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Make Reuse a Reality with STL Algorithms[magazine]

Good code is a beautiful thing--especially when you don't have to write it. While most of us are quick to use prepackaged containers such as vectors, lists, and maps in everyday programming, we often overlook algorithms as a reuse tool. Find out how standard template library algorithms, specifically, can put you on the road to reuse.

Chuck Allison's picture Chuck Allison
Agile Survey Results: Widespread Adoption, Emphasis on Productivity and Quality[article]

This summer in 2006, the Agile Project Leadership Network (APLN) co-sponsored the 2nd Annual 'State of Agile Development' Survey. Almost 1,700 respondents from 71 countries shared their companies' experiences using of Agile methods and the challenges that they face with future adoption. Teams have begun to quantify the value that their projects have achieved and are steadily expanding the types of Agile practices and tools that they use. IT metrics are well-understood. Business metrics must also play a role, but few were included in the scope of this survey.

TechWell Contributor's picture TechWell Contributor
Personal Agility for More Potent Agile Adoption[article]

In this article, the authors propose that the most effective teams—those that show a tremendous improvement in productivity and value to their organizations—have individual team members who take ownership, act responsibly, and are disciplined in recognizing and responding to change at a personal level.

TechWell Contributor's picture TechWell Contributor
How to Be Persuasive[article]

Successfully persuading others to adopt your point of view is a matter of neither magic nor luck. It's a skill and like any skill, improvement takes know—how, opportunity, and practice. In this column, Naomi Karten offers pointers to help you strengthen your persuasion skills.

Naomi Karten's picture Naomi Karten
Lean Anti-Patterns and What to Do About Them[article]

When attempting to adopt best practices we often can't see the forest for the trees. We can see what we are doing wrong, but how will that help us to see what to do right? In this article, we will discuss a few common Lean Anti-Patterns. Anti-Patterns are commonly recurring practices that are counter productive. We call them "Anti-Patterns" because these anti-patterns result from violating Lean principles. Lean principles form the basis for Scrum practices. Looking at how Lean Anti-Patterns violate lean principles gives us insight into how we need to modify our practices to be more effective.

Alan Shalloway's picture Alan Shalloway
People-Driven Software Development[article]

Traditionally, we think about projects is in termsof scope, time, cost, quality, human resources, communication, and risk. Thisway of thinking mainly originated in industries other than software development.It fits software development projects poorly, because these projects are mainlyabout people's abilities.

Piles of Sand, Redux: Why Compilers Miscalculate Floating Point Numbers[magazine]

In this continuation of his June 2007 article on floating-point numbers, Chuck Allison explains why certain compilers miscalculate sin(x) for large arguments and why some get it right. He also divulges that floating-point spacing is the key to getting the most from numeric computations.

Chuck Allison's picture Chuck Allison
Extreme Programming Is People[magazine]

Agile agents of change, listen up. Do you remember the Agile Manifesto? How about the part about valuing people over process? J.B. Rainsberger fears that as Extreme Programming becomes more widespread, teachers, consultants, and mentors are losing sight of one of agile’s most important components—teamwork.

J.B. Rainsberger's picture J.B. Rainsberger
Kicking Off the Slow Software Movement[magazine]

Do your team members jump into a project with both feet before they fully understand what problem they are trying to solve? We’ve all been convinced that for our customers faster is better. But is that really what they want? Jeff Patton thinks it’s time for us to slow down and focus on the quality of our products.

Jeff Patton's picture Jeff Patton
Games Stakeholders Play[magazine]

Activity theory explores what is happening inside a person while he is acting. Find out how you can use it to make better decisions about what to build, create a motivation map, and ask what your stakeholders are thinking about besides using your system.

Alistair Cockburn's picture Alistair Cockburn
Small Releases Big Returns[magazine]

Many teams work on several projects simultaneously, which is a mistake. By working on one project at a time and releasing early and often, you can achieve startling improvements in value for your stakeholders.

James Shore's picture James Shore
Your Mom Doesn't Work Here: Cleaning up with Java Memory Management[magazine]

For large-scale Java applications, understanding memory-related options might mean the difference between a wonderful user experience and recurring system slow downs. This article offers insight into the workings of Java memory management and shows how it cleans up after programmers, recovering memory associated with objects that are no longer being used.

Alan Berg's picture Alan Berg
Getting Your Hands Dirty[magazine]

One way to build quality in is to prevent defects from ever happening. Discover how you can avoid defects by figuring out how to test each feature or requirement before you begin to write the code. Clarke Ching offers up an easy, hands-on example you can put to use today.

Clarke Ching's picture Clarke Ching
Go with the Flow[magazine]

Simplicity in testing is a worthy goal, but in reality it's a messy, complex world. Find out how to defocus your test strategy and use flow testing to follow a specific path through a system's functions, investigating circumstances in which it might fail.

Michael Bolton's picture Michael Bolton
When Trust Goes AWOL[article]

Trust is invisible, but the symptoms of its absence are not. That is the theme of this column, in which Clarke Ching recounts the difficulty one of his clients went through to rebuild trust with a customer. The customer had long ago lost faith in the quality of the products provided by this client since every piece of software delivered seemed buggy. But both were determined to make the relationship work. That's when Clarke Ching stepped in and took an agile approach to relationship therapy.

Clarke Ching's picture Clarke Ching

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