Book Review: The Agile Mind-Set: Making Agile Processes Work

Gil Broza's book The Agile Mind-Set: Making Agile Processes Work speaks to the challenges faced by people who focus on "doing agile" rather than "being agile." Rote execution of methods can only get you so far, and Broza gives insights into how you move beyond practicing agile by habit into living it.

Steve Berczuk's picture Steve Berczuk
Welcome to Agile: A Developer’s Experience

In this article, a developer shares his personal experience with the transition from a waterfall environment to an agile one. He compares what it was like for him coding, learning, and communicating using each methodology, and he shares what it was like making the change to agile—and why he's never looking back.

Kris Hatcher's picture Kris Hatcher
How to Plan and Execute Programs without Shooting Agile in the Foot

Program planners in IT organizations have a dilemma: On one hand, their agile teams tell them that if requirements are defined up front, agile teams cannot operate; but on the other hand, the program’s budget and scope need to be defined so that resources can be allocated and contracts can be written for the work. How does one reconcile these conflicting demands?

Clifford Berg's picture Clifford Berg
Making the Agile Extra Lean by Adopting New Practices

Prakash Pujar writes about his team's experience adopting some of the best agile practices to make their process extra lean and increase efficiency by increasing throughput—all without any change to the agile framework his team was following before and after. Here, he talks about some of the lean practices that worked for them.

Prakash Pujar's picture Prakash Pujar

Better Software Magazine Articles

Improving Quality and Value Delivery with T-Shaped Team Members

Thomas Wessel presents how T-shaped and pi-shaped teams based on each member's span of knowledge, ability to collaborate, and depth of expertise play an important part in how effectively your team performs.

Thomas Wessel's picture Thomas Wessel
The Rules for Writing Maintainable Code

We've all been burned working with software code that, if not designed for long-term maintainability, results in expensive support over a product's lifetime. Kaushal explores three approaches that provide guidelines to ensure that software is designed with maintainability in mind. If you're a software developer, read this!

Kaushal Amin's picture Kaushal Amin
Google Web Toolkit: Your Shortcut to Ajax Web Applications

The Google Web Toolkit (GWT) is a tool designed to aid Ajax developers. GWT compiles Java source code into browser-friendly JavaScript and has many features that let you focus on writing your application instead of worrying about browser compatibility problems.

Daniel Wellman's picture Daniel Wellman
Hidden Risks in Web Code

A look at the HTML source code behind Web sites can often reveal security issues that would never be uncovered by those blissfully ignorant of the code. This bug report will examine two common methods of maintaining state and passing data in Web-based systems–hidden form fields and the HTTP GET method–and demonstrate some of the associated security risks through an examination of HTML code.

Rich Brauchle's picture Rich Brauchle


The GROWS Method: A Modern Software Development Suite: An Interview with Andy Hunt

In this interview, Andy Hunt, a consultant, author, and publisher, explains why agile development is in a rut. He also covers why agile is so often abandoned, the issues with doing agile "by the books," and his GROWS Method.

Josiah Renaudin's picture Josiah Renaudin
The "Show Me the Money" Approach to Software Development: An Interview with Michael Harris

In this interview, Michael Harris, the president and CEO of David Consulting Group, explains his five-step Value Visualization Framework. He discusses how he came up with the idea, how it can help your team right now, and its similarities to the agile methodology.

Josiah Renaudin's picture Josiah Renaudin
Better Thinking for Better Software: Thinking Critically about Software Development: An Interview with Laurent Bossavit

In this interview, software developer Laurent Bossavit talks about why we need to think more critically about software development. He dispels common misconceptions about the industry and suggests better ways to improve the development process, such as agile and lean methods.

Josiah Renaudin's picture Josiah Renaudin
The Future of Agile: Dilution, Calcification, or Evolution: An Interview with Jeff Morgan

In this interview, LeanDog cofounder Jeff Morgan talks about both the current state of agile and how we can shape its future. He digs into the different ways that people are watering it down, as well as the possibility for some other methodology to break out in the near future.

Josiah Renaudin's picture Josiah Renaudin

Conference Presentations

Continuous Testing through Service Virtualization (STAREAST 2014)

The demand to accelerate software delivery and for teams to continuously test and release high quality software sooner has never been greater. However, whether your release strategy is...

Allan Wagner, IBM
Scaling Agile at Dell: Real-life Problems - and Solutions

The transition from waterfall-based software development to an agile, iterative model carries with it well-known challenges and problems-entrenched cultures, skill gaps, and organizational change management. For a large, globally distributed software development organization, an entirely different set of practical challenges comes with scaling agile practices. Last year the Dell Enterprise Solutions Group applied agile practices to more than forty projects ranging from a collocated single team project to projects that consisted of fifteen Scrum teams located across the US and India. Geoff Meyer and Brian Plunkett explain how Dell mined these real-life projects for their empirical value and adapted their agile practices into a flexible planning model that addresses the project complexities of staffing, scale, interdependency, and waterfall intersection.

Geoffrey Meyer, Dell Inc. l Enterprise Product Group
Protection Poker: An Agile Security Game

Each time a new feature is added to a product, developers need to consider the security risk implications, find ways to securely implement the function, and develop tests to confirm that the risk is gone or significantly lowered. Laurie Williams shares a Wideband Delphi practice called Protection Poker she's employed as a collaborative, interactive, and informal agile structure for "misuse case" development and threat modeling. Laurie shares the case study results of a software development team at RedHat that used Protection Poker to identify security risks, find ways to mitigate those risks, and increase security knowledge throughout the team. In this session, Laurie leads an interactive Protection Poker exercise in which you and other participants analyze the security risk of sample new features and learn to collaboratively think like an attacker.

Laurie Williams, North Carolina State University

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