The Latest

Keys to Top-Notch Estimates[magazine]

If the construction industry estimated projects as poorly as the IT industry does, we would still be living in mud huts. Yet inaccurate project estimates have become the norm in the software industry. Find out how you can turn your estimates into reasonable predictions of project performance.

Is ''Agile'' Distracting You?[magazine]

If a process tool or service claims to be agile it must be good, right? Not necessarily. The term "agile" has become abused and, since we don't have a standard dictionary definition, it is open to interpretation. So, let's look beyond the label to what really matters—value.

Jonathan Kohl's picture Jonathan Kohl
A Culture of Trust[magazine]

So, you've been asked to take over the leadership of a struggling, disconnected team. Now what? Create a culture where the building of trust between team members is fostered, flourishes, and thrives--where people who have not begun to trust each other can discover the possibility.

Pollyanna Pixton's picture Pollyanna Pixton
From Here to Acceptance Test-Driven Development[magazine]

Acceptance test-driven development (ATDD) means different things to different people based on their experiences—from "It's all about testing" to "It has nothing to do with testing,” and from "TDD, ATDD—it's all the same" to "TDD and ATDD are nothing alike." These nine landmarks will help you navigate ATDD no matter where you are coming from.

Antony Marcano's picture Antony Marcano
So, You've Got a Problem: Crafting Remarks and Abstracts for Defect Reports[magazine]

Software defect reports are among the most important deliverables to come out of software testing. They are as important as the test plan and will have more impact on the quality of the product than most other deliverables from the software test team. It's worth the effort to learn how to write an effective defect report that conveys the proper message and simplifies the process for everyone.

Kelly Whitmill's picture Kelly Whitmill
Idioms and Idiosyncrasies[magazine]

As programmers, we are not merely engineering drones; we are also artisans. The act of programming involves as much artistry as it does technicality. When we craft great software, we naturally use language idioms help to show the elegance, beauty, and artistry of a piece of code. But sometimes the desire for beautiful idiomatic code can trip us up.

Pete Goodliffe's picture Pete Goodliffe
It's in the Way That You Use It[magazine]

Rapid testers don't think of test automation merely as something that controls a program and checks for some expected result. Instead, we think of test automation as any use of tools to support testing. With that definition in mind, it may not be the most obvious automation tool that is the most useful.

Michael Bolton's picture Michael Bolton
Exit, Stage Left[magazine]

Many technology workers are drawn to the industry from seemingly unrelated professions. Don't underestimate the importance of a liberal arts education and general life experiences to the technology field. These workers can bring a lot of value and wisdom to your team.

Patrick Bailey's picture Patrick Bailey
Agile Testing as if People Mattered[article]

As a test professional in waterfall, I was used to getting the code much later and buggier than I expected and being under tremendous pressure to finish my testing before the go-live date hit. Then one day, I found out that there was a better way. Testers could be involved much earlier in the lifecycle, they could participate in requirements and design decisions as they happened, and the code could actually be unit tested before I received it! Heaven? Nope, agile.

Daryl  Kulak's picture Daryl Kulak
Agile in Motion: The Process Purpose Model[article]

In this interview for the Iterations newsletter, Heather Shanholtzer talks with Niel Nickolaisen about the Process Purpose Model, a tool to help identify which features you really need and which you can skip.

Heather Shanholtzer's picture Heather Shanholtzer
Receptiveness to Change[article]

Everyone responds to change differently, whether managers know this or not. A good leader knows this, and doesn't hurt the morale of a team by expecting them to act a way that their incapable of, or that feels unnatural to them. Naomi Karten brings this all to light in this article.

Naomi Karten's picture Naomi Karten
Do the Pre-Flight Check so Your Code Doesn't Crash and Burn After Takeoff[article]

Agile development and continuous integration challenges.  To travel by air, you get to the airport, check in, with any luck get on a plane, and get to your destination. Perhaps you do not arrive precisely on time, but close enough that you make that important meeting or family event. Like jumbo jet pilots, software development teams and project managers have a lot more to worry about than the final consumers of the software or the passengers on the plane. Pilots have to go through a rigorous pre-flight check routine to ensure the plane is in top condition, the correct amount of fuel is on board, hydraulics and electrical systems are all working properly, the flight plan and latest weather is reviewed - and it's all done on the same jet that is being flown. The pilot wouldn't do their pre-flight check on their private Cessna then jump on board the corporate Gulfstream, or a Boeing 767, would they?

Anders  Wallgren's picture Anders Wallgren
Test Managers-Start Managing![article]

Some things in life, like death and taxes, are a given. Software development teams face their own givens: Project schedules will always change and certain teams will suffer because of these changes. If that's to be expected, then why haven't most managers done anything to save their teams from undue stress and abuse? In this column, Dion Johnson explains that we've got to take care of our teams, or else we'll never see the end of team abuse.

Dion Johnson's picture Dion Johnson
Weathering the Storm[article]

The economy, like the weather, is a complex system that cycles through good times and bad. Dark economic clouds are brewing on the horizon. Predictions of inflation, stagnant growth, crushing debt, tightening credit are in the forecast. Payson Hall tells us how to weather the storm.

Payson Hall's picture Payson Hall
Applying Configuration Management to Agile Teams[article]

A variety of agile software development methods and practices have now been around for a solid ten years and existed for at least another ten years prior. Configuration management (CM) for agile development has now been discussed since the turn of the century. So what are the core principles of CM and how can CM help agile teams?

Mario  Moreira's picture Mario Moreira


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