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How to Hire a QA Person

This article provides a guide for hiring a Software Quality Assurance (SQA) specialist. It provides tips on what questions to ask and what problems to avoid in order to hire the right person.

TechWell Contributor's picture TechWell Contributor
Don't Just Do Something, Stand There!

Maybe you're the kind of person who attacks a problem as soon as it crops up. Many times, it's good to act fast. But for a different point of view, read this week's column by Don Gray, who advises us to "take ten" and evaluate a situation before making a response.

Don Gray's picture Don Gray
But I Don't Have Time!

Overworked software professionals sometimes skip things they know they should do, because they "don't have time." In this week's column, Karl Wiegers asks you to think about what you really mean when you say you don't have time, and he cautions you to take time to make time.

Karl E. Wiegers
a timeline for pervasive testing Maximum ROI through Pervasive Testing

Pervasive testing means getting the right people working together through the right processes at the right time for high-ROI testing. Through pervasive testing, all the ideas we've explored so far come together.Web site (as of late-July 2002).

 

Rex Black's picture Rex Black
The Importance of the Using Right Test Techniques

The choice of the right test techniques is critical to achieving a good return on the test investment. Some tests happen before we can even run the software. Some tests involve analyzing the structure of the system, while others involve analyzing the system's behavior. Each technique can involve special skills and particular participants, and might appropriately entail the use of tools-or not.

Rex Black's picture Rex Black
An informal Quality Risk Analysis for a Hypothetical Word Processor Key Risks to System Quality

Before we can build a high-fidelity test system, we have to understand what quality means to our customers. Test professionals can avail themselves of three powerful techniques for analyzing risks to system quality. Targeting our testing investment by increasing effort for those areas most at risk results in the highest return on investment.

Rex Black's picture Rex Black
Telling Our Story

Software professionals learn a lot from technical presentations and articles. But sometimes a well-told story can illustrate technical concepts even better, in an entertaining and memorable way. This week, Lee Copeland tells why it's good to be a software bard, teaching your audiences hard concepts in a decidedly nontechnical way.

Lee Copeland's picture Lee Copeland
Why Is Error Prevention Important?

The software industry historically has been plagued with an inability to release products that are adequately tested. Examples of poor quality in the software consumer market abound. From applications that can only be considered fully functional after a half-dozen "upgrades," to the frequent reports of damaging software viruses that reflect poorly on software security and stability, the software industry is consistently indicted for quality lapses. Put bluntly, much of the software in the consumer market isn't worth the cost of shrink-wrapping. This article serves as a rallying cry to bridge the gap between software quality efforts and other industry quality efforts.

TechWell Contributor's picture TechWell Contributor
Troubled Times

Market analysts say the economy is recovering from the recession. But it seems that every day we read about another company laying off workers and the tough IT job market. All this has Eileen Strider wondering, in this week's column, how you are faring and what kind of support you are both giving and receiving during these tough times.

Eileen Strider
Four Keys to Better Test Management

There seemed to be a disjoint between development and test groups. There were four things that became very obvious to me, that were necessary to get better organized:

  1. To have a common set of ground rules on the test progress, defect reporting, and verification.
  2. Be able to convey how is testing going on a frequent basis.
  3. Be able to determine what do I need to test and stand behind the reasons why.
  4. Maintain good communication with the technical leaders to help move the product through the development phases by being proactive rather than reactive.
Chris DeNardis's picture Chris DeNardis

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