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Sparkly "2017" sign Top 10 AgileConnection Articles of 2017

Agile software development is mainstream by now, but people are still finding ways to experiment with agile. Measuring agile success with metrics, the debate over whether to use estimates, and improving predictability in Scrum were all hot topics last year. The rise of DevOps has given even more material for people curious to adopt the practice, so automation and "continuous everything" were also popular subjects.

Heather Shanholtzer
Gardening photo by Benjamin Combs Find Your Metaphor for Agile Software Design

How you think about software design can have a big impact on how effective you are when you do it. All of us have different criteria for success, and some of them aren’t even conscious. We have to figure out what resonates for us so that we make the right choices, and we can get a clue about the right choices for us by looking at the metaphors we use when we talk about software.

David Bernstein
Whiteboard with sticky notes for each day's retrospective comments Experimenting with Daily Retrospectives

Experimentation is a great way to unleash creativity, continuously improve, and see what works and what doesn't. When a team was tossing around the idea of doing daily retrospectives, agile coach Ben Kopel decided to guide them through some iterations on the process. Here, he talks about what the team did and what they gained from both the retrospectives and the quick feedback from experimenting.

Ben Kopel
Train off the track Signs Your DevOps Initiative Is Off the Rails

There’s lots of confusion about what DevOps is. This has resulted in the emergence of DevOps “antipatterns”—DevOps patterns of behavior that will not result in success. There are often clear signs that what you are doing isn’t going to work. This article delves into some of them in hopes you can avoid these mistakes and successfully implement DevOps principles and practices.

Jeffery Payne
Football plays Your Strategic Planning Should Be Agile, Too

What has agile taught us about trying to plan everything up front? It usually doesn’t work. So why does your company still use a yearly strategic planning approach that takes six months to develop and requires significant time and effort to pivot to new opportunities and challenges? We need to rethink strategic planning to incorporate design thinking, collaboration, and agility.

Phil Gadzinski
Requirements model Requirements Mapping Using Business Function Test Suites

On this team, testers were overcommitted, avoidable defects were surfacing, and documentation was hard to find. Worse, trust and morale were low. Upgrading tools was out of the question, so the testers decided to take matters into their own hands and create incremental change themselves. Here's how a team added a new type of traceability to its requirement test case world.

Balazs Schaffhauser
Changeable code The Value of Test-Driven Development when Writing Changeable Code

Writing changeable code makes it easier and more cost-effective to add features to existing software. Writing changeable code doesn’t take longer, but it does require paying attention to certain things when building a system. It's important to have a good suite of unit tests that support refactoring code when needed, and test-driven development helps you create independently testable code.

David Bernstein
Agile estimation points 5 Overlooked Opportunities in Agile Estimation

Agile story estimation gives the team insight into the level of effort for each work item, allows the team to assess each requirement’s relative priority, and lets the team refine and clarify story items. But there are even more benefits that can be gained from the estimation process. Try to take advantage of these five opportunities for growth when your team is estimating stories.

Ajeet Singh
Image of lock over code DevSecOps: Incorporate Security into DevOps to Reduce Software Risk

DevSecOps is a growing movement to incorporate security into DevOps practices in order to ensure flaws and weaknesses are exposed early on through monitoring, assessment, and analysis, so remediation can be implemented far earlier than traditional efforts. By failing fast with security testing, organizations reduce risk of a security incident and decrease the cost of rework.

Alan Crouch
Open agile workspace The Ideal Workspace for an Agile Team

If your agile team is all wearing noise-canceling headphones and stepping outside for conference calls, you have a problem. An agile workspace doesn't only mean putting everyone in the same room. The layout, configuration, and seating must be conducive to sustainable teamwork. Here are some tips about what an agile workspace is—and isn't.

Joel Bancroft-Connors

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