scrum

Conference Presentations

Agile Success with Scrum: It’s All about the People
Slideshow

Is it possible to be doing everything Scrum says to do and still fail horribly? Unfortunately, the answer is yes—and teams do it every day. To many, Scrum means concentrating on the meetings and artifacts, and making sure the roles all do their jobs. Bob Hartman and Michael Vizdos explore...

Bob Hartman, Agile For All
Managing Multiple Teams at Scale with Scrum and Lean
Slideshow

Scrum has become very popular in agile development shops, but most organizations that adopt Scrum run into challenges when they expand beyond a few teams. Ken Paugh believes that you can overcome the challenging patterns of scaling Scrum by focusing on lean-flow.

Ken Pugh, Net Objectives
Lean Startup Tools for Scrum Product Owners
Slideshow

In just a few years, the Lean Startup movement has gained influence by promoting a powerful but simple agile product management toolset—one that complements agile software development approaches such as Scrum and kanban. Arlen Bankston explores the tools and techniques product...

Arlen Bankston, LitheSpeed
Keynote: Magnificence: Culture Hacking, the Common Platform, and the Coming Golden Era
Video

A culture is the set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices that both describes and shapes a group. The unique challenges of creating software have demanded totally new types...

Jim McCarthy, McCarthy Technologies Inc.
Enterprise Lean-Agile: It’s More Than Scrum
Slideshow

Introducing agile development into a large enterprise is like creating a bubble of sanity in the midst of bedlam. Unless the sanity spreads, the effort is ultimately frustrating, frustrated—and fails. Jeff Marr describes the web of the enterprise ecosystem and presents strategies to build...

Jeff Marr, Cisco
Scrum for Global-Scale Development
Slideshow

A global development organization—in seven cities on three continents—has developers all using agile practices to develop complex applications. In addition to the common problems faced by distributed teams, they must deal with attrition rates in excess of 50 percent, possible loss of...

James Lynn, SUTO Consulting
The Enterprise Product Owner: It Takes a Village
Slideshow

In classic Scrum textbooks, the Product Owner (PO) permanently hangs out in the agile team room, churning out a stream of user stories, regularly prioritizing the backlog, deciding color schemes for screen design-all while keeping the team focused and making coffee. In an enterprise agile project, it is physically impossible for one person to do everything the PO role requires. Elena Yatzeck believes the enterprise PO must be a team role, where the different people move in and out of their PO responsibilities in a disciplined and predictable way. To illustrate, Elena leads a simulation that takes you through a full enterprise agile project, providing shared PO resources to help you with each aspect of the project. She offers PO advice on organizational change models, team design techniques, extended story templates, and tips for backlog grooming.

Elena Yatzeck, JPMorgan Chase
Agile at Scale with Scrum: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
Slideshow

Come hear the story of how a business unit at one of the world's largest networking companies transitioned to Scrum in eighteen months. The good-more than forty teams in one part of the company moved quickly and are going gangbusters. The bad-an adjacent part failed in its transition. The ugly-if you're in a large company with globally distributed teams, it's not hard to torpedo Scrum adoption. Steve Spearman and Heather Gray describe Scrum adoption challenges for a multi-million line, monolithic system developed across multiple locations worldwide. They share the techniques and tools that helped them implement Scrum in just two project cycles and the reasons part of the company failed to make the leap.

Steven Spearman, AgileEvolution
Distributed Scrum: Dangerous Waters-Be Prepared!
Slideshow

Even though team collocation is strongly recommended in agile methodologies, a distributed team is often required in the real world today. What is so important about collocating anyway? Can you overcome the challenges of a distributed Scrum team and still remain agile? What are the solutions? Brian Saylor tackles these important questions and more. While Brian realizes that implementing Scrum and agile practices in a distributed team is not easy, he found that it is possible if you understand the inherent problems and work hard-every day-to overcome them. Brian walks you through the reasons collocating is important for agile teams and the extra challenges distributed agile teams face. Then he dives into practical, real-world tools, tips, and techniques that organizations should research and consider before jumping into distributed waters-and don’t forget your life jacket.

Brian Saylor, Scripps Networks Interactive
Scaling Agile at Dell: Real-life Problems - and Solutions
Slideshow

The transition from waterfall-based software development to an agile, iterative model carries with it well-known challenges and problems-entrenched cultures, skill gaps, and organizational change management. For a large, globally distributed software development organization, an entirely different set of practical challenges comes with scaling agile practices. Last year the Dell Enterprise Solutions Group applied agile practices to more than forty projects ranging from a collocated single team project to projects that consisted of fifteen Scrum teams located across the US and India. Geoff Meyer and Brian Plunkett explain how Dell mined these real-life projects for their empirical value and adapted their agile practices into a flexible planning model that addresses the project complexities of staffing, scale, interdependency, and waterfall intersection.

Geoffrey Meyer, Dell Inc. l Enterprise Product Group

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