The Latest

Why Testers Should Participate in Early Reviews[magazine]

Do testers really belong in early reviews? For Michael Dedolph, the answer is yes! For that matter, he thinks more installers should be involved as well. Why? Testers and installers are usually involved in the "end game," so they add value by bringing that very different point of view to the review process.

F. Michael Dedolph's picture F. Michael Dedolph
Writing Effective Bug Reports[magazine]

Have you ever had a bug returned to you for more information? Have you ever found a critical bug only to have it deferred to another release? Elisabeth Hendrickson tells you how to write effective and informative bug reports that will get noticed.

Elisabeth Hendrickson's picture Elisabeth Hendrickson
Confessions of a Lapsed Academic[magazine]

After almost twenty-five years as a professor, Elaine Weyuker left academia for full-time work at AT&T. Here, she shares how industry and academia can both benefit from collaborating.

Elaine J. Weyuker's picture Elaine J. Weyuker
Learning Web Performance Testing[magazine]

Sue Bartlett and Meenakshi Rao highlight some common mistakes to avoid when starting Web performance testing, including trying to select a load-testing tool before evaluating your needs, and trying to outsource performance testing for a complex eBusiness application. They convey two important lessons: First, it's vital that you understand your architecture and your Web site's purpose; second, that kind of understanding is difficult to transfer to a third party.

A Look at T-VEC's Test Vector Generation System[magazine]

Before they started using T-VEC, David Statezni's group was manually creating and running requirements tests and separately creating and running code coverage tests. T-VEC's features allowed them to save time.

David Statezni's picture David Statezni
A Look at Testing Web Applications with eValid[magazine]

When Robert Sabourin set up a testing lab for a major e-commerce Web-based application, he chose eValid from Software Research, Inc., as the tool for use in functional, performance, and load testing of the application. The product did the job at a very reasonable price, and they were able to find some very important bugs well ahead of their target delivery dates.

Robert Sabourin's picture Robert Sabourin
The Downsizing of High-Tech America[magazine]

The success or failure of a downsized organization depends on the work force remaining after the storm. Before deciding to change jobs, survivors should carefully analyze their company's situation. Downsizing many be an indicator of poor economic peformance, or it may be just what the company needed in order to turn itself around. Employees who "weather the storm" may discover new opportunities for career advancement hidden among the ruins.

Stefan Jaskiel's picture Stefan Jaskiel
Checking out of the Burnout Ward[magazine]

Stefan Jaskiel helps you recognize the signs of job burnout (complacency, difficulty focusing, careless attitude, and helplessness), and offers some strategic interventions.

Stefan Jaskiel's picture Stefan Jaskiel
I am a Bug, and Refactoring[magazine]

Our editors recommend the books I am a Bug (a children's book written by a software development manager and tester to explain his job to his children) and Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code (by Martin Fowler, with contributions by Kent Beck, John Brant, William Opdyke, and Don Roberts).

Brian Marick's picture Brian Marick
Network Testing with Shunra's STORM[magazine]

STORM is a software-driven combination of hardware and software that recreates multiple, real-life, WAN links in terms of bandwidth limitations, packet loss, latency, jitter, and more–all in a local area network (LAN) lab. By providing a test bed that brings the WAN into a controlled and repeatable LAN environment, we can test and evaluate the performance and robustness of IP applications or devices before wide-scale deployment, or compare new technologies before field testing.

Ron Ioszpe's picture Ron Ioszpe
Book Review: Adaptive Software Development[magazine]

Johanna Rothman recommends the book Adaptive Software Development by James Highsmith. She says, "Highsmith shows the reader how to recognize when development practices need to change and how to acquire the skills to adapt. For a fresh approach to software development, be sure to check it out."

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman
Developing Your Professional Network[magazine]

Do you shudder at the thought of having to learn social etiquette in order to manage your professional network? Networking rituals do have to evolve to fit with new communication mechanisms. But the workings of the human psyche haven't changed, and you still need to learn the skills that are necessary to develop a network that can bolster your career.

Danny R. Faught's picture Danny R. Faught
A Detour Around Dead-end Bugs[magazine]

Show-stopping failures in Web applications are all too common. One serious but easily avoidable failure is the "dead-end" bug, where a user is left staring at a blank screen without any clue about what went wrong. Derek Sisson describes different types of "dead-end" bugs and shows how to avoid them.

Derek Sisson's picture Derek Sisson
The Power Loss Trap[magazine]

In order to be effective, Testing must co-exist on a level playing field with Development and Project Management. It cannot be subservient to them. A test lead's authority on a project springs from his or her projected sense of self-confidence in the role, and the Power Loss Trap undermines this authority. Here are a few commonsense ways to protect yourself.

Matt Leahy's picture Matt Leahy
On the Cost of Quality[magazine]

Technical Editor Brian Lawrence explains four types of costs of quality: prevention, appraisal, internal failure, and external failure.

Brian Lawrence's picture Brian Lawrence

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