The Latest

What are they Doing Down There? A CIO's Perspective on Agile Software Development[presentation]

What are the factors critical to the success of a CIO? How can a CIO consistently deliver business value? Do development teams, in general, and agile teams, in particular, understand how to contribute to this success?

Niel Nickolaisen, Headwaters, Inc.
Test-Driven Everything[presentation]

When you hear people talk about test-first or test-driven, you probably think of testing the code. Test-driven practices help developers reduce defects and increase the value in the code and the designs they deliver.

David Hussman, DevJam
From Concept to Product Backlog: What Happens Before Iteration Zero[presentation]

Many agile methodologies start with a product owner walking into a room with a pile of money and a stack of prioritized story cards and then telling the development team to start building a system.

Gerard Meszaros, ClearStream Consulting
Are We There Yet? Defining "Done"[presentation]

"Are you done yet?" The answer to this question may sink your career, your team, and your project. If you respond with a "yes," you may be forced to take on additional work you can't handle.

Mitch Lacey, Mitch Lacey & Associates, Inc.
Overcoming the Pitfalls of Transitioning to Agile[presentation]

If you've been trying to change your organization so that your projects are more agile, you may have encountered several problems-one is that it's difficult to have product management, senior management, and functional managers work together

Johanna Rothman, Rothman Consulting Group, Inc.
Seven Years Later: What the Agile Manifesto Left Out[presentation]

Although the Agile Manifesto has worked well to help many organizations change the way they build software, the agile movement is now suffering from some backsliding, lots of overselling, and a resulting backlash.

Brian Marick, Exampler Consulting
Agile Ethics and Values[article]

Why use agile methods? You've already heard enough about how agile allows software development organizations to do more with less. In this column, Michele Sliger offers a completely different reason—one that's often overlooked but nevertheless critical.

Michele Sliger's picture Michele Sliger
Handling Conflict on Agile Teams: What to Do When a Team Member Complains[article]

You've probably seen it on Agile teams: conflict seething just below the surface. Barely disguised disregard, sidelong glances, rolling eyes, words that halt conversation for an eternal heartbeat while people think, "Was that meant to be a put down? Did she really just say that?"

Lyssa Adkins's picture Lyssa Adkins
Infrastructure Envisioning[article]

I have seen many Agile projects, particularly those focused on brand-new product lines, struggle with getting their infrastructure up and running. Much of the reason is the time and effort that is needed to get infrastructure established far exceeds the time it takes to start development using an Agile method, effectively the first iteration. Typically the approach used to establish infrastructure is ad hoc and often not always aligned with the needs of the project. Therefore, a task must be identified to establish infrastructure. The question then is, how to best approach the establishment of infrastructure for a project using Agile methods? We do not want to build excessive infrastructure that may constrain us in the future yet we want to establish enough to keep us stable and productive.


Mario  Moreira's picture Mario Moreira
Accelerating Agile Files Accelerating Agile Development through Software Reuse[article]

One of the main attractions of agile methods over traditional heavyweight approaches to software engineering is their ability to accelerate the software development process. By minimizing superfluous activities and artifacts such as models and documentation and focusing developers' efforts on coding, agile methods increase productivity and reduce overall development time.

Unsolvable Conflict on Agile Teams[article]

Do you ever get the feeling that some conflict just can't be solved? The team members in conflict address the issue, it seems to go away but then it comes back. Maybe all dressed up in a new situation or with a different level of intensity, but the conflict is somehow familiar and you know that it has undoubtedly returned. If the team uses humor as a stress-reliever, you may even hear the conflict turned into a sarcastic half-joke, "OK team, just to put you on notice. Julie hates me again." Sounds almost like a marriage, doesn't it?

Lyssa Adkins's picture Lyssa Adkins
How Agile Practices Address Five Team Dysfunctions[article]

Teamwork, no matter the intentions at the start of any agile project, can be derailed by even the smallest factors. Learn how to identify the five dysfunctions of a team so that your team can address them and avoid letting them grind your production to a halt.

Tathagat Varma's picture Tathagat Varma
Decisions, Decisions, Decisions[article]

If you're working on more than one project at a time or if your managers are asking you to do so, it's time to make some decisions. Not every project should be started or finished, and certainly no one person or team should work on all projects at the same time. The organization needs to make some decisions about whether to commit to a project, kill it so it doesn't interfere with other projects, or transform it so it can succeed in a reasonable time.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Configuring CruiseControl for Continuous Integration Builds[article]

Michael Sayko introduces CruiseControl, which enables the implementing CI of Java applications. Using CruiseControl's build loop, dashboard, and build resultsJSP, Michael shows how any Java development team can receive added value through this open source tool.

Michael  Sayko's picture Michael Sayko
Are Your Pants on Fire, or Do You Suffer from Split Focus?[magazine]

Some schedule games—Split Focus and Pants on Fire—are the result of your management not making certain decisions about the project portfolio. Without those decisions, your project has problems. In this column, Johanna Rothman explains what you can do when the problems on your project are caused by your management’s lack of decision making.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman


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