agile

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Dissecting the Product Owner role

Like Coach and Scrum Master the Product Owner is a new term for a new role. While Coach and Scrum Master are completely new roles added by Agile methods the Product Owner is an extension of an existing role. Or rather, it is an extension to two existing roles.

The role of Product Owner was introduced by Scrum. Teams following XP prefer to talk about a Customer. What ever the role is called it is concerned with: deciding what should be in the next iteration, prioritising work, providing guidance on what is being built and ensuring value is created.

Allan Kelly's picture Allan Kelly
An Agile Approach To Retail: A Data Intrinsic Development Case Study

Agile software development challenges traditional software development approaches. Rapidly changing environments characterized by evolving requirements and tight schedules require software developers to take an agile approach. These methods include practices such as short iterations, frequent releases, simple and emerging design, peer review, and on-site customer participation.

 

Dinesh  Mohata's picture Dinesh Mohata
How Agile Practices Reduce Requirements Risks

Requirements risks are among the most insidious risks threatening software projects. Whether it is having unclear requirements, lack of customer involvement in requirements development, or defective requirements, these troubles are a major culprit in projects that go awry. As requirements expert and agile coach Ellen Gottesdiener explains, agile practice can go a long way in mitigating those risks.

Ellen ellensqe's picture Ellen ellensqe
Postmodernism in Software Development

Recent history has ushered in the postmodern era in all its fragmented glory. With its arrival comes the displacement of the absolute, the certain, and all that characterizes the modern age. Along with changes in art, politics, and philosophy— there are reverberations in business and technology. The societal shift from Modernism to Postmodernism mirrors and reinforces a shift in software development from traditional waterfall to non-linear Agile methods.

Ryan  Fogarty's picture Ryan Fogarty
Timing Matters in Managing Change

Implementing change can be a colossal challenge. People tend to prefer what's familiar, safe, and predictable to that which is new, unfamiliar, uncertain, confusing, or potentially risky. But the timing of a change effort can influence how readily people accept the change and adjust to it.

Naomi Karten's picture Naomi Karten
Rocks into Gold: Part 1

This short book, written by Clarke Ching, is a "biztech" parable for software developers who want to survive—and then thrive—through the credit crunch. We have republished the book in a four-part series. In part one, we meet the main characters who have just found out that their jobs are on the line after discovering their major client's business is failing. Follow the story as our characters fight to keep their jobs by implementing creative business ideas and management skills taken from agile development.

Clarke Ching's picture Clarke Ching
ScrumBut: Failure to Deliver

In this article, Michele Sliger discusses one of the more common "ScrumBut" practices that, while allowing teams to say "We suck less," isn't really in keeping with intended Scrum practices. This ScrumBut practice is the persistent failure of the team to complete the agreed-upon features in the iteration or sprint.

Michele Sliger's picture Michele Sliger
Distributed Agile Day to Day

"Distributed" isn't a word that always has appeared favorably in works about agile methodology. After all, the proximity of agile team members while working is highly regarded. In this article, an excerpt of which originally appeared in the May 2009 Iterations eNewsletter, Chris McMahon takes a look at how "agile" and "distributed" can work together successfully.

Chris McMahon's picture Chris McMahon
Three Strategies for Task Allocation

Iteration and release planning are keys to successful agile projects, but overall have a relatively small impact on a developer's day-to-day life, compared to the daily planning that takes place each morning. The strategy a team uses to sign up for work has significant implications for what a developer's day will look like, impacts his work style and habits, and ultimately can significantly impact the overall success of the iteration. Unfortunately, the agile community gives relatively little guidance in this area. In this article, I will share my experiences with three strategies for task allocation, drawn from several typical agile projects with two to three week iterations.

Robert  Williams's picture Robert Williams
Requirements Come Second: A Second Look

My article, Requirements Come Second, in a recent issue of Agile Journal caused something of a fuss. The piece was picked up by several more sites and was widely commented on - both on websites an in my inbox. I'm not entirely surprised by this reaction, I've been discussing this research for a year or so now and often find it surprises people. Given this level of interest it is worth looking at how people responded. It is also worth restating the key message: Requirements are an essential part of maximising business value, but when an organization is struggling with effectiveness it is best to start change by improving delivery.

Allan Kelly's picture Allan Kelly

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