STAREAST 2010 - Software Testing Conference

PRESENTATIONS

By
Randy Rice, Rice Consulting Services

This session is a deeper examination of how to apply dashboards in software testing.I spent several months on a project primarily building a software testing dashboard. I have learned some interesting things, including:

  • Resources for free examples
  • Tools to help build dashboards
  • The human issues
By
Matthew Heusser, Socialtext

It seemed simple enough-hire the best available technical staff that would work from home to build some great software. Along the way, the team encountered the usual problems: time zone differences, communication headaches, and a surprising regression test monster.

By
Elisabeth Hendrickson, Quality Tree Software, Inc.

Teams that succeed with agile methods reliably deliver releasable software at frequent intervals and at a sustainable pace. At the same time, they can readily adapt to the changing needs and requirements of the business. Unfortunately, not all teams are successful in their attempt to transition to agile and, instead, end up with a "frAgile" process. The difference between an agile and a frAgile process is usually in the degree to which the organization embraces the disciplined engineering practices that support agility.

By
Peter Kruse, Berner & Mattner Systemtechnik GmbH

The basic problem in software testing is choosing a subset from the near infinite number of possible test cases. Testers must select test cases to design, create, and then execute. Often, test resources are limited-but you still want to select the best possible set of tests. Peter M. Kruse and Magdalena Luniak share their experiences designing test cases with the Classification-Tree Editor (CTE XL), the most popular tool for systematic black-box test case design of classification tree-based tests.

By
C.V. Narayanan, Sonata Software Ltd.

One of the major challenges confronting traditional testers in agile environments is that requirements are incrementally defined rather than specified at the start. Testers must adapt to this new reality to survive and excel in agile development. C.V. Narayanan explains the Acceptance Test-Driven Development (ATDD) process that helps testers tackle this challenge. He describes how to create acceptance test checkpoints, develop regression tests for these checkpoints, and identify ways to mitigate risks with ATDD.

By
Robert Sabourin, AmiBug.com

Charters help you guide and focus exploratory testing. Well-formed charters help testers find defects that matter and provide vital information to stakeholders about the quality and state of the software under test. Rob Sabourin shares his experiences defining different exploratory testing charters for a diverse group of test projects. For example, reconnaissance charters focus on discovering application features, functions, and capabilities; failure mode charters explore what happens to applications when something goes wrong.

By
Bob Galen, iContact

Many test leaders believe that development, business, and management don't understand, support, or properly value our contributions. You know what-these test leaders are probably right! So, why do they feel that way? Bob Galen believes it’s our inability and ineffectiveness in communicating-selling-ourselves, our abilities, our contributions, and our value to the organization. As testers, we believe that the work speaks for itself. Wrong! We must work harder to create the crucial conversations that communicate our value and impact.

By
Nat Couture, Professional Quality Assurance Ltd.

Is your organization releasing applications that target multiple mobile devices, platforms, or browsers? If so, you have faced-or soon will face-the challenge of choosing and setting up a test environment for these devices and platforms. Nat Couture shows how to develop a cost-effective application test environment to mitigate the risks associated with deploying mobile applications.

By
Doron Reuveni, uTest

With new mobile applications for Blackberry, iPhone, and Android battling for media attention and consumer dollars, the pressure to get applications built, tested, and launched has never been greater. Getting high-quality apps to market quickly can make or break a product or company. However, the testing methods that work for Web and desktop apps (e.g., in-house QA, outsourcing, emulators/simulators, and beta testers) do not meet the extreme testing needs of mobile apps.

By
Sean Stolberg, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Continuous integration is one of the key processes that support an agile software development and testing environment. Sean Stolberg describes how a traditional software tester-transitioning to an agile development environment-put a continuous integration infrastructure in place. In doing so, he helped improve development practices and made possible his team’s transition to agile testing. Sean discusses his team’s initial motivations for adopting agile development practices and dives into the nuts-and-bolts implementation details.

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