agile

Articles

Agile Is Cheaper, Right? Agile Is Cheaper, Right?

Kenneth Grant explains whether or not being agile is really as cheap for an organization as its proponents claim it to be. Agile’s relentless focus on business value and just-enough work can help teams identify waste—or poor return on investment (ROI) requirements—and gives them the opportunity to change it or leave it out all together.

Kenny Grant's picture Kenny Grant
Attacking Silos with DevOps Attacking Silos with DevOps

Many professionals, while having expertise in their technical niche, are sometimes less than perfect at communicating effectively with colleagues from other departments. This can result in departments failing to work effectively together; these departments resemble silos more than a collaborative and cohesive organization. This article will help you identify and understand some of the reasons why teams operate in silos and what you can do to change that.

Leslie  Sachs's picture Leslie Sachs
Following Agile By the Book Be Truly Nimble Instead of Just Following Agile by the Book

People often ask, “Can we apply agile to fields outside of software?” In this article from Marco Peredo-Saavedra, you can read how a construction project applied agile to its work with Marco as the product owner/customer. Take inspiration, and read his lessons. Then, go apply them!

Marco Peredo-Saavedra's picture Marco Peredo-Saavedra
Building a Backlog for Legacy System Changes

Kent McDonald writes that teams often assume that they cannot split their changes into small stories because the resulting stories would not provide value. What they fail to realize is that they can split these bigger changes into smaller changes and gain value by showing their stakeholders, getting feedback, and incorporating that feedback in their continued development.

Kent J. McDonald's picture Kent J. McDonald
Be an Effective Leader When Working Remotely Can a ScrumMaster Be an Effective Leader When Working Remotely?

Mariya Breyter explores the role of a ScrumMaster and whether or not one can work effectively when working remotely. If the ScrumMaster is not available to orchestrate product delivery, bridge any gaps, and remove any obstacles, a product will never be delivered—even worse, a wrong product will be delivered. In order to achieve this understanding, the ScrumMaster must show value to the team as a natural leader, no matter if he is onsite or remote.

Mariya Breyter's picture Mariya Breyter
A Software Team's Journey to Agile A Software Team's Journey to Agile

Did you ever wonder if a team needs some prerequisites before transitioning to agile? In this true story, John Lynch shows us the story of a team who teetered on the brink of dysfunction and then was able to create its foundation so team members could begin their agile transition.

John Lynch's picture John Lynch
What Position Do You Play in Software? What Position Do You Play?

Micheleen Merritt explains that as an agile coach, you need to take into account all of the participants of a team, not just the developers. If you aren’t acknowledging the quality assurance analysts, business analysts, and product owners, you aren’t coaching the whole team.

Mickey Merritt's picture Mickey Merritt
 A Team’s First Steps into Shared Ownership Snapshot: A Team’s First Steps into Shared Ownership

Karen Favazza Spencer writes of the time her team members had to modernize and expand the capabilities of their legacy system. In this situation, Karen took on the role of ScrumMaster, implemented several helpful agile techniques, and empowered the team to share leadership of the project with management.

Karen Spencer's picture Karen Spencer
How to Make Collocation Work for You How to Make Collocation Work for You

Gil Zilberfeld recounts his experience with collocation during his time at Typemock, and explains how collocation can benefit your team. In modern agile discussions, we struggle with how to work with distributed teams around the globe. The truth is that it’s easy to break stuff just by moving part of the team to the next room.

Gil Zilberfeld's picture Gil Zilberfeld
 Geographically Distributed Agile Team Primary Getting the Most Out of Your Geographically Distributed Agile Team

Shane Hastie and Johanna Rothman explain the challenges that come with distance, be it cultural, social, linguistic, temporal, or geographic. If you work to reinforce your collaboration habits every day, your geographically distributed agile team will thank you.

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