The Role of the Agile Coach

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Summary:
One of the new roles introduced by agile software development is that of the team coach. Until agile came along coaches were confined to the executive suite or the sports field. As with any new role it takes a while before it is fully understood and scoped. Agile teams can, and do, exist without the coach role being filled but such teams do not necessarily achieve peak performance

One of the new roles introduced by agile software development is that of the team coach. Until agile came along coaches were confined to the executive suite or the sports field. As with any new role it takes a while before it is fully understood and scoped.  Agile teams can, and do, exist without the coach role being filled but such teams do not necessarily achieve peak performance.

Reports from Yahoo! suggests that coaches can make a significant contribution. In this study Scrum teams without coaching support increased their productivity by 35%, while those with Coach support recorded 300% or greater improvement.

What then is the Coach’s role? And what does a Coach do?
For some people the title Agile Coach is self-descriptive but for others it leaves the questioner none the wiser. So let me offer a definition: an Agile Coach help a teams or individual adopt and improve Agile methods and practice. A Coach helps people rethink and change the way they go about development.

Trainer and consultant
The Coach role is part embedded trainer, part consultant – specifically an advisor. Even the best Agile training courses cannot cover every detail or eventuality a team will encounter. The Coach is there to continue the training after the formal classes are over.

Having an onsite Coach will help team members put their training into action. Too often people attend training, think it’s good stuff, and then fail to incorporate their new learning into their daily work. This is particularly true when the organization sends mixed messages about change.

The Coach also helps teams apply Agile and Lean thinking to the specific environment and impediments they face. Working as an advisor the Coach can help the team adapt the methodology to their environment, and help the team challenge the existing environment.

Taken together these two sides make the Coach into an effective change agent - someone who is both motivating change and making it happen. That an organization is prepared to spend money on a Coach demonstrates they are serious about making the change happen.

So as well as helping the team execute the Agile vision the Coach may also help motivate the team to that vision. The Coach does this by painting a picture of how the Agile world works by telling stories and providing explanations.

Three types of Coac
While every Agile Coach brings their own approach to an assignment there are broadly three types of Coach. The first is technical, such a Coach works mainly with those cutting code and sometimes becomes fully integrated with the developers.

Technical coaches are likely to be found pairing with developers to help them apply test driven development, support developers in refactoring work, help improve the continuous integration system or other activities that are close to the code.

Technical coaches are experts in what they do, they aim to both transfer their knowledge and enthuse team members to try new approaches and techniques.

The second type of Coach is again an expert who aims to transfer their knowledge however the focus is not on technology but on process, management and requirements. Coaches like myself work with project managers, line managers, business analysts, product managers and others who are responsible for making the work happen.

Rather than working at the code-face coaching tends to happen in meetings and in one-on-one sessions. There is a greater focus on facilitating events that help create change and improvement.

For example, in addition to moderating stand-up meetings and planning meetings, I normally run retrospectives and “future-spectives”. A future-spective is an event which applies many of the

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About the author

Allan Kelly's picture Allan Kelly

Allan Kelly has held just about every job in the software world, from system admin to development manager by way of programmer and product manager.  Today he works helping teams adopt and deepen Agile practices, and writing far too much.  He specialises in working with software product companies and aligning products and processes with company strategy.

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