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Refactoring Doesn’t Mean Rewrite[article]

Peter Schuh writes that it is not a good thing that the use of the term refactoring has grown so common, which makes him cringe every time he hears a business person say the word. Refactoring is meant to be one skill of many that is second-nature to a journeyman programmer.

Peter Schuh's picture Peter Schuh
Enterprise Agile: Yes, Your Whole Company Can Adopt Agile[article]

About 12 months ago, our company started an initiative to adopt agile practices across our entire organization—not only our software development organization, but our business organization. For years we had experienced outstanding results by utilizing Scrum for our clients' application development projects. Team productivity improved, executive visibility strengthened, and overall quality increased. Our goal was to capture similar results for our business. Find out how we're doing!

Melissa Meeker's picture Melissa Meeker
Six Ways to Build Trust and Three Ways to Break It[article]

Esther Derby has been thinking about trust in the workplace a lot lately, and the absence of trust, too. When she asks people what it's like to work in a group where people trust their managers, they tell her information flows freely, conflict is productive, and that they can tell their managers what they think without fear of retribution. On the other hand, when trust is absent, people hide information, look out for themselves, don't bring up new ideas, and withhold effort.

Esther Derby's picture Esther Derby
Reloadable Test Data-O-Matic[magazine]

Reloadable test data takes more time up front (as compared to on-the-fly data creation), but saves blood, sweat, and tears in the long term. It also virtually eliminates "works on my machine" bugs, creates a more intricate and realistic environment, and is the first step on the road to test automation.

Tanya Dumaresq's picture Tanya Dumaresq
Off the Trails[magazine]

A focused approach toward testing a product is important, but sometimes we discover information that we didn't anticipate at all. One of the key skills in testing is dynamically managing our focus; sharpening it sometimes and widening it at other times. If we vary our approaches, we might find something surprising and broaden our coverage.

Michael Bolton's picture Michael Bolton
The Missing Measurement[magazine]

In these times, many of us are being told to "do more with less." A more useful approach is "invest our organization's scarce resources where the return is the greatest." To do so, we must define the financial benefits sought when developing a system in addition to its requirements.

Lee Copeland's picture Lee Copeland
Building a Foundation for Structured Requirements[magazine]

Aspect-oriented requirements engineering (AORE) is a new methodology that can help us to further improve the analysis, structure, and cost of development of software requirements. The second part of this two-part series focuses on the AORE specification techniques.

Yuri Chernak's picture Yuri Chernak
Lean Portfolio Management: Guiding IT Projects with Business Value[magazine]

Improving your software development process is only valuable if it fills the highest priority needs for your business clients with speed and quality. Lean principles provide guidance on how to create a structure that lets business priorities drive the selection of the right products for creation and enhancement.

Guy Beaver's picture Guy Beaver
Taming the Headless Beast: A Proven Strategy for Testing Web Services[magazine]

The benefits of Web services are becoming widely demonstrated and accepted. However, these benefits are not without their own challenges. How can you enter data and verify the response of a system without a GUI? Are you ready to tame this headless beast?

David Fern's picture David Fern
What's Going Right Around Here?[article]

Instead of focusing on the problems, focus on what works. That is the simple premise of "appreciative inquiry." In this week's column, Ellen Gottesdiener explains how to help your team focus on the processes that work by outlining what should be included in your appreciative inquiries, in order to make more positive organizational changes.

Ellen ellensqe's picture Ellen ellensqe
Go, Team![magazine]

Fed up with good-ol'-boy salesmen, a manufacturing mindset, and just-get-it-out-the-door directions? A little assertiveness, a few ounces of patience, a dash of charm, a lot of leadership, and some attitude adjustment by everyone might help. Read how one manager made the world a better place to work one small victory at a time.

Patrick Bailey's picture Patrick Bailey
The Ghost of a Codebase Past[magazine]

Revisiting your old code can be an enlightening experience. Pete Goodliffe encourages us to look back at our old code to see how our technique has improved, how our programming skills have progressed, and what we can learn from it.

Pete Goodliffe's picture Pete Goodliffe
Not Wanted on the Voyage[article]

Back in the day of cross-Atlantic boat travel, luggage that wasn't needed during the long journey was labeled "Not Wanted on the Voyage" and stowed away below decks. In this column, Fiona Charles suggests that testers can also be viewed as heavy baggage and not exactly welcome by some parties during the journey of software development. To understand why others might think this way, Fiona takes a good, hard look at what testers do that could possibly make them undesirable team mates.

Fiona Charles's picture Fiona Charles
An Agile Approach to Scheduling[article]

When we schedule too many variables, things start to slip and soon the schedule is out the window. Paying attention to your project's constraints can help you set realistic scheduling goals that you will actually be able to stick to.

Carlos Sirias's picture Carlos Sirias
Requirements Come Second[article]

Despite our best efforts we need to know what we are going to code before we write the code. And as much as we might like to test before we write the code we can't really run tests until we have some code. Agile overlaps requirements discovery and implementation so coding can start with minimal or outline requirements but there is still a sequence.

Allan Kelly's picture Allan Kelly

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