documentation

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A pile of documents Slim Down Your Test Plan Documentation

Test plans are essential for communicating intent and requirements for testing efforts, but excessive documentation creates confusion—or just goes unread. Try the 5W2H method. The name comes from the seven questions you ask: why, what, where, when, who, how, and how much. That's all you need to provide valuable feedback and develop a sufficient plan of action.

László Szegedi's picture László Szegedi
Craeg Strong discusses agile documantation Best Practices for Lean Documentation: An Interview with Craeg Strong
Podcast

In this interview, Craeg Strong speaks about his upcoming presentation, meeting strict documentation requirements in agile, how agile documentation differs from traditional governance, the advantages and disadvantages to taking your documentation agile, and the art of a company turnaround.

Cameron Philipp-Edmonds's picture Cameron Philipp-Edmonds
Don’t Be Fooled Into Thinking Agile Means No Documentation Don’t Be Fooled Into Thinking Agile Means No Documentation

This is a common misconception of those inexperienced with agile, who choose this methodology on the basis of thinking that their project can be delivered more quickly and easily by avoiding documentation. But agile is not an excuse for skipping documentation. While some information will always need to be captured in written words, there are techniques that can be used to reduce documentation but will still give the customers what they want.

Leanne Howard's picture Leanne Howard
agile enthusiast Kanchan Khera Are You Using a Team Backlog in Your Retrospectives?

In this interview, Kanchan Khera and Bhuwan Lodha detail how adding a team backlog to your retrospectives can help your team go from good to great. With agile's core belief of continuous improvement, learn how the team backlog can help you get there.

Noel Wurst's picture Noel Wurst
Which Visual Models Do You Recommend for Test Design?

In this installment of FAQ, SQE Trainer Rob Sabourin answers one of the questions students ask him most often.

Robert Sabourin's picture Robert Sabourin
Agile Architecture Practices for Large Scale Agile Development

Although “agile architecture” may sound like an oxymoron to you, the reality is that a simple, elegant architecture is a key enabler of any successful system, particularly large scale ones. Scott Ambler describes agile architecture practices-at both the project and enterprise level-that form a middle ground between the extremes of big architecture up-front and outright hacking. Scott discusses agile modeling practices-initial architecture envisioning, proving an architecture with working code, and just-in-time model storming-that enable agile teams to benefit from architectural modeling without suffering the drawbacks of detailed design documentation. Beyond architecture, Scott introduces agile design techniques-continuous integration (CI), test-driven development (TDD), and refactoring-that build on and provide feedback to an emergent architecture.

Theresa Quatrani, IBM Rational
adzic cover Specification by Example: Collaborating on a Scope without High-Level Control

Understanding what the business users are trying to achieve can significantly help you focus the project on things that really matter. In this excerpt from Gojko Adzic's book Specification by Example, the author offers some tips for effectively collaborating on the project scope when you don’t have high-level control of the project.

Gojko Adzic's picture Gojko Adzic
"Excel-erating" Test Status Reporting

As a tester, you're often asked how far along your testing effort is, and when it will actually be done. This is one of the most difficult-and nerve-wracking-questions to answer, especially when a project has just begun or is nearing completion. While a tool is what's needed to help gather information and effectively answer this inquiry, many companies cannot afford to purchase or implement a complex, commercial tool. But there is a solution available in commercial spreadsheet products, particularly Microsoft's Excel. Earl Burba shows you how to use the logic and formula functions of Excel along with a combination of linked worksheets to develop an easy-to-use test status report tool.

Earl Burba and Jim Hazen, SysTest Labs
Simple Software Defect Categorization for Defect Prevention

Based on her experience with software development organizations at all five levels of the Capability Maturity Model (CMM), Barbara Kolkhorst outlines simple methods for documenting and categorizing defects and how to proceed with analysis for defect prevention. Learn how these simple methods can be implemented within your organization resulting in the prevention of significant numbers of software defects.

Barbara Kolkhorst, IBM
Software Documentation Superstitions

Do you need credible evidence that disciplined document reviews (a.k.a. inspections) can keep total project costs down while helping you meet the schedule and improve quality? The project documentation we actually need should meet predetermined quality criteria, but organizations are often superstitious about writing this documentation-and they let their superstitions inhibit their efforts. This presentation dispels the superstitions and shows you how reinforcements for improving the quality of your software project documentation-such as requirements, design, and test plans/procedures-can occur through disciplined document reviews.

Gregory Daich, Software Technology Support Center

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