when computer systems do not live up to their expected performance, or fail outright. Concentrating on management skills and the tools needed for analysis and control, this book helps managers learn from others' mistakes to help prevent failure in their own companies.

Software Metrics: A Rigorous and Practical Approach
By:
Norman E. Fenton, Shari Lawrence Pfleeger
Published:
1997

The book has been substantially rewritten and redesigned to account for the fast-changing developments in software metrics--most notably their widespread penetration into industry practice.

All sections are updated. There are new sections on process maturity and measurement, goal-question-metric, metrics plans, experimentation, empirical studies, object-oriented metrics, and metrics tools. This book provides an accessible and comprehensive introduction to software metrics.

Software Project Survival Guide
By:
Steve McConnell
Published:
1997

This is the field guide for everyone involved in software development--especially those without formal management training. Acclaimed expert Steve McConnell maps out a proven approach to project management that you can learn and use successfully right away.

Software Projects, Evolutionary vs. Big Bang Theory
By:
Felix Redmill
Published:
1997

This book focuses on the strategic and structural aspects of software development. It deals with planning, modeling, and controlling the software development in phases. The book is for project managers, software engineers, customers, strategists, and senior managers.

Software Quality from a Business Perspective
By:
Jos Trienekens, Erik Van Veenendaal
Published:
1997

The quality of delivered software products, and the processes that develop them, are often viewed from a technical, or developer's, viewpoint. This book discusses techniques to ensure that quality and effectiveness of development include customers' views and needs.

Software Reuse
By:
Ronald J. Leach
Published:
1997

This book is the first professional-level guide in the important new field of software reuse. With the latest data on reuse, it explains the fundamental methods and metrics for successful reuse. Reuse has been called the central technical concept of the 1990s programming breakthrough: object technology. The book discusses object-oriented technologies, but goes well beyond them.

Surviving the Top Ten Challenges of Software Testing
By:
William Perry, Randall Rice
Published:
1997

This paperback book describes the authors' top challenges of software testing and illustrates the tactics testers can use to avoid "lose-lose" situations. Each challenge is outlined with an overview, state of the practice, impact on testing, solutions to the challenge, guidelines for success and a plan of action. The summary chapter is a plan of action to improve testing, followed by four pages of resources.

Testing Client/Server Systems
By:
Kelley C. Bourne
Published:
1997

This book attempts to show the differences between (1) traditional mainframe development and its related testing, and (2) Client/Server rapid-development models and their testing concerns. The book provides many interesting insights into Client/Server and what aspects require testing. It is apparent that the author has a strong development background and is not as well founded in testing and QA concepts.

The Deadline
By:
Tom DeMarco
Published:
1997

With his first software novel, Tom DeMarco delivers a highly entertaining and subtly educational book all about project management. The plot centers around Mr. Tompkins, a downsized project manager who is kidnapped and whisked away to the fantasy Republic of Morovia. There, he is asked to manage a huge staff of developers to deliver six software products with impossible deadlines. Using different size teams and different methods, Mr.

Effective Project Management Through Applied Cost & Schedule Control
By:
James Bent, Kenneth Humphreys
Published:
1996

This unique reference interweaves information on the three major overlapping parts of the total project program: programs (defined as techniques, procedures, and methods), people skills (defined as experience, application, and analytical ability), and the culture of project groups (defined as project commitment and working togetherness).

Managing a Programming Project: People and Processes
By:
John Boddie, Philip Metzger
Published:
1996

This premier guide to managing software development has been updated in this third edition to account for increases in computer power, the use of software development tools, and object-oriented environments.

Object-Oriented Software Testing: A Hierarchical Approach
By:
Shel Siegel
Published:
1996

This outstanding guide covers the object-oriented testing techniques that will help you achieve the following goals: reusability, higher quality and lower development costs.

Quality Software Management, Volume 4
By:
Gerald Weinberg
Published:
1996

This is volume four in a four-volume set. This book focuses on how to create the environment necessary to implement the processes and concepts described in the previous three volumes. The key focus is getting the required support and environment in place to support process improvement.

Rapid Development
By:
Steve McConnell
Published:
1996

If you wrestle with development mileposts and deadlines, this book can show you the tested strategies and tactics you need to keep your projects on time and on budget. In the tradition of McConnell`s bestselling Code Complete, this book brings together the best research and hard-won experience to help you get control of your development projects.

Rise and Resurrection of the American Programmer
By:
Edward Yourdon
Published:
1996

This book treats many facets of our industry: social issues, programmers and careers, current and new technology, trends, future predictions, the Internet, Java, Microsoft, good-enough software, and even intelligent milk cartons and toothbrushes.

Risk Management Processes for Software Engineering Models
By:
Marian Myerson
Published:
1996

This book shows how applying risk management to each stage of the software engineering model can help the entire development process run on time and on budget. Starting with a concise overview of quality software, it identifies the potential threats associated with software development, explains how to establish an effective risk-management program, and details the six critical steps involved in applying the process.

Software Change Impact Analysis
By:
Robert S. Arnold, Shawn A. Bohner
Published:
1996

This book provides up-to-date information on determining which software parts affect each other. It provides a lot of ideas for doing impact analysis better, presents a framework for the field, and focuses attention on important results.

Software Testing in the Real World
By:
Edward Kit
Published:
1996

The software testing process is the way in which people, tools, methods, measurements, and equipment are integrated to test a software product. This book offers a toolbox for the practical implementation of the testing process and how to improve it. Based on real-world issues and examples, it brings together the key methods of software testing with practical implementation techniques, and presents a simple, highly practical approach to those getting started.

Statistical Methods for Software Quality
By:
Adrian Burr, Mal Owen
Published:
1996

The authors describe the statistical techniques currently available for managing and controlling the quality of software during specification, design, production, and maintenance. The book includes real-world case studies. The statistical theory presented is designed to be comprehensible to those with a minimum of mathematical knowledge. It will be invaluable to practitioners and to students of software engineering.

Technical Risk Management
By:
Jack V. Michaels
Published:
1996

Technical Risk Management is at the forefront of skills dedicated to achieving affordable quality. Based on proven techniques developed over decades of experience, and bearing the endorsement of Norman R. Augustine, Chairman and CEO of Martin Marietta Corp., this book provides the tools needed to bring quality products to the marketplace on time and within budget.

Constantine on Peopleware
By:
Larry Constantine
Published:
1995

Constantine on Peopleware presents more than thirty essays and articles. Larry Constantine draws on diverse experiences as an educator, family therapist, and systems expert. He covers a broad range of issues, including quality and productivity, teamwork, group dynamics, personality and programming, project management and organizational issues, interface design and human-machine interaction, cognition, psychology, and thought processes.

How to Implement Information Systems and Live to Tell About It
By:
Howard Fallon
Published:
1995

This book addresses the specifics of implementation by providing detailed steps for middle managers who need to acquire organization and management skills for coordinating a successful implementation project. It explains exactly how to execute a complex information system even when it crosses many organizational boundaries and hardware platforms.

Object Solutions: Managing the Object-Oriented Project
By:
Grady Booch
Published:
1995

In this book, the author mainly refers to the management aspects. That is why there is no deep theoretical or detailed technical material. There is an attempt to describe, in plain English, all related issues, and to introduce terminology, ideas, and techniques. The book contains a rich catalog of situations, practices, recommendations, and rules.

Safer C: Developing Software for High-Integrity and Safety-Critical Systems
By:
Les Hatton
Published:
1995

There are a growing number of users today who are turning to C for safety-critical development and many safety-critical systems are being written in C. However, there is no guidance available for the use of C in safety related work. This book provides developers and programmers with an essential critique of existing standards initiatives for safety critical development and an in-depth critique of the C language from a safety viewpoint.

Safeware
By:
Nancy Leveson
Published:
1995

We are building systems today--and using computers to control them—which have the potential for large-scale destruction of life and environment. More than ever, software engineers and system developers, as well as their managers, must understand the issues and develop the skills needed to anticipate and prevent accidents before they occur. Professionals should not require a catastrophe to happen before taking action.

Software Assessment
By:
Michael A Friedman, Jeffrey M. Voas
Published:
1995

This book offers a balanced presentation of theory and practice. Featuring exhaustive coverage of the foundations of reliability, safety, and testability, it uses real-world examples, illustrations, and clear descriptions to explore all of the latest techniques for assessing those qualities.

Software Evaluation for Certification
By:
Andrew K. Rae, Philippe Robert
Published:
1995

(no abstract available)

Software Testing: A Craftsman’s Approach 1st Edition
By:
Paul C. Jorgensen
Published:
1995

Software Testing offers an up-to-date synthesis of information in the field of software testing. It is the only text to bring together the two fundamental approaches--functional and structural--with numerous practical examples and exercises. The material provides the basis for making well-informed choices regarding appropriate techniques. Part I focuses on the mathematics needed to understand and correctly apply the two fundamental approaches.

Systems Management for Information Technology and Software Engineering
By:
Andrew Sage
Published:
1995

This book on systems management discusses important concerns for the development of systems from the perspective of information technology, information systems, and software systems engineering. It focuses on the systems management of processes for information technology and software development organizations.

The Capability Maturity Model
By:
Mary Beth Chrissis, Bill Curtis, Marc C. Paulk, Charles V. Weber
Published:
1995

This book provides a description and technical overview of the CMM, along with guidelines for improving software process management in general. It is a sequel to Watts Humphrey's work Managing the Software Process in that it structures the maturity framework presented in that book more formally.

The Craft of Software Testing
By:
Brian Marick
Published:
1995

This reference presents, in detail, an effective, step-by-step, cost-effective approach to software testing, which is based on common practice, with improvements inspired by academic testing research and practical experience. The approach is designed to be gradually adoptable, so that it does not disrupt current work. It scales down gracefully under schedule pressure.

The Mythical Man-Month
By:
Fred Brooks
Published:
1995

Few books on software project management have been as influential and timeless as this one. With a blend of software engineering facts and thought-provoking opinions, Fred Brooks offers insight for anyone managing complex projects.

Why Does Software Cost So Much?
By:
Tom DeMarco
Published:
1995

This is a delightful collection of essays (most previously published) dealing with various software issues. Even though this book doesn't try to instruct the reader in any particular subject, such as configuration management or software measurement, most readers will gain a better understanding of several facets of software development. Unlike most books with the word "software" in the title, this book is fun to read, and you can actually read it from cover to cover in one sitting.

Debugging The Development Process: Practical Strategies for Staying Focused, Hitting Ship Dates, and Building Solid Teams
By:
Steve Maguire
Published:
1994

The author of the award-winning Writing Solid Code takes a compelling look at the people who develop the code and the group dynamics behind the scenes. Steve Maguire draws on his real-world experiences at Microsoft for candid accounts of how he brought together and maintained effective teams to develop timely, high-quality commercial applications.

Managing Software Maniacs: Finding, Managing, and Rewarding a Winning Development Team
By:
Ken Whitaker
Published:
1994

From a review by Ed Yourdon in the June '94 American Programmer- "If you're managing the development of PC based software projects or if you're in the midst of a client-server project with a bunch of C++ programmers who just don't seem to behave the way those old COBOL mainframers used to, this book is for you.

Risk Management for Software Projects
By:
Peter Absolon, Michael Coleman, Alex Down
Published:
1994

This book is recommended reading for anyone in software development who has to honor a commitment. It examines the characteristics of risk in general and emphasizes the creative nature of such analysis. The coverage then turns to the establishment of an "optimum risk environment" and shows the reader how to manage this at every stage through successful project conclusion.

Show-stopper!
By:
Zachary G. Pascal
Published:
1994

This is the inside story of the development of Windows NT. NT took five years and $150 million to complete. For much of that time, the massive program demanded the attention of more than 200 testers, writers and technicians. This book tells the tale and lays bare the messy, wrenching reality of large scale software innovation.

Software Quality Assurance
By:
Jake Ansell
Published:
1994

From the preface - The aim of this book lies in the integrated exposition of four aspects of quality assurance (planning administration, construction, analysis and psychological orientation) which form the framework for all kinds of quality assurance projects.

Software Testing (The McGraw Hill Int’l Software Quality Assurance)
By:
Marc Roper
Published:
1994

A basic book beginning with a general survey of the role of software testing and a number of testing methods including statement, dataflow, and domain testing along with the tools to support them.

Usability Engineering
By:
Jakob Nielsen
Published:
1994

There are two factors that make the usability of software one of the most important issues today. Both of them are closely related to the current growth of Internet technologies: (1) The quantity of software users and software products being produced and released to the market is growing exponentially; and (2) The "average software user" is more and more inexperienced.

Usability Testing and System Evaluation
By:
Lindgaard Gitte
Published:
1994

The author (from Telecom Australia) describes particular tools, usability testing, and evaluation procedures. Most of these have been derived from behavioral and social science, but have been updated specifically to the human-computer interaction environment. Numerous examples show how and when the tools can be used most effectively.

Practical Implementation of Software Metrics
By:
Paul Goodman
Published:
1993

Goodman's book claims to be written specifically to help organizations successfully introduce software metrics programs. The book is easy to read and is certainly recommended as an introduction to starting a measurement process.

Software Process Quality
By:
Hsiang-Tao Yeh
Published:
1993

For anyone responsible for designing, creating, programming, or managing a software system, this book offers a basic guide to achieve significant improvement in the quality and productivity of the systems. It explains how to control individual processes that span the software lifecycle with process-quality metrics and quantitative modeling.

Software Requirements: Objects, Functions, and States
By:
Alan Davis
Published:
1993

This book focuses on the early phases of the software development lifecycle. The author discusses the latest research results from the requirements arena and examines techniques that will lend themselves to your particular problem. Each technique is followed by a case study illustrating how that technique can be applied to three real problems. The book is recommended for the practicing systems engineer, software analyst, or requirements writer.

The Healthy Software Project
By:
Mark Norris, Malcolm Payne, Peter Rigby
Published:
1993

This collection of software-project cases details potential barriers to success, explains how to preempt problems, and how to correct mistakes. Examples from actual software projects illustrate a range of poor, satisfactory, and successful endeavors. With the lessons learned on these past projects, you'll build a profile of the healthy project that will ensure the success of future efforts.

Practical Software Metrics for Project Management and Process Improvement
By:
Robert B. Grady
Published:
1992

This excellent book lives up to its title in delivering practical and application-oriented advice for project and process managers. The book highlights Hewlett Packard’s experiences using software metrics, incorporates more than seventy charts and graphs from real projects, and shows how the metrics can be rolled up into useful and workable organization indicators. The book includes a good bibliography.

Risk: Analysis, Assessment, Management
By:
Frank Wharton, Jake Ansell
Published:
1992

This book is a collection of 13 articles, mostly from the UK, which highlight some of the more important and difficult aspects of risk management in a variety of contexts. Organizations struggle to survive by using new technologies and marketing new products which may put at risk employees, customers, shareholders, society, the environment, and our ecosystem. All aspects of risk analysis, assessment and management are addressed, extending from methodology to ethics.

Testing Very Big Systems
By:
David Marks
Published:
1992

This book examines some of the difficulties associated wth testing large systems (defined as 3 million LOC and up), but is also useful for developers and testers of smaller systems. Topics include testing methodology, documentation, metrics, and management.

The Cleanroom Approach to Quality Software Development
By:
Michael Dyer
Published:
1992

This is the first book on the "cleanroom" approach to building software. The book outlines what the cleanroom process is and reports on experiences using it in industrial strength projects. Managers and practitioners will find the book worthwhile and stimulating. It is a must for anyone who plans to seriously introduce or experiment with the cleanroom ideas.

Quality Assurance for Information Systems
By:
William Perry
Published:
1991

This book is an expanded version and new edition of what used to be called Effective Methods of EDP Quality Assurance. New chapters include coverage verification, validation, testing techniques, maintenance, QA for the personal computer, and measuring reliability. With its appendices the book now extends over 800 pages and is hard to digest. The book contains a sample QA manual as an appendix. The book is worthwhile for the dedicated QA specialist or organization.

Software Engineering Risk Analysis and Management
By:
Robert Charette
Published:
1991

From the preface, “…this book describes the field of risk analysis and management, how it is performed, and provides an identification of the areas of risk in the building of software systems”.

Software Sizing and Estimating
By:
M. C. R. Symons
Published:
1991

Organizations using or considering function points as a tool for project sizing and estimating should take a look at this book. Featuring case studies of actual applications, it provides a step-by-step guide for the new Mk II FP estimating method.

The Art of Computer Systems Performance Analysis
By:
Jain Raj
Published:
1991

This is the best book available on the special topic of performance analysis. Jain has a considerable base of industry experience to draw on as he discusses modeling, simulation, and analysis methods for a variety of systems including networks, database management systems, and distributed systems. The book assumes substantial statistical background from the reader and can be pretty tough to plow through. It includes a good case study from Digital Equipment Corporation.

Are Your Lights On?
By:
Donald Gause, Gerald Weinberg
Published:
1990

The fledgling problem solver invariably rushes in with solutions before taking time to define the problem being solved. Even experienced solvers, when subjected to social pressure, yield to this demand for haste. When they do, many solutions are found, but not necessarily to the problem at hand.

Making Software Development Visible: Effective Project Control
By:
David P. Youll
Published:
1990

This management-oriented book focuses on the basics of project visibility: plans, schedule, deliverables, quality. Many samples of plots and trend graphs covering these topics are included for illustration. The book does not contain hard measurement data but does provide the beginning project manager with good ideas for what should be measured and how to present it.

Managing Software Development Projects: Formula for Success
By:
Neal Whitten
Published:
1990

We recommend many books on the management of projects. This offering has a fresh and easy-to-read tone that earned our endorsement as an introductory project-management primer.

Software Acquisition Management
By:
John Marciniak, Donald Reifer
Published:
1990

A unique treatment, this book is designed to provide real answers to software acquisition managment--the processes of acquiring, via formal agreement with the developer (contract), software that has to be developed or has a rather large content requiring development.

Software Project Management for Small to Medium Sized Projects
By:
John Rakos
Published:
1990

Based on the method used successfully at Digital Equipment Corporation, this volume details the time-phased approach to software development for project managers working with mini- or microcomputers.

Software Reviews and Audits Handbook
By:
Charles Hollocker
Published:
1990

This comprehensive book incorporates the perspective of the IEEE standards (Hollocker chaired the effort that produced the ANSI/lEEE Standard for Software Reviews and Audits). The book has fresh material with good coverage of software audits and an emphasis on the use of audits for what Hollocker refers to as a "controlled process evolution." The human side of reviews is not emphasized. The book’s 130-page appendix contains sample checklists, forms, and report documents.

Software Testing Techniques
By:
Boris Beizer
Published:
1990

This book presents a collection of test techniques, many of which are based on the author's firsthand experience as Director of Testing and Quality Assurance for a telecommunications software producer. It describes various techniques (decision tables and formal grammars) that provide precise specification-driven testing.

Strategies for Software Engineering
By:
Martyn A. Ould
Published:
1990

The book focuses on two processes that the author refers to as "technical planning" and "quality planning." They are designed to lead the manager through a technical assessment of the problem to be solved and to proceed from that to the formulation of a traditional resource plan.

Wicked Problems, Righteous Solutions
By:
Peter Degrace, Leslie Stahl
Published:
1990

This is a very provocative book that should be read by anyone working in the field and concerned with software processes and methods. The book provides a thorough challenge to the Waterfall methodology and offers a lot of fresh material and insight about other ways of organizing and conducting software development. Wicked problems (the problems are fully understood after they're solved) are defined and explored effectively.

Understanding the Professional Programmer
By:
Gerald Weinberg
Published:
1988

Organized as a collection of essays about programming, this is another Weinberg classic. If you are a programmer, or manage programmers, or indeed just associate with programmers, this is a book for you.

Managing Programming People, A Personal View
By:
Philip Metzger
Published:
1987

It’s often assumed that anyone can be a good manager if they really try. Frequently, technicians are made managers because it’s assumed they can do the job as well as they could do technical work. Metzger spells out the fallacy in this thinking and explains in detail how a technician (or anyone else) can learn to be a manager of programming people.

Software Product Assurance
By:
William L. Bryan, Stanley Siegel
Published:
1987

(From the Back Cover) Based on the authors' extensive experience in the software industry, this volume describes and extensively illustrates practical techniques for transforming any software development endeavor into a visible, traceable, and hence manageable process.

Software Reliability
By:
A. Iannino, J. D. Musa, K. Okumoto
Published:
1987

This book grew out of an internal class taught at AT&T Bell Laboratories. The authors also gained experience and insight by testing and refining the book’s ideas on a large number of software projects at AT&T. If offers the best coverage of reliability models and measurement we have seen. Examples and case-study problems are sprinkled liberally throughout, which help the reader understand some of the more theoretical material.

Software Configuration Management (Babich)
By:
Wayne Babich
Published:
1986

Software testing and software configuration management are usually thought of as two distinct functions within the software engineering discipline, but without good configuration management, the software testing effort frequently flounders. In this book, Babich clearly spells out the most common problems in configuration management and offers some down-to-earth solutions.

The Politics of Projects
By:
Robert Block
Published:
1986

A frequently overlooked aspect of successfully fielding viable systems is politics. Robert Block examines the internal and external forces brought to bear on project managers and discusses ways to cope with them.

Software System Testing and Quality Assurance
By:
Boris Beizer
Published:
1984

A comprehensive guide that shows you how to create and maintain reliable, robust, high-quality software. Using nontechnical, easy-to-understand language, the book runs the gamut from unit testing to system testing. Quality assurance checklists guide you.

Software Engineering Economics
By:
Barry W. Boehm
Published:
1981

This book is an excellent reference work on software measurement. Heavy emphasis is on estimating--including an in-depth explanation of the COCOMO model. Even though this book was published almost ten years ago, it is still one of the most quoted books on the subject of software measurement.

Software Verification and Validation, Realistic Project Approaches
By:
Michael S. Deutsch
Published:
1981

(no abstract available)

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