agile

Articles

An Introductory Acceptance Test

"If you don't know where you are going, you will wind up somewhere else." Yogi Berra

This article is an excerpt from Ken Pugh’s upcoming book – “Lean-Agile Acceptance Test Driven Development” to be published by Addison-Wesley. Debbie, the developer, and Tom, the tester, are introducing acceptance test-driven development to Cathy, the customer.

The Triad – Tom, Debbie, and Cathy – are in their second meeting together. Debbie describes an example of an acceptance test and four ways that an acceptance test can be executed.

 

Ken Pugh's picture Ken Pugh
Agile Developer’s Journal: A Day in the Life

People are creatures of habit, particularly programmers: We seek consistency, whether it is the tried-and-true waterfall/SDLC method or our morning routine of reading the newspaper with a hot cup of coffee. Companies or projects looking to adopt an agile process neglect the fundamental concern of an individual developer: "What will my day to day look like working in an agile environment?"

Geoffrey Bourne's picture Geoffrey Bourne
The "One Right Way"

For those who believe there has to be one right way to do something, especially in software development - there can be. But that one way isn't likely to come from a single individual. Through collaboration and teamwork, some of the greatest single ideas have evolved.

Lisa Crispin's picture Lisa Crispin
Create and Maintain Product Roadmaps using Agile Principles

Anupam Kundu describes an agile-enabled framework for product managers, project portfolio managers, and IT executives to develop and maintain a dynamic and flexible product roadmap. The product wing of the digital division of a publishing house adopted this collaborative framework to to charter their product roadmap and simultaneously enable their project team to see and understand the “big picture”.

Anupam Kundu's picture Anupam Kundu
Agile Performance Testing

Approaching performance testing with a rigid plan and narrow specialization often leads to testers' missing performance problems or to prolonged performance troubleshooting. By making the process more agile, the efficiency of performance testing increases significantly—and that extra effort usually pays off multi-fold, even before the end of performance testing.

Alexander Podelko's picture Alexander Podelko
Tracking what Matters with Burn Down Charts

Burn down charts help agile development teams track sprint and release progress. The basic idea of a burn down chart is that the team starts with estimates for all of the tasks in the sprint, and then on daily (or more frequent) basis re-estimates the amount of work remaining.

Steve Berczuk's picture Steve Berczuk
Empowering Self-Organization and Energizing Project Planning with the Commander's Intent

Things change, and when they do, it's best to be ready to change with them. The best plans are doomed to fail if they aren't malleable. In this column, George Schlitz and Giora Morein take a look at the military concept of "Commander's Intent" and how it can apply to non-military project planning.

George Schlitz's picture George Schlitz Giora Morein
Mocks and Making Tests Easier to Read

There has been a lot of recent discussion on Twitter about the use of mocking frameworks and writing readable tests. Here is a roundup of some of the recent blogs on the subject.

Making Tests More Readable

Daniel Wellman's picture Daniel Wellman
Rocks into Gold: Part 3

This short book by Clarke Ching is a "biztech" parable for software developers who want to survive—and then thrive—through the credit crunch. We have republished the book in a four-part series. In part three, when things seem at their very worst, Bob has a "light bulb moment" that just might save the day. Follow the story as our characters fight to keep their jobs by implementing creative business ideas and management skills taken from agile development.

Clarke Ching's picture Clarke Ching
The Decline and Fall of Agile SCM—and the Rise of Lean SCM

There are definite signs of Agile methods (with a capital A) may be losing mind share or, at the very least, suffering from a certain amount of perhaps over-hype or over familiarity. Or maybe it is just the rise in cases of AFS (Agile Fatigue Syndrome). For some, agile is giving away to the rise of lean software development. Where will it end?

Pages

AgileConnection is one of the growing communities of the TechWell network.

Featuring fresh, insightful stories, TechWell.com is the place to go for what is happening in software development and delivery.  Join the conversation now!