The Latest

Do the Pre-Flight Check so Your Code Doesn't Crash and Burn After Takeoff[article]

Agile development and continuous integration challenges.  To travel by air, you get to the airport, check in, with any luck get on a plane, and get to your destination. Perhaps you do not arrive precisely on time, but close enough that you make that important meeting or family event. Like jumbo jet pilots, software development teams and project managers have a lot more to worry about than the final consumers of the software or the passengers on the plane. Pilots have to go through a rigorous pre-flight check routine to ensure the plane is in top condition, the correct amount of fuel is on board, hydraulics and electrical systems are all working properly, the flight plan and latest weather is reviewed - and it's all done on the same jet that is being flown. The pilot wouldn't do their pre-flight check on their private Cessna then jump on board the corporate Gulfstream, or a Boeing 767, would they?

Anders  Wallgren's picture Anders Wallgren
Test Managers-Start Managing![article]

Some things in life, like death and taxes, are a given. Software development teams face their own givens: Project schedules will always change and certain teams will suffer because of these changes. If that's to be expected, then why haven't most managers done anything to save their teams from undue stress and abuse? In this column, Dion Johnson explains that we've got to take care of our teams, or else we'll never see the end of team abuse.

Dion Johnson's picture Dion Johnson
Preparing for Resource-Constrained Times[article]

The economy, like the weather, is a complex system that cycles through good times and bad. Dark economic clouds are brewing on the horizon. Predictions of inflation, stagnant growth, crushing debt, tightening credit are in the forecast. Payson Hall tells us how to weather the storm.

Payson Hall's picture Payson Hall
Applying Configuration Management to Agile Teams[article]

A variety of agile software development methods and practices have now been around for a solid ten years and existed for at least another ten years prior. Configuration management (CM) for agile development has now been discussed since the turn of the century. So what are the core principles of CM and how can CM help agile teams?

Mario  Moreira's picture Mario Moreira
Real-World Math[article]

Math is often not easy to learn, even for those of us who enjoy it. And if you don't use your mathematical knowledge, you just might forget how to use it. Danny Faught likes math and has found ways of using basic math like algebra, the modulo function, expected values, and logarithms in testing. It's kept his mind fresh on mathematical concepts and formulas, and he hopes it will do the same for you. In this week's column, he explains how to use math to improve testing.

Danny R. Faught's picture Danny R. Faught
Does Exploratory Testing Have a Place on Agile Teams?[article]

Exploratory testing—questioning and learning about the product as you design and execute tests rather than slavishly following predefined scripts—makes sense for many projects. But does it make sense for agile projects? In this column, Johanna Rothman examines how exploratory testing might work on an agile project.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Programming with GUTs[magazine]

Because tests are commonly viewed in terms of offering quantitative feedback on the presence or absence of defects in specific situations, Good Unit Tests need to both illustrate and define the behavioral contract of the unit in question. Do you have GUTs?

Kevlin Henney's picture Kevlin Henney
Two Cheers for Ambiguity[magazine]

Some people dismiss words such as skill, diversity, problems, and mission as being too ambiguous to be useful. But one tester's ambiguity is another tester's gauge for assessing consensus on a project and how to achieve that consensus.

Michael Bolton's picture Michael Bolton
Going on a Picnic with James Watt[magazine]

What if you had a picnic and no one brought potato salad? Find out what picnic planning and steam engines have to do with project success and not just satisfying your customers but delighting them.

Clarke Ching's picture Clarke Ching
Encourage Pair Programming[magazine]

Pair programming is one of the most controversial agile practices. Managers are concerned about the costs and developers are concerned about personal agony. But there also are many benefits. If you are thinking about trying pair programming, here are several reasons why you should.

Rob Myers's picture Rob Myers
Software: Use at Your Own Risk[magazine]

Is it really so hard to produce software that works? When was the last time you read a software license agreement? Most are one-sided statements that limit the product developer's liability. It's time to move away from "Use at your own risk" software and be upfront with customers about the true cost of quality.

Chuck Allison's picture Chuck Allison
Give Your Defects Some Static[magazine]

Computer security has raised the demand for automated tools that can analyze source code for vulnerabilities and defects. Find out how you can put automated static analyzers to work for you.

A Galaxy of Patterns[magazine]

The Gang of Four's design patterns have a special place in many programmers' hearts. But it's time to look beyond the GoF twenty-three and realize they aren't the only patterns in the universe.

Neil Harrison's picture Neil Harrison
How to Fail with Agile[magazine]

A switch to agile often conflicts with personal career goals such as maintaining the status quo and working no harder than necessary. These twenty guidelines will help you sabotage your agile project, helping you fail quickly and spectacularly.

May I Take Your Temperature?[article]

This column isn't for you; it's about you. Linda Hayes wants to find out what it takes to be successful in the testing profession these days—if such a thing is really possible. Too many good ideas, such as incentive and recognition plans, have backfired. Linda feels there are a few good practices out there, but she needs your help to find them.

Linda Hayes's picture Linda Hayes

Pages

AgileConnection is a TechWell community.

Through conferences, training, consulting, and online resources, TechWell helps you develop and deliver great software every day.