STARWEST 2001 - Software Testing Conference

PRESENTATIONS

By
Alan Haffenden, The Open Group

What do we mean when we say local, remote, simultaneous, and distributed testing? Alan Haffenden of The Open Group explores the differences, and explains why the architecture of a distributed test execution system must be different from that of non-distributed systems. An overview of POSIX 1003.13 profiles and units of functionality helps advanced users build a good foundation for testing both their real-time and embedded systems.

By
Andrew O. Mellinger, Critical Path Software

This presentation gives one team's experience installing and testing a multiserver eCommerce system that had storefronts that were to be created by the customer.

By
James Speer, VeriTest

Testers have taken a lead role in providing disabled persons access to computer resources. On behalf of the nearly twenty percent of Americans with disabilities, companies are now improving the accessibility of their Web sites, hardware, and software products. This presentation describes the regulatory framework for accessibility issues and suggests approaches for testing a range of accessibility aids including screen readers, voice recognition software, refreshable Braille terminals, and alternative point-and-click devices.

By
Jim Hyatt, Spherion

This session walks participants through the process of Web load testing. Jim Hyatt takes this opportunity to cover everything from what testing tools are available to how to plan for load testing. Get a basic understanding of what Web load testing is and how to do it correctly.

By
Dan Downing, Mentora

Dan Downing's experience with stress testing projects has revealed a handful of common denominators present in most Web site performance problems. These include memory starvation; a CPU-gobbling database access; improperly sized heaps, caches, and pools; poor application design; and load balancing that doesn't balance. This presentation uses actual B2C and B2B project examples to show you a symptom-measurement-diagnostic approach to understanding, exposing, and documenting these common problems.

By
Elisabeth Hendrickson, Quality Tree Software

This presentation is about bugs: where they hide, how you find them, and how you tell other people they exist so they can be fixed. Explore the habitats of the most common types of software bugs. Learn how to make bugs more likely to appear and discover ways to present information about the bugs you find to ensure they get fixed. Drawing on real-world examples of bug reports, Elisabeth Hendrickson reveals tips and techniques for capturing the wiliest and most squirmy critters crawling around in your software.

By
Elizabeth Langston, SAS Institute Inc.

The earth is flat. Mankind will never fly. Reasonable people believed these “facts” for
thousands of years, but advances in knowledge and technology proved them wrong. Does the software testing industry have any such "facts"? In this paper, Elizabeth Langston will explore common testing beliefs. Using experiences from SAS, she attempts to confirm or refute these pieces of conventional wisdom.

By
Gerhard Strobel, IBM Germany

There's a need for standardized, organized hardware and software infrastructure, and for a common framework, in a complex test environment. Gerhard Strobel focuses on the experience of testing diverse products on many different platforms (UNIX, Windows, OS2, z/OS, OS400)-how they differ and how much they have in common. He explains how to configure and profile test machines, then highlights the technical areas where test efficiency can be increased. He also covers methods of execution control.

By
Rex Black, Rex Black Consulting Services, Inc.

The four "lucky" organizational factors are: clearly defined roles within-and interfaces between-test team and project; early test team involvement in project; sharing of test cases, data, and tools across test participants and phases (levels); and a project culture that promotes understanding and valuing test team's contributions. How do these factors promote test success? How can we institute these auspicious circumstances on our projects?

By
Eric Patel, Nokia Home Communications

With more and more companies realizing the need for testing throughout the product development process, there's a growing demand for bigger, better QA teams. If you find yourself the first member of a newly formed department, it's likely you'll be asked to do the testing and build the team simultaneously. This presentation presents a strategy for meeting the day-to-day testing challenges, while planning for the future of the department. It tells you how you can lay the foundation and build the house-all at the same time.

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