teams

Articles

How to Rule a Self-Organizing Team

Matthias Bohlen shares with us the importance of self organization. As a manager, you must set time or organizational boundaries that serve a purpose and let team members do what they think is appropriate and necessary within those boundaries.

Matthias Bohlen's picture Matthias Bohlen
Management Myth 13: I Must Never Admit My Mistakes

Managers are people, too. They have bad-manager days. And, even on good-manager days, they can show doubt, weakness, and uncertainty. They can be vulnerable. Managers are not omnipotent. That’s why it’s critical for a manager to admit a mistake immediately.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Management Myth #12: I Must Promote the Best Technical Person to Be a Manager

Managing requires a different skill set from technical work, yet many companies promote their best technical workers to management positions. Here are some things to consider when it's time to promote your technical workers.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Management Myth #11: The Team Needs a Cheerleader!

If you have a cheerleading manager (or, worse, if you are a cheerleading manager) in a troubled organization, then your team is likely missing its purpose. Replace those cheers with transparency, and you might be surprised by the solutions your team will come up with.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Management Myth #10: I Can Measure the Work by the Time People Spend at Work

Increasing the amount of time someone spends on work does not directly result in better work. In fact, depending on the person, the opposite may be the case—spending less time at the office may improve the results. Johanna tackles myths of measuring work by time.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Building a Team Through Feedback

The ability to give honest, effective feedback to someone is important. Equally important is the ability to hear and understand that feedback. Learn how to use good feedback to build a stronger team.

Globally Distributed Agile Development

Today, application development frequently consists of multiple teams, located across the globe, collaborating on a software project. Alex Perec describes how to make teams more productive and efficient without hindering their natural workflow.

Alex Perec's picture Alex Perec
Management Myth #9: We Have No Time for Training

It’s never easy to schedule training, but you must if you want the people you manage to learn a new language, tool, or skill. Johanna offers some tips for making time and capitalizing on curiosity.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Management Myth #8: I Can Still Do Significant Technical Work

The temptation can be incredibly strong for managers—especially new ones—to step in when a technical problem arises. But, that isn’t a very good show of faith in one’s team members. Johanna Rothman writes that as a manager, you have to delegate a problem and leave it delegated.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
The Independent Tester

Has the agile world’s insistence on collaboration blown away the need for testers to be independent? What do we mean by “independence,” anyway? Consultant Fiona Charles argues that tester independence is essential, but that it is a state of mind that can thrive only when the whole organizational culture supports it.

Fiona Charles's picture Fiona Charles

Pages

AgileConnection is a TechWell community.

Through conferences, training, consulting, and online resources, TechWell helps you develop and deliver great software every day.