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Amplifying Collaboration with Guerilla Facilitation

Sometimes, an ineffective meeting can be more damaging than no meeting at all. But, if you're not the person in charge of facilitating the meeting, how can you help keep the group and the meeting in line? In this article, Ellen Gottesdiener offers some suggestions for both facilitators and non-facilitators that may help ease some of your meeting frustrations.

Ellen Gottesdiener's picture Ellen Gottesdiener
We're All In the Same Boat

Lisa Crispin dives into the "we're all in the same boat" theory and explains how it can't be more true in the software development world. From the need for common goals to going beyond taking responsibility for the team's actions - each team must know that you're going to fail or succeed together.

Lisa Crispin's picture Lisa Crispin
Agile Tips and Advice - Index Cards - Wave of the Past, Present and Future
Podcast

In a podcast that will surely get you thinking, we take a look at why the index card, yes, the simple index card could be the most valuable project management tool of all time. Take a listen and see if you agree that you simply cannot live without them on an agile project.

Bob Payne's picture Bob Payne
Transitioning to Agile Testing

Your developers are already working feature-by-feature in iterations, but your testers are stuck with manual tests. How do you make the leap to agile testing when the nature of agile's iterative releases challenges testers to test working segments of a product instead of the complete package? In this column, Johanna Rothman explains that the key challenge resides in bringing the whole team together to work towards the completion of an iteration. Only then will the testers—and the entire team—know how to transition to agile.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Tips and Advice - The three basic things - Simple but not easy
Podcast

Tips and Advice - The three basic things - Simple but not easy

Bob Payne's picture Bob Payne
What Is a Good Project Manager?

The definition of a "good project manager" varies depending on what skills you value most of this person. In this week's column, Payson Hall explores the root of the definition, highlighting the key characteristic he believes is the true hallmark of a good project manager.

Payson Hall's picture Payson Hall
The Marriage of Lean, Scrum and Extreme Programming (XP)

Many flavors of Agile have emerged: Scrum, Lean, Feature Driven Development (FDD), and Extreme Programming just to name a few. These methods have numerous complementary and distinguishing features, but the gamut of choices can be confusing and disorienting - as if being told to choose the best from 31 flavors of ice cream. Return on Investment (ROI) is important to me, so Lean must be the answer. But wait, I also want to be agile with my business priorities so I’ll choose Scrum. We are left wanting a simple question answered: “Which Agile method should I choose for my organization?”

Geoffrey Bourne's picture Geoffrey Bourne
2020 Best CIO Acceptance Speech (penned in 2010)

In the 2010 article, ThoughtWorks consultant Tiffany Lentz pens the speech a successful CIO might write ten years hence in 2010. She talks about the ways that agile principles had become the norm in development and spread beyond software teams in into IT and corporate planning and project execution.

Anupam Kundu's picture Anupam Kundu
Insights From Three Agile/Lean Product Development Thought Leaders

Here is what Mark Lines (Unified Process Mentors, Co-Founder) has to say:

The fact that basic agile concepts are so easy to learn, as well as the proliferation of certification courses with very little investment required has had both positive and negative effects. Certainly the mindshare of methods such as Scrum has exploded in our industry and people are excited about the benefits that agile can deliver in terms of elimination of waste and timely delivery of systems with immediate ROI.

 

Mark Lines's picture Mark Lines
Successful Agile Needs Teamwork

Agile embraces the concept of self-organizing teams but they are inherently unstable and are only successful when the ‘Leadership – Self-Management’ dilemma is understood and dealt with. Too much central control destroys agility, inhibits creativity and resists change. Too much self-management leads to chaos and anarchy and destroys a team. A successful Agile Team needs to operate as far along the continuum towards self-management as it can, without tipping over into chaos. You can’t just eliminate the PM role and say to a software development team, “OK, you’re now an Agile Team – you need to self-organize”. This is a recipe for failure, and one of the reasons why many organizations resist the Agile approach.

 

TechWell Contributor's picture TechWell Contributor

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