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Cookbook The Agile Cookbook: Recipes for Enterprise Agile Transformations

Scaling agile across a large, enterprise organization is different from dealing with just a handful of teams. Though you have the same key ingredients, there are several recipes for how to put those ingredients together. Enter The Agile Coach’s Transformation Cookbook. You can whip up an organization-wide agile transformation by finding your own recipe for success.

Joel Bancroft-Connors's picture Joel Bancroft-Connors
Medal indicating the top ten agileconnection articles of 2016 Top 10 AgileConnection Articles of 2016

There is no question that agile has gone mainstream. If you aren't already using at least some agile methods, you soon will be. TechWell took a look at which topics the growing agile community cares most about and put together a list of the most popular AgileConnection stories and interviews of 2016. From failing Scrum teams and successful agile communication to facilitating feedback and simplifying user stories, we've curated the content you need to read as we head into a new year.

Heather Shanholtzer's picture Heather Shanholtzer
Tape measure Estimation: What It Takes to Deliver Consumable Value in Agile Projects

Releasing in small batches is a good way to achieve quick feedback in your sprints, but these pieces don't have all the features users need. Providing consumable value is turning those small bites into a meal, and it’s worthwhile to estimate what it will take to deliver that—asking, “What consumable value do we expect to achieve, what duration and cost should we plan for, and how likely is it that the plan will succeed?”

Andy Berner's picture Andy Berner
Multitasking Agile Techniques for the Multitaskers in All of Us

Multitasking can sabotage your productivity, but with all our different responsibilities, it's often a necessary evil. However, your work quality and quantity don’t have to suffer. These agile techniques can help you avoid interruptions, organize your to-do list, and regain focus after switching tasks.

Charles Cain's picture Charles Cain
Doctor holding prescription A Prescription for Your Team’s Agile Transition

When teams are transitioning to agile, making so many changes all at once can be hard. But just like with your health, in order to see progress, you have to commit, and when something starts working, you have to keep it up. Following this prescription should cure a team's agile ills and get its program on the road to recovery.

Allan Kelly's picture Allan Kelly
Team huddle Whole Agile Teams: Beyond Resource Efficiency

Which is better for your agile team: resource efficiency or flow efficiency? It may seem better to have everyone busy 100 percent of the time, but a little extra availability in everybody's schedule allows the team to able to respond to change. We need to get beyond “I do my job, you do yours” and instead focus on what the software needs to move forward.

Matthew Heusser's picture Matthew Heusser
Sign: Changes Strategies for Implementing Agile in Small Organizations

The experience of implementing agile in a company of thousands of employees differs widely from that of a company of hundreds. Although the risks can be greater, the rewards can be, too. If you work in a small company that is interested in transitioning to an agile workflow, consider these strategies for implementing agile in small organizations.

David Kirk's picture David Kirk David Thach
The Reason Scrum So Often Fails Agile Teams

The core of the Scrum framework for managing product development is the three key roles: ScrumMaster, product owner, and the development team. This triad is what makes Scrum so successful—when it works. However, it is the absence of these three roles that is the root cause of the majority of unsuccessful adoptions.

John Yorke's picture John Yorke
Agile icon 5 Ways Agile Testing Is Different from Traditional Testing

It’s the distinctions between agile and traditional software development approaches, as well as the adaptability of testers in these very different environments, that makes agile testing different from traditional testing. Agile demands more from its testers, and, in turn, it values them more, too. Let’s look at five main things that make an agile tester’s life different from that of a traditional tester.

Nishi Grover Garg's picture Nishi Grover Garg
Releasing SMURFS Instead of MVPs, Maybe We Should Be Releasing SMURFS

The term minimum viable product, or MVP, has come to be misunderstood and misused in many organizations. It doesn’t mean you should be releasing half-baked, barely feasible software. Instead, you should be thinking of your product’s capabilities as a Specifically Marketable, Useful, Releasable Feature Set—or SMURFS!

Matthew Barcomb's picture Matthew Barcomb

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