Agile SCM: It’s All Related

In this article, the authors the use of basic patterns that can help build a software configuration management process that works well with your agile development environment. They discuss how codeline policy, private work spaces, smoke tests, private system builds, integration building, unit testing, and regression testing all work together to enable you to maintain an active development line.

Approaching the Implementation of CM

When landing an airplane, the approach is considered quite important. If the approach vector is off even by 1%, the plane may careen off the other end of the runway. Also, if the approach is incorrect, effort such as fuel and time is unnecessarily expended and wasted, especially if circling must occur.

Mario  Moreira's picture Mario Moreira
Feature-Driven Development: An Agile Alternative to Extreme Programming

Feature-driven development (FDD) has the more traditional progression of a systems-engineering life cycle mode as compared to agile methods. It uses distinct phases in its iterations while still being highly iterative and collaborative. FDD does conduct up-front planning, design and documentation and relies very heavily upon domain modeling.

Brad Appleton's picture Brad Appleton
How to Merge XML Data with a Database

In his article "Data Crunching Tips and Techniques," Greg Wilson taught us how to translate legacy data into XML. In the second half, he explains how to merge new data into an existing database. Developers will always face these types of data crunching problems, and knowing the standard data crunching tools can save you a lot of time. Greg also shares the basic knowledge about relational databases that every developer should possess.

Greg Wilson's picture Greg Wilson
Agile Processes: Making Metrics Simple

IT organizations and, in particular, application development departments, are increasingly under pressure to provide performance and compliance metrics to justify annual spend. Unfortunately, many metrics campaigns collapse under their own weight. 

StickyMinds Editorial's picture StickyMinds Editorial
Issue Priority and Severity

There are several topics that can trigger near religious fervor in software developers--languages, indentation, and comments come immediately to mind. One of Peter Clark's personal favorites is the relationship of issue priority to issue severity in defect tracking systems. Just what the heck do all those levels mean, anyway? In this week's column, Peter describes a solution that his company devised to clearly define the characteristics of severity and priority and help them better understand how the two work together.

Peter Clark's picture Peter Clark
Release Management—Making It Lean and Agile

Release management is an awesome responsibility that plays a vital role in the success of a software development project. Releasing is often considered to be an activity that happens near the end of the process—a necessary evil, perhaps, but no more.

Robert Cowham's picture Robert Cowham
Approaching Parallel Development with Branch - Merge Strategies

Many times when managers first consider parallel development, it appears to be a very effective way to manage changes to concurrent streams of development. This is somewhat true if the project uses an SCM technology that allows for stable branching and establishes discreet project and maintenance branches. However, what is often forgotten is that while branching is a great way to separate code changes, at some point merging will have to occur. This article provides guidance for approaching and performing parallel development.

Mario  Moreira's picture Mario Moreira
Cases Against Applying Schedule Pressure

Do you think that by removing deadlines from a project a team will have enough time to create perfect software? Theoretically, it's possible, but in this column Mike Cohn explains that this theory might not hold against ingrained behavior. He recalls how several teams reacted when deadlines were lifted from the projects they were working on. Their only goal: to produce perfect software. But that goal inadvertently brought something to the surface, that old habits die hard.

Mike Cohn's picture Mike Cohn
How Much Work Can You Do—Developing and Managing Your Project Portfolio

Knowing how much work your group can accomplish—and how much it takes to complete that work—is critical to your success as a manager. Johanna Rothman explains how to ascertain your team's potential and how to use that information to define and manage your project portfolio so it doesn't manage you.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman


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