Learn to Empathize When Dealing with Conflict: An Interview with Tricia Broderick

[interview]

TB: Almost always, “I had no idea; that's not why I did it. I didn't mean to make you angry or hurt your feelings.” “That wasn't why I did it” often comes up.

JV: “If I would have known then how you would feel, I would have rephrased my words a little bit differently.”

TB: Absolutely.

JV: In closing for this interview, what sort of trends are you seeing in project management for this upcoming year? 

TB: For project management as a whole, you see a lot of articles out there highlighting, "Let's get rid of managers." If you read the articles closely, it's really awesome, because it's "Let's get right of managers. Let's get leaders." There's nothing more that I want to see in the community. I think the more time we spend as project managers being leaders, the more results we're going to have from high-performing teams and from results to delivery to value with the customers, and what the results are going to be.

One trend I see at least is how we start making sure that the tools that we use support us as leaders to support our teams, not just to manage our teams. I almost want to change the title from project managers to project leaders.

JV: Finally, do you have any New Year's resolutions? 

TB: I think what I probably am going to focus the most on this year, and this session is one of them, is continuing to pay it forward to the community that I've learned so much from. In my paying it forward to be really honest about the uglier side at times of this learning, to not just get up and say, "Here's the perfect way to do it." but, "Here are some of the ways to do it, and how I learned to get there." Giving some of those failures and, really, the awesome growth parts of those sessions when I pay it forward. That's probably my New Year's resolution and what I'm targeting for the New Year.

JV: Very cool. Alright, Tricia. Thank you so much for talking to us today.

TB: Thank you.

 

TriciaTricia Broderick is an agile leaning facilitator at Santeon Group. With sixteen years of experience—the last six focused on agile principles—her passion for mentoring and coaching has been essential in successfully transitioning from manager to agile leader. Recently, Tricia’s team summarized her leadership by noting that she knows just when to guide someone out of the comfort zone while continuously providing support and encouragement.

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Jonathan Vanian's picture Jonathan Vanian

Jonathan Vanian is an online editor who edits, writes, interviews, and helps turn the many cranks at StickyMinds, TechWell, AgileConnection, and CMCrossroads. He has worked for newspapers, websites, and a magazine, and is not as scared of the demise of the written word as others may appear to be. Software and high technology never cease to amaze him.

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