process improvement

Articles

Four Agile Tips to Eliminate Rework in Application Development

Your applications need to meet business needs, overcome complex processes, and provide instant results to customers. And, ideally, they’ll require minimal rework on your part. The first step to success is requirements definition. Here, Filip Szymanski offers some tips from agile methods that will improve your requirements—even if you haven’t otherwise adopted agile.

Filip Szymanski's picture Filip Szymanski
Experimenting: The Way Forward for Agile Development Teams

If you asked anyone in my team what agile practice is most responsible for our success over the past eight years, I bet they'd answer "retrospectives". At the start of every two-week sprint, we spend time talking about the previous sprint, identifying areas that need improvement, and thiinking of ways to overcome obstacles. But I wonder if it's not so much the retrospectives themselves, as the small experiments (to borrow Linda Rising's term) we try to address our problem areas.

Lisa Crispin's picture Lisa Crispin
Mission Possible: ScrumMaster and Technical Contributor

Teams trying out Scrum might not be able to justify a full-time ScrumMaster to the organization, so the role is filled by a contributor on the team. This can be a challenge and, if done incorrectly, a problem. Learn some potential issues to be aware of and how to make the hybrid role work.

Steve Berczuk's picture Steve Berczuk
The Competition of Agile

It is sensible to want to avoid the head-butting sort of competition—that is, arguing for the sake of arguing. But, differing opinions and styles can be a good thing. Competitive forces have driven markets, innovation, and civilization for millennia. Here, Jurgen Appelo takes a look at some of the various approaches to agile development and what they bring to the table.

Jurgen Appelo's picture Jurgen Appelo
Mixing Roles in Scrum

We put a lot of emphasis on being Renaissance workers, able to step comfortably from one job role to the next. But, as Mitch Lacey describes here, not all roles play nicely with each other, and trying to combine them may lead to disaster.

Mitch Lacey's picture Mitch Lacey
Getting Empirical about Refactoring

Often when we refactor, we look at local areas of code. If we take a wider view, using information from our version control systems, we can get a better sense of the effects of our refactoring efforts.

Michael Feathers's picture Michael Feathers
Performance Factory for Agile and Lean Organizations

Implementing agile and lean performance appraisals presents some unique challenges. This article discusses how to do so in a way that helps to enhance the agile and lean practices that so clearly result in excellent team and organizational performance. The good news is that agile and lean performance management is much more effective than other methods.

Leslie  Sachs's picture Leslie Sachs
Thoughts from Mid-Project

My team is in the middle of one of the hardest projects—we call them "themes"—we’ve ever tackled. We’re a high-functioning agile team that has helped our company grow and succeed over several years now—we “went agile” in 2003. Here’s one thing I know for sure: No matter how many problems you solve, new challenges will pop up.

Lisa Crispin's picture Lisa Crispin
Acceptance Test-Driven Development: Not as Optional as You Think

The components of software processes work together in important and sometimes unrecognized ways. The removal of one of those components will affect the others. In this article, which originally appeared in the August 2010 issue of the Iterations eNewsletter, Jennitta Andrea takes a look at the value of acceptance test-driven development and the costs of making it an optional practice.

Jennitta Andrea's picture Jennitta Andrea
We're All in the Same Boat

Lisa Crispin dives into the "we're all in the same boat" theory and explains how it can't be more true in the software development world. From the need for common goals to going beyond taking responsibility for the team's actions, each team must know that you're going to fail or succeed together.

Lisa Crispin's picture Lisa Crispin

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