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Daily Standup Purpose: It’s All About Flow, Not Status

The Daily Standup (DSU) is a key ceremony in the Scrum Framework. When run effectively, it can ensure the Scrum team focuses on what’s important to meet the Sprint goal and commitment. When DSUs serve only as a status meeting, the value of the ceremony is lost.

Rich Stewart's picture Rich Stewart
Juggling The Life of an Agile Coach

For a long time, my colleagues were asking if I could articulate my days when I was engaged in coaching for agile transformation and how other coaches could prepare. Here are my thoughts.

 

Chandan Lal  Patary's picture Chandan Lal Patary
Team How the Scrum Guide Update May Affect Your Team

This article presents the author's view of what you need to reflect on and consider changing when using Scrum based on the November 2020 update to the Scrum Guide. It lists the changes and clarifications that affect each team or role defined in the Scrum Guide.

Vic Bartash's picture Vic Bartash
Top 10 Articles Top 10 Most-Read AgileConnection Articles of 2020

Agile is iterative, encourages collaboration, and is always looking to improve processes. The most-read articles from 2020 show that software professionals were looking to improve their agile teams and workspace.

 

Allison Scholz's picture Allison Scholz
Lessons as a Proxy PO

Sometimes a challenge can be turned into an opportunity. When our team learned that the business needed to pull their popular Product Owner to focus on another team, a sense of panic set in. There would be a job search that could and did take months. Who would help the team on their path to creating value in the interim? How would we operate? Over time, what seems to be a negative turn of events was turned upside down. 

Vic Bartash's picture Vic Bartash
Business analyst reaching across the table to shake the hand of another agile team member Fitting into an Agile Environment as a Business Analyst

It's the perennial question: Is there a role for business analysts in an agile environment? It stems from the fact that the Scrum Guide defines only three roles on the team: the development team, the ScrumMaster, and the product owner. Business analysts often feel like they have to justify their role. But the BA provides significant value. Here are three main ways they can make a difference on an agile team.

Frank Hamilton's picture Frank Hamilton
Agile team all putting their hands in for a high five How to Nail Agile Collaboration and Build Better Products

The rapid rate of technological change is forcing enterprises to reinvent themselves and provide more flexible approaches, so agile transformations are key. However, knowing that agile is important is one thing, but the ability to properly implement the main principles, tools, and techniques of agile is another. Let’s explore time-tested agile principles that will help your organization build innovative products that customers love.

Matthew Chen's picture Matthew Chen
Agile team member having a virtual meeting from home Agile Value Delivery: A Critical Component of Virtual Meetings

The recent surge in virtual meetings necessitates an entirely new set of desirable behaviors. But how do you keep participants engaged and material useful and on topic remotely, when it's hard enough to do that with everyone in the same room? The key is keeping value delivery front and center. Here are some tips and best practices for virtual meetings that will help you continue to deliver value.

Joe Schofield's picture Joe Schofield
Agile developers and testers collaborating Testing in Agile: How to Get Started

There is a lot of interest in organizations around a transformation to agility. However, the focus is usually on agile development, so it may not be clear how software testing is done in agile. If you're responsible for leading your testing teams, don't let them be left behind. Here’s how you can make testers part of the transformation, too—step by step, because this is agile, after all.

Balazs Schaffhauser's picture Balazs Schaffhauser
Agile team deciding how best to accomplish their work 6 Anti-Patterns Preventing Agile Teams from Self-Organizing

People have different cultural backgrounds, habits, beliefs, interests, capabilities, knowledge, skills, and temperaments. When put together on a team, they can’t always be governed by a rulebook to become self-organized. The dynamics among them have to be understood to recognize the anti-patterns first. Here are six anti-patterns that must be avoided and remediated to help teams move toward self-organization.

Ajeet Singh's picture Ajeet Singh

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