The Latest

When Your Developers Don't Work for You-How I Managed A Band of "Hackers"[presentation]

The future of the development world lies with a bunch of skilled programmers living wherever they want, taking whichever projects they like, naming their price, and disappearing once the project is over.

Lee Fischman, Galorath, Inc.
Troubled Times[article]

Market analysts say the economy is recovering from the recession. But it seems that every day we read about another company laying off workers and the tough IT job market. All this has Eileen Strider wondering, in this week's column, how you are faring and what kind of support you are both giving and receiving during these tough times.

Eileen Strider's picture Eileen Strider
The Impact of Team/Personal Software Processes[presentation]

Several years ago, the Naval Oceanographic Office initiated its process improvement effort with Team Software Process (TSP) and Personal Software Process (PSP) as its foundation.

Edward Battle, Naval Oceanographic Office
A New Approach for Estimating in e-Business Development[presentation]

In order to control the costs and schedules of new eBusiness development projects, a revolution in estimation and the software lifecycle must take place.

David Duncan, Cambridge Technology Partners
Buffers and Risk: Critical Chain Project Management[presentation]

Critical Chain Project Management uses statistical process control to more clearly define the relationships between tasks and the project end date by using buffers to represent process variation in project tasks.

Robert Muller, Cytokinetics, Inc.
Software Configuration Management[magazine]

Pat Wegerson recommends software configuration management resources AntiPatterns and Patterns in Software Configuration Management and the online CM Yellow Pages.

Pat  Wegerson's picture Pat Wegerson
How to Make Risk Conversations More Effective[article]

Project managers may be reluctant, even unwilling, to discuss problems that testers discover in a project. In this column, management expert Johanna Rothman gives tips on how best to tell management that "the sky is falling," and how to respond if they don't want to hear about potential problems before they occur.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Tinkerable Software[article]

In what ways should software be like a house? In a recent issue of STQE magazine, Technical Editor Brian Marick's musings about the concept of "tinkerable software" generated some interesting discussion about the very nature of software design. This week's column runs a portion of that piece so that our Sticky-minded readers can sink their thoughts into the concept.

Brian Marick's picture Brian Marick
Institutionalizing Poor Quality[article]

Have you ever noticed how many professional activities don't utilize a separate testing phase? Veteran tester and instructor Lee Copeland has. And it got him thinking about our industry and the role a tester plays. In this week's column, you may be surprised by his conclusions.

Lee Copeland's picture Lee Copeland
Managers and the Helpitis Malady[article]

Most of us want to be helpful. It's satisfying knowing that we've been able to solve a problem for another person. But what about those times when the other person doesn't really want our help? In this column, Eileen Strider shows how to offer "healthy" assistance, without giving in to the sickly variety.

Eileen Strider's picture Eileen Strider
A Selection of "Our Take" Columns[article]

"Our Take" is a regular column from the editors at Software Quality Engineering. It appears in the twice-monthly StickyLetter since its inception in September 2000 (originally "STQe-Letter"). From jazz music, to car troubles, to the Lewis and Clark expedition, Robert Rose-Coutré, former StickyMinds.com Editor, will use anything to make a point about building better software. The editors at Software Quality Engineering have compiled a collection of some of these pieces. Musings from StickyLetter's "Our Take" are presented here.

Robert Rose-Coutré's picture Robert Rose-Coutré
Bug Counts vs. Test Coverage[article]

Occasionally, we encounter projects where bug counts simply aren't as high as we expect. Perhaps the product under test is in its second or third release cycle, or maybe the development team invested an inordinate amount of time in unit testing. Whatever the reason, low bug counts can be a cause of concern because they can indicate that pieces of functionality (which potentially contain bugs) are being missed. When low bug counts are encountered, management may begin to wonder about the quality of testing. This article covers techniques for dealing with low bug counts, and methods for reassuring management that coverage is being achieved.

Andrew Lance's picture Andrew Lance
Make Your Point—Without Pointing a Finger[article]

When errors are not detected during testing, somewhere down the line someone has to take responsibility. In this column, Linda Hayes shows you when and how to do so—and you might even be able to turn the situation to your advantage.

Linda Hayes's picture Linda Hayes
Measuring Up: How to Preview User Satisfaction before Your Release[article]

Why wait to discover how your users will react to your system when there are ways to measure such things during development? This column describes a simple tool to develop visibility into customer satisfaction. Learn how you can begin to manage expectations so that neither you nor the customer has an unpleasant surprise on release day.

Esther Derby's picture Esther Derby
Giving the Human Touch to Software[article]

Yogita works as a QA/testing professional with Mindfire Solutions, and has written a number of articles on QA and testing strategies. Yogita is currently exploring thoughts of beauty as an area of testing and its relation to usability. Her role at Mindfire has been to implement Quality processes throughout the organization and build a dedicated testing team. The team recently published a White Paper “Porting projects: Test techniques,” downloadable from www.mindfiresolutions.com. Yogita can be reached at yogitas@mindfiresolutions.com.

Yogita Sahoo's picture Yogita Sahoo

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