defect reporting

Conference Presentations

How to Break Software

This course will provide you with some ideas to make your testing more effective. These ideas require self-study, practice, practice, and more practice. Take a look inside as James Whittaker teaches you how to break software.

James Whittaker, Florida Institute of Technology
Writing Better Defect Reports

Why is it that some testers get better responses from developers than others? Part of the answer lies in their defect reports. Following a few simple guidelines can smooth the way for a much more productive environment. That's because the objective shouldn't be to write the perfect defect report, but to write an effective defect report that conveys the proper message, gets the job done, and simplifies the process for everyone. It's important that you use this report to ask and answer the right questions. Kelly Whitmill gives you a quick mental inspection checklist you can reference each time you write a defect report. You'll walk away with information that can make a significant difference the day you get back to work, on a topic that's often overlooked in the industry.

Kelly Whitmill, IBM
Don't Just Find Bugs: Influencing the Defect Fixing Process

In many projects, finding defects is easy but getting them fixed quickly and correctly can be a big problem. As a test professional armed with test plans and automated tools, you can detect and report reams of bugs. But in the end, product quality is not judged by the problems found, but by the problems fixed. Until a time when robots fix defects, testers must convince programmers to research and fix problems. How do you make certain that the important defects you find are corrected properly? How do you get and keep the attention of management to sell them on the fixes you think are essential? In this presentation, Margaret Ramsey discusses the people issues in reporting and selling your defects to both management and developers.

Margaret Ramsey, Software Process Innovators
Bug Reports That Make Sense

Reporting a problem isn't enough. The more information you can provide the developer, the sooner the problem can be identified and fixed. Learn what developers need in a bug report, and how to create a good report versus a bad one. Explore the classification and severity of bugs and the importance of retesting before reporting.

Mary Decker, Aldebaron Financial Solutions
Bug Tracking in Chaos

Whether you call them bugs, defects, issues, or Test Incident Reports (TIRs), a tight schedule with unrealistic project goals requires you to record, track, and report on software problems quickly and accurately. Based on experience with projects operating in chaos, Marc Rene presents some real-world examples of how TIR data was collected, tracked, and presented to management for a quick and concise status of a project.

Marc Rene, GTECH Corporation
Interpreting Graphical Defect Trend Data

Evaluation of graphical defect trend data can dramatically increase your ability to predict current project quality, schedule milestone compliance, and provide historical data for proper test and development scheduling of later revisions. Jim Olsen will explore some of the complexities in analyzing graphic defect trending in this presentation (winner of the Best Presentation award for ASM'99). Learn ways to determine how much time establishes a trend, when the appropriate time to start taking data occurs, what type of data to track, and how to estimate the amplitude of defect oscillations at the end of the product cycle.

Jim Olsen, Novell, Inc.
Writing Better Defect Reports

Why is it some testers get a better response from developers than others? Part of the answer lies in their defect reports. But following a few simple guidelines can smooth the way for a much more productive environment. That's because the objective shouldn't be to write the perfect defect report, but to write an effective defect report that conveys the proper message, gets the job done, and simplifies the process for everyone. It's important that you use this report to ask and answer the right questions. Kelly Whitmill gives you a quick mental inspection checklist you can reference each time you write a defect report. You'll walk away with information that can make a significant difference the day you get back to work, on a topic that's often overlooked in the industry.

Kelly Whitmill, IBM
Bug Hunting: Going on a Software Safari

This presentation is about bugs: where they hide, how you find them, and how you tell other people they exist so they can be fixed. Explore the habitats of the most common types of software bugs. Learn how to make bugs more likely to appear and discover ways to present information about the bugs you find to ensure they get fixed. Drawing on real-world examples of bug reports, Elisabeth Hendrickson reveals tips and techniques for capturing the wiliest and most squirmy critters crawling around in your software.

Elisabeth Hendrickson, Quality Tree Software
When Test Drives the Development Bus

Once development reaches "code complete," the testing team takes over and drives the project to an acceptable quality level and stability. This is accomplished by weekly build cycles or dress rehearsals. The software is graded based on found, fixed, and outstanding errors. Development strives to increase the grades in each build--improving the quality and stability of the software. Learn how to use this "dress rehearsal" process to build team morale, develop ownership by the entire development team, and ensure success on opening night.

Cindy Necaise, MICROS Systems, Inc.
Bug Hunting: Going on a Software Safari

This presentation is about bugs: where they hide, how you find them, and how you tell other people they exist so they can be fixed. Explore the habitats of the most common types of software bugs. Learn how to make bugs more likely to appear and discover ways to present information about the bugs you find to ensure that they get fixed. Drawing on real-world examples of bug reports, Elisabeth Hendrickson reveals tips and techniques for capturing the wiliest and squirmiest of the critters crawling around in your software.

Elisabeth Hendrickson, Quality Tree Software, Inc.

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