use cases

Articles

The Three Amigos Strategy of Developing User Stories

Developing software correctly is a detail-oriented business. George Dinwiddie writes on how using the Three Amigos strategy can help you develop great user stories. Remember, the goal is to have the work done just in time for planning and development. It should be complete enough to avoid stoppages to build more understanding, but not so far in advance that the details get stale.

George Dinwiddie's picture George Dinwiddie
Designing Scenarios for Agile Stories

The needs to improve the time to market of a quality product and adapt to a changing business environment are driving organizations to adopt agile practices in order to be competitive in the marketplace. However, a project team is bound to face difficulties if it is not trained on the fundamentals of agile. Read on to learn how to design scenarios for agile stories using a structured framework.

Sharath Bhat's picture Sharath Bhat
True Performance: Moving Beyond Basic Load Testing

Basic load testing is valuable, but it's important to move past simplistic efforts. Here are some ways to gain more accurate metrics from your load tests.

Jim Holmes's picture Jim Holmes
Helping the Customer Stick to the Purpose of a User Story

Lisa Crispin writes that you need to understand the purpose of a user story or feature. Start with the "why." You can worry later about the "how." The customers get to decide on the business value to be delivered. They generally aren't qualified to dictate the technical implementation of that functionality. It's up to the technical team to decide the best way to deliver the desired feature through the software.

Lisa Crispin's picture Lisa Crispin

Better Software Magazine Articles

How Do You Write Good User Stories?

Expert answers to frequently asked questions. In this issue, David Hussman explains how to write good user stories.

David Hussman's picture David Hussman
Building a Foundation for Structured Requirements

Aspect-oriented requirements engineering (AORE) is a new methodology that can help us to further improve the analysis, structure, and cost of development of software requirements. The second part of this two-part series focuses on the AORE specification techniques.

Yuri Chernak's picture Yuri Chernak
Building a Foundation for Structured Requirements, Part 1

Aspect-oriented requirements engineering (AORE) is a new methodology that can help us improve the analysis, structure, and cost of development of software requirements. AORE does not replace but rather complements any of the existing requirements methodologies. This two-part paper explains to software practitioners the AORE concept, illustrates how it can be applied on software projects, and discusses the benefits of AORE. Part I focuses on the AORE analysis techniques.

Yuri Chernak's picture Yuri Chernak
Form Fitting: Patterns to Judge the Effectiveness of Use Cases

You don't have to be Giorgio Armani to fashion effective use cases. Use case patterns can provide you with a vocabulary to help you describe and judge the quality of your use cases. Find out how you can use these patterns to improve your requirements modelin

Steve Adolph's picture Steve Adolph

Conference Presentations

The Why and How of Usability and User Experience (UX) Testing
Slideshow

Although usability and user experience may seem synonymous, they are separate and much different concepts. While usability is well defined in standards, UX has no agreed upon definition because it relates to a more nebulous attribute-user satisfaction. Both are, however, key ingredients for successful system deployment. Because they don’t know how to measure and evaluate UX, many teams ignore this important attribute until the end of development. Philip Lew discusses how to model both usability and UX by breaking each attribute down into measurable characteristics-learnability, user effectiveness, user efficiency, content quality, user errors, and more. Phil shows you how to derive measurements and metrics that your development and team can employ to benchmark, analyze, and improve both usability and UX.

Philip Lew, XBOSoft
Writing Testable Use Cases

Use cases are hard to test because they do not have a standard format or style, and lack coherent structure. This is due in part to the need for a standard definition in UML, which defines the graphical part but not the textual part. In this session, Jim Heumann pinpoints the issues related to testability of use cases and introduces a testable style for writing use cases, a process used extensively and successfully by IBM Rational Software. Based on the testable use case writing technique, you will learn how to create test cases from these use cases.

  • How to make a use case more understandable and testable
  • Examples of testable use cases
  • How to create test cases from use cases
Jim Heumann, IBM Rational Software

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