Process

Articles

Agile vs. Waterfall: The Blue Ocean Explains Why Agile Wins

The Blue Ocean Strategy gives important insights regarding how to create new market space in uncontested markets thereby making the competition irrelevant. This strategy can be adopted to explain the significance of agile methodologies as compared to the Waterfall method of software development.

Badri N. Srinivasan's picture Badri N. Srinivasan
A Psychology Framework That Will Help You Implement CM Practices

How does personality impact the implementation of industry Standards and Frameworks? It would seem that following the guidance in the IEEE 828 CM Planning standard is simply a matter of writing CM Plans and documenting your existing CM practices. The fact is that some people implement Standards and Frameworks successfully and others fail miserably. This article presents a popular and highly regarded psychology framework that will help you better understand how to implement Configuration Management.

Leslie  Sachs's picture Leslie Sachs
Kanban System Design

Karl Scotland explains that viewing kanban as a systemic approach leads to systems thinking. Systems can be thought of as being made up of elements, which interact to meet a purpose. They are more than the sum of the parts, and the system’s purpose is crucial in determining the system’s behavior.

Karl Scotland's picture Karl Scotland
Thoughts from Mid-Project

My team is in the middle of one of the hardest projects—we call them "themes"—we’ve ever tackled. We’re a high-functioning agile team that has helped our company grow and succeed over several years now—we “went agile” in 2003. Here’s one thing I know for sure: No matter how many problems you solve, new challenges will pop up.

Lisa Crispin's picture Lisa Crispin
Using Lean-Agile to Provide the Real Value of ALM

If Agile is going to make a difference to an organization, it must accomplish two things. First, it must assist us in being driven by business needs—not the development organization. Second, it must help us with the entire value stream—not merely part of it. Lean-agile practices presents us with an opportunity to reunite the business and software development organizations so our Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) can focus on value, not merely delivered software.

Alan Shalloway's picture Alan Shalloway
Acceptance Test-Driven Development: Not as Optional as You Think

The components of software processes work together in important and sometimes unrecognized ways. The removal of one of those components will affect the others. In this article, which originally appeared in the August 2010 issue of the Iterations eNewsletter, Jennitta Andrea takes a look at the value of acceptance test-driven development and the costs of making it an optional practice.

Jennitta Andrea's picture Jennitta Andrea
Agile Coach Performance Management: Measure Yourself as a Coach, Not as a Manager

The desire to control comes through loud and clear in the way most people’s worth is measured by their company’s performance management process. When it comes to performance review time, these controlling phrases crop up anew. Many successful agile coaches have been dismayed to learn that, despite the amazing results their teams produced and despite the new clarity and purpose that pervades the workplace, measuring their contributions still includes phrases such as “Herd the cats.”

Lyssa Adkins's picture Lyssa Adkins
Agile ALM—Opposites Attract

Agile and ALM are two terms that you don’t often see side by side. To most developers, agile means team interaction, customer collaboration, dynamism, and responsiveness to change. In contrast, ALM seems to imply the opposite of agile, with echoes of rigid procedures, inflexibility, and top-down process control. But are the agile and ALM approaches as contradictory as they first appear to be?

Mike Shepard's picture Mike Shepard
Enterprise Change Management in Agile Software Development

Agile software development is designed to thrive within even the most dynamic business and technical environments. All agile methodologies include integrated practices and processes that manage evolving requirements to efficiently develop a continuous stream of new software capabilities. However, what Agile does not address are changes related to enterprise support that falls outside the scope of the project work. Enterprise Change Management (ECM) provides a framework that addresses many of these missing factors.

Exploring the Subtle Differences Between Agile Paradigms

In recent years within the object oriented and agile community, several approaches to software design and development have materialized and are in use by professional software developers. Test-Driven Development (TDD), Domain-Driven Design (DDD), Behavior-Driven Design (BDD) and Feature-Driven Design (FDD) are some of the more well known approaches. While these philosophies all imbibe the classic agile principles of an incremental and iterative mindset to software development, they subtly differ from each other.

Nirav Assar's picture Nirav Assar

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