The Latest

Test Is a Four-Letter Word[magazine]

Turn to The Last Word, where software professionals who care about quality give you their opinions on hot topics. This month, Gregory Pope offers alternatives to the dreaded "T" word.

Gregory pope12's picture Gregory pope12
Strangling Legacy Code[magazine]

Organizations saddled with legacy web applications often rewrite the applications from scratch. But what if an application could be rewritten a bit at a time by the same team that maintains it? Find out how one team "strangled" out legacy code with a new application—without having to start the rewrite from scratch.

Mike Thomas's picture Mike Thomas
Measurements that Matter[magazine]

No one starts a project with the goal of failing, but some metrics experts claim that 80 percent of software metrics initiatives fail. Just as your software project has goals for success, you should have goals for success in your metrics initiatives. Find out what you can do to better your chance for success.

Alan Page's picture Alan Page
Do-It-Yourself[magazine]

Projects collapse in a variety of ways and for a variety of reasons. Fortunately there are things you can do to stabilize and rebuild your project before the dust settles. With these expert tips and a little elbow grease, you'll have the tools you'll need to renovate almost any failing project.

Mike Cohn's picture Mike Cohn
A Crash Course in Scripting[magazine]

More and more software testing is becoming a technical activity—and that means programming. In the future, simply having domain knowledge won't be enough. Good craftspeople need good tools, and some of the most powerful tools in the tester’s toolbox today are dynamic programming languages like Perl and Ruby. If you aren't familiar with these languages, this article will help you get up to speed and start scripting in no time.

Chris McMahon's picture Chris McMahon
The Case of the Missing IF[magazine]

Grandma cooked her roast a certain way, and now you're repeating the process without knowing why you have to trim the ends off an uncooked roast even though the pan is adequately sized. Relic processes in many organzations fall trap to this mindset since the reason behind the action lost its meaning long ago. Lee Copeland calls these "IF ..., THEN ..." processes. When the organization loses sight of the IF responsible for the action, then you're left with what Lee describes as "a process without a context; a rule without a reason."

Lee Copeland's picture Lee Copeland
A Look at Selenium[magazine]

Get one reviewer's opinion of Selenium, a functional and acceptance testing tool for Web applications.

Grig Gheorghiu's picture Grig Gheorghiu
Your Job - Requirements = Less Value[magazine]

In this issue's Last Word, Dion Johnson calculates your job's worth when requirements are removed from the equation.

Dion Johnson's picture Dion Johnson
You Can Teach an Old PMO Agile Tricks[magazine]

Every manager has a story to tell. Find out how one management professional tackles a fictional dilemma. The story may be made up, but the solutions are tried and true. In this installment, Michele Sliger tells the tale of the movement of a Program Management Office away from waterfall toward Agile.

Michele Sliger's picture Michele Sliger
What Goes Up Must Come Down[magazine]

Writing requirements purely top-down or only bottom-up is risky to say the least. The devil's in the details, and those details are likely to be missed when working from a single direction. What if you could tackle your requirements from both directions by incorporating use cases and user centered design? Learn how balancing your approach to writing requirements can result in more detailed, pragmatic documentation.

Jeff Patton's picture Jeff Patton
Three You Should Read[magazine]

We're pleased to bring you technical editors who are well respected in their fields. Get their take on everything that relates to the industry, technically speaking. In this issue, our newest technical editor, Lee Copeland, discusses three books that have changed his life and encourages others to seek out literary inspiration of their own.

Lee Copeland's picture Lee Copeland
Putting a Face on Customer Needs[magazine]

So what happens when interaction designers are put to work on an Agile process? Meet "Dan Means," a system administrator persona developed to represent and emphasize customer requirements. Find out how one development team used him and other personas to blend interaction design and Agile development to deliver a product the customer really wanted.

David Broschinsky's picture David Broschinsky
If the Shoe Doesn't Fit: Agile Requirements For Stepsister Projects[magazine]

Once upon a time there was an Agile requirements process and an ugly stepsister project. This might sound like the beginning of a fractured fairy tale, but it's a reality for many projects that don't fit the criteria for an efficient, effective requirements process. Language barriers, large teams, and tunnel vision are all things that can turn your project from Cinderella to stepsister. Find out how you can overcome these obstacles and get your team back to "happily ever after."

Jennitta Andrea's picture Jennitta Andrea
Bringing Your Requirements Discussions Down to Earth[magazine]

Trying to communicate with businesspeople about requirements can make you feel like you're from another planet. Using concrete examples expressed as storytests to drive the development of a system can help bring you back into the same orbit. Discover ways to introduce this process on your next project.

Rick Mugridge's picture Rick Mugridge
A Look at PerlClip[magazine]

Need to get the scoop on the latest software tests and trends? You've come to the right place. Get one reviewer's opinion of PerlClip.

Danny R. Faught's picture Danny R. Faught

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