Transition

Conference Presentations

Agile DevOps West The Hard Part of Every Agile Transformation
Slideshow

When it comes to an agile transformation, going through the motions of adopting a new set of attitudes, processes, and behaviors at the team level is easy. The hard part is building the enabling structures that allow agile to thrive, aligning the flow of work, measuring progress based on outcomes, and achieving communicable results that will resonate with stakeholders. This talk will cover the hard part. Mike Cottmeyer will explore the economic rationale behind going agile, considerations that will drive your organization’s change approach, what the fundamentals of an agile ecosystem look like, and the organizational patterns, governance models, and metrics necessary to establish that ecosystem.

Mike Cottmeyer
Agile DevOps West The Lord of the Rings: DevOps Edition
Slideshow

Modern software delivery involves lean principles, DevOps practices, and of course tools. Implementing those elements in harmony will necessitate a change in how teams operate—more specifically, it will require a change in how managers think about teams. If teams truly want to leverage the power of DevOps and become high-performing, how should leaders think about team construction? Using comical analogous reasoning, Joseph Ours will discuss the fellowship in The Lord of the Rings, the roles, the mission, and the skills team to extrapolate what can be learned. Joseph will take artistic license every now and then in order to make a point—because hobbits and IT are not a common analogy—but it will apply to leadership lessons he learned by analyzing each team member and their role.

Joseph Ours
Agile DevOps West Teaming in Agility: The Art of Excellence
Slideshow

Forming around an initiative to deliver productive outcomes can challenge the strongest of teams. It is even more difficult for individuals coming together during the transition. Often the responsiveness of the needs can be lost in process and system assumptions. Individuals under such a charge are left with a sense of being pawns in a chess match, making them feel less human. Teaming falters. Both the leader and the team member have responsibilities: The leader must unravel the complexity of the process, employ a human-first mindset, and foster safety and collaboration; the team member must be the innovative disruptor, embrace team membership, and fail forward. Both need to come together to serve the charge. Join Nabila Safdar as she shares stories of teams that came together to deliver a seemingly impossible charge.

Nabila Safdar
Agile DevOps West An Agile Fireside Chat with Bob Galen
Slideshow

Come get your questions answered by an agile expert! We won't have an actual fireside, but Bob Galen will be on hand to answer your questions and discuss the topics that are most important to you. Bob is an experienced agile coach with a broad range of knowledge on almost any agile topic—practices, leadership, or methodologies. And he wants to discuss whatever interests you. Bring your questions and be ready for a lively, interactive discussion.

Bob Galen
Agile DevOps West Escaping the 9 Circles of Agile Hell
Slideshow

Does it feel like you're toiling away in agile hell? Fear not—you don't have to be confined there for all eternity. Dave Bujard and Chris Stemen will describe the nine circles of agile hell, each an example of a problem that exists in many programs. They'll discuss the underlying issues that often are the cause and how to deal with them. Bring your smartphones—during the first five minutes, Dave and Chris will ask the audience to prioritize their pain points via an interactive app. During the presentation, they will focus on the six agile hells closest to participants' experiences. Threaded throughout the presentation, you will be engaged to poll your experiences as Dave and Chris convey specific, real examples of “escaping” from each agile hell. Learn to expand your toolbox of techniques to help your organization ascend from the agile underworld in simple, achievable ways.

David Bujard
Agile DevOps West The 7 Deadly Sins of DevOps
Slideshow

Do you know teams that are merely doing "cargo cult DevOps"? Near the end of WWII, the Allies had airstrips on many islands in the south Pacific. The natives on these islands noticed that when the Allies put the "coconuts" on their ears and spoke into the "banana," the gods would send down a magical flying creature with food and supplies. When the war ended and the Allies left, the natives put the coconuts on their ears and spoke into the banana, and they wondered why the gods failed to bless them, too. They didn't understand headphones or radio transmissions or that someone must be listening on the other end for that radio to do any good. A lot of development teams are similarly going through the DevOps motions without understanding how the things they are doing are supposed to benefit their teams and their organization. "Cargo cult DevOps"—adopting DevOps practices without understanding how they work—is Deadly Sin #1.

Larry Maccherone
Agile DevOps East Holistic Agile: Treat the Whole Company, Not Just IT
Slideshow

As agile methods find more global applicability, we are finding groups outside of IT that have nothing to do with technology or software development demonstrating success with agile methods. But the approach to the solutions they deliver are often catered to their own unique circumstances. The original Agile Manifesto, principles, and supporting frameworks were formed with software development in mind, but from a holistic perspective, a different approach is needed for enterprise solutions outside of IT. Robert Woods will show you how to translate the success seen in agile software delivery to parts of the organization that don't deliver technology as its core solution.

Robert Woods
Agile DevOps East Agile Program Management: Measurements to See Value and Delivery
Slideshow

Do you have measurement dysfunction on your program? Are you trying to measure teams and extrapolate each team’s status to the program? That doesn’t work. Teams have personal statuses, and you can’t add them together to understand the program state. But you can use a handful of program measurements that help everyone understand where the program is and where it’s headed. Instead of trying to “scale” measurements, take a new approach. Join Johanna Rothman to learn to use and share quantitative and qualitative program measurements that show everyone the program state. It starts with measuring what you want to see. This simple principle is so effective because it takes your needs into account before you decide on a metric to use. Next, we'll look at the scope. We’ll talk about why you want to measure completed features and how measure at this level can bring clarity to your project.

Johanna Rothman
Agile DevOps East Advance Your Agile Adoption with Lean Portfolio Management
Slideshow

As organizations begin to scale their agile adoptions from independent teams to a more organized "team of teams" structure, one of the challenges that is typically harder to address is budgeting and forecasting funding. The traditional approach of project-based annual funding doesn't allow for the effective integration of new information and market changes into the funding strategies. As organizations mature in their adoption of agile, they begin to better understand the need for changing the way they do lean portfolio management (LPM). Attend this session to get a basic overview of what LPM is and how it differs from a more traditional approach. You'll learn some typical problems that organizations encounter, hear from the audience about specific challenges they are having, and, finally, walk through a novel way of approaching these challenges.

Martin Olson
STARWEST 2018 Being More Agile Without Doing Agile
Slideshow

The most common requests Dawn Haynes gets as a consultant these days is to help testers transition to an agile development process, or to help testers be more effective in “agile-ish” environments. But Dawn recognises that transforming the process and the environment is not enough. Interestingly, the core answer to these questions starts with forgetting the process for a moment and focusing on yourself and what you’re trying to accomplish. Being agile starts with a mindset and an attitude that drive focus, approaches, and solutions. When you start there, the path to improvement can almost always be summarized as “being more agile”—which is surprisingly independent of whether your team follows an agile process. Join Dawn as she shares with you what it means for a tester and a test team to be more agile (whether or not you do agile) and what benefits you can experience if you decide to increase your agility as a tester.

Dawn Haynes

Pages

AgileConnection is a TechWell community.

Through conferences, training, consulting, and online resources, TechWell helps you develop and deliver great software every day.