development

Articles

Developer working sustainably Cultivating Sustainable Agile Development

In agile development, we want to support a sustainable pace because we recognize that when we overwork ourselves, we tend to introduce defects that are more costly to repair than can be offset by any efficiencies we gain by putting in massive amounts of overtime. We should encourage a set of common standards and practices to help us build solutions that are more maintainable and extendable.

David Bernstein's picture David Bernstein
Mentor teaching a new developer coding skills Learning the Skills of a Professional Software Developer

We hire for programming language skills or framework experience, but these are the kinds of things that any developer should be able to pick up quickly. David Bernstein says we should be hiring based on talent instead, and mentoring developers to write code that can be maintained and extended more easily. These critical skills are best learned on the job, which is why mentoring is so valuable.

David Bernstein's picture David Bernstein
Metal gears 6 Steps for Succeeding with Test Automation in Agile

Lots of test automation efforts in agile software development fail, or at least do not maximize their potential. This article looks at two main reasons test automation may not live up to the expectations that testers and other stakeholders in the agile development process have, then outlines six steps to avoid falling into these traps. Here's how to succeed with test automation in an agile environment.

Bas Dijkstra's picture Bas Dijkstra
Person holding a smartphone 5 Ways to Tackle Mobile Development Problems Early with Scrum

Using Scrum for mobile application development can be difficult due to various challenges inherent to building mobile applications. Environmental dependencies, platform limitations, service outages, ownership and access issues, and short sprints can all derail your agile development. Here are some tips for overcoming these five common mobile application development issues early by using Scrum.

Ajeet Singh's picture Ajeet Singh
Gold-plated leaves Build Just Enough of a Feature with ATDD

Developers have a tendency to overbuild their code. This is frequently due to not knowing exactly when they're done and not knowing how robust a feature needs to be. Acceptance test-driven development (ATDD) is a great way to avoid this practice because when the acceptance test passes, the developer knows they're done building that particular feature.

David Bernstein's picture David Bernstein
Laptop with code on the screen Agile Development: Focusing on the Health of Your Code

In Scrum, the product owner and the ScrumMaster are supposed to drive sustainable development. But there's a third force missing from the formula: the health of the code itself. We often forget that our code is also a member of our team, and we have to be concerned about its health and well-being as much as any other team member. That means using practices to develop good code from the beginning.

David Bernstein's picture David Bernstein
Branching example Picking the Right Branch-Merge Strategy

A good branch-merge strategy facilitates processes among multiple developers and is the basis for any well-functioning DevOps pipeline that uses continuous integration. Let’s explore branching strategies, merging strategies, and how you can put them together in a way that’s right for your team in order to bring quality features to production faster.

Alan Crouch's picture Alan Crouch
Partially open computer showing a bright screen Software Development: An Industry of Amateurs

David Bernstein says the software industry is an industry of amateurs. It's a young field, and he doesn’t think it's yet graduated into a true profession. Here, David contrasts the software industry with other, more established fields, and he talks about what software professionals need to do in order for the industry to become accepted and esteemed.

David Bernstein's picture David Bernstein
A developer and a tester looking at each other warily Examining Cross-functionality Bias on Software Development Teams

Cross-functionality means having all the necessary people and skills on one self-organizing team. Unfortunately, the execution of cross-functionality is often biased. The main traps we fall into are misunderstanding the value of specialization, hero worship, and not “walking the cross-functional talk” as organizations. Let’s examine each of these pitfalls in the hope that your teams may avoid them.

Natalie Warnert's picture Natalie Warnert
A partially open laptop shows a colorful screen, photo by Ash Edmonds When Software Development Becomes a True Profession

David Bernstein describes the software profession as an industry of amateurs. He argues that it does not yet have many of the things that a true profession has, such as a defined path of entry or good apprenticeship opportunities. A big reason is that computer programming hasn't been around as long as other industries, but what else will it take for software to rise in the ranks?

David Bernstein's picture David Bernstein

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