burn down charts

Articles

Burndown chart Help Your Team Understand Its Iteration Burndown

A good key indicator for measuring how well your agile team is performing is the burndown chart. It’s a simple concept—as time passes, the amount of work to do decreases. Of course, there will be days when progress is not as expected or tasks end up larger than originally estimated. A burndown can help your team reset and keep stakeholders in the loop.

Dave Browett's picture Dave Browett
Genie Stop the Wishful Thinking: Software Estimation Reality Check

Daryl Kulak tackles the most common beliefs in software development regarding estimating, and shows us ways and methods to help developers deal with the demands of businesspeople.

Daryl  Kulak's picture Daryl Kulak
Tracking what Matters with Burn Down Charts

Burn down charts help agile development teams track sprint and release progress. The basic idea of a burn down chart is that the team starts with estimates for all of the tasks in the sprint, and then on daily (or more frequent) basis re-estimates the amount of work remaining.

Steve Berczuk's picture Steve Berczuk
The Agile-V Balanced Scorecard Metrics

Much has been written about the balanced scorecard methodology. Its goal is to measure desired outcomes and predict drivers of those outcomes. For a properly implemented agile team, this line-of-site measurement happens naturally and is controlled daily. This article suggests a simple and natural scorecard that provides accurate daily visibility of drivers and outcomes for an agile team focused on delivering business value to its clients.

Guy Beaver's picture Guy Beaver

Better Software Magazine Articles

Feel the Burn: Getting the Most Out of Burn Charts

Burn-down charts have become a popular project artifact, but too often, people accept the default chart from whatever project management tool they're using. What choices can we make about the chart format and scale that will help us create charts that answer the questions that are really important to us? And when the chart looks "funny," what could it possible mean?

George Dinwiddie's picture George Dinwiddie
Debunking Myths of Agile Development

Agile methods have made their way to the software mainstream in the last few years. As more organizations turn to agile development, its definition often gets obscured. Learn the facts behind five common agile myths, as Robert Holler attempts to dispel these misconceptions.

Robert Holler

Conference Presentations

Meaningful Metrics for Agile Teams and Organizations

The old adage “If you can measure it, you can manage it” also implies that meaningless metrics lead to meaningless management and harmful metrics lead to harmful management. When agile methods encounter metrics that were designed-and have organizational credibility-for non-agile processes and practices, the potential for harm is great. Niel Nickolaisen shares case studies and examples to describe the principles of meaningful-and meaningless or harmful-agile metrics. Meaningful metrics favor accomplishment over activity, measure processes rather than people, communicate clearly, and adjust to fit changing conditions. Filtering our agile metrics through these principles yields dramatic improvements in how we manage and deliver projects and services. For example, what positive and negative behaviors do burndown charts drive?

Niel Nickolaisen, Energy Solutions

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