Give Positive Feedback Before Negative? Maybe Not

Many people are familiar with the build-break-build method of starting with positive feedback, then the negative, and then more positive. But is that the most effective way to convey your compliments and criticism? Recent research has been done to determine the most effective, and polite method.

Naomi Karten's picture Naomi Karten
Management Myth #6: I Can Save Everyone Management Myth #6: I Can Save Everyone

Not every employee is salvageable, and it’s almost always a case of cultural fit. If you’ve provided honest and open feedback and the employee can’t or won’t change, it’s up to the manager, or the self-managing team, to help the employee move on.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Reaching a Shared Understanding

Great things can come from teams that collaborate on projects, but reaching a shared understanding isn't always an easy task. With a variety of backgrounds and opinions, team members often face difficulty in coming to agreement. We looked into the causes for these roadblocks, and how to avoid them.

Naomi Karten's picture Naomi Karten
End and Then Begin Again

Shweta Darbha explains how teams can review their work and improve themselves after the completion of key projects or after they have adopted Scrum. Learn how your own team could benefit by following this practice after your next project.

Shweta Darbha's picture Shweta Darbha
 Have an Objective Ranking System Management Myth #5: We Must Have an Objective Ranking System

An objective ranking system is unnecessary when trying to determine an employee's value, and it can even be detrimental to collaboration on teams. Providing feedback, facilitating knowledge building, and allowing them to contribute are three key ways to help your employees excel in their roles.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Building Highly Productive Teams Building Highly Productive Teams: Factors that Influence Commitment-to-Progress Ratio

Aleksander Brancewicz addresses how to build a team that achieves a high commitment-to-progress ratio and presents the core skills and factors that influence this ratio.

Aleksander Brancewicz's picture Aleksander Brancewicz
Tips for a Productive Workday

Some days you leave work feeling as if the day went by without an inkling of progress or productivity. Other days, you leave feeling as if you conquered the world, with an internal spark of satisfaction and anticipating resuming progress the next day. So, what is it that makes the difference?

Nirav Assar's picture Nirav Assar
The Problems with Overachievers on Agile Teams The Problems with Overachievers on Agile Teams

Using an amusing medieval tale with a modern twist, Andrew Fuqua and Charles Suscheck tackle the dilemma of dealing with problematic overachievers in your agile team.

Management Myth #4: I Don't Need One-on-Ones

One-on-ones aren’t for status reports. They aren’t just for knowing all the projects. They are for feedback and coaching, and meta-feedback and meta-coaching, and for fine-tuning the organization. If you are a manager and you aren’t using one-on-ones, you are not using the most important management tool you have.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Embracing Change and Complexity Embracing Change and Complexity

Louis J. Taborda explains that in order to be successful, we need to be able to embrace both change and complexity while being agile. The more quickly we develop software and the greater the sophistication of the solutions we build, the more difficult it is to maintain agility.

Louis Taborda's picture Louis Taborda


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