STAREAST 2013 - Software Testing Conference

PRESENTATIONS

By
Paul Carvalho, STAQS

Finding time to test the basic functionality, performance, and security of a system is difficult enough, so how do you find time to add internationalization (i18n) and localization (l10n) testing? Today’s world is very small, and you may already have international users in your target market.

By
Jon Bach, eBay, Inc.

Stakeholders always want to release when they think we’ve finished testing. They believe we have discovered “all of the important problems” and “verified all of the fixes”—and now it’s time to reap the rewards. However, as testers we still can assist in improving software by learning about...

By
Hans Buwalda, LogiGear

Large-scale testing projects severely stress “normal” testing practices. This can result in a number of less than optimal results. A number of innovative ideas and concepts have emerged to support industrial-strength testing of large and complex projects—some successful and others not...

By
Jon Bach, eBay, Inc.

At testing conferences, many presentations mention techniques and processes meant to help you find bugs, but few talk about what to do when you find one. If it’s as simple as writing what you saw, how do you know that’s the real problem? What do you do when you find a bug but the developer...

By
Janet Gregory, DragonFire, Inc.

On traditional projects, testers usually join the project after coding has started, or even later when coding is almost finished. Testers have no role in advising the project team early regarding quality issues but focus only on finding defects. They become accustomed to this style of...

By
Michael Stahl, Intel

Most test automation projects never die—they just become a mess and are redone. Initial solutions that start well and are full of promise often end up as brittle and unmaintainable monsters consuming more effort than they save. Political feuds can flourish as different automation solutions...

By
Paul Holland, Testing Thoughts

To assist in risk analysis, prioritization of testing, and test reporting (telling your testing story), you need a thorough Test Coverage Outline (TCO)—a road map of your proposed testing activities. By creating a TCO, you can prepare for testing without having to create a giant pile of...

By
Michael Bolton, DevelopSense

Software testing is a highly technical, logical, rational task. There's no place for squishy emotional stuff here—not among professional testers. Or is there? Because of commitment, risk, schedule, and money, emotions often do run high in software development and testing. Our ideas about...

By
Pascal Dufour, codecentric

Traditional processes have required testers to create a large amount of documentation in the form of test plans, test cases, and test reports. It’s time to think differently. Creating test artifacts in the “old school” textual style takes too much time away from actual testing. 

By
Allan Wagner, IBM Software—Rational

The ability to rapidly release new product features is vital to the success of today’s businesses. To accelerate development, teams are adopting agile practices and leveraging service-oriented architectures to integrate legacy applications with other systems. At the same time, testing...

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