Articles

Icon showing one end to another Endgame Testing: Exploring Your Agile Product End to End

The main goal of endgame testing is to test the system end to end from the user's perspective. This should ensure continuity between components developed by different teams, continuity in user experience, and successful integration of new features. Endgame testing will often identify gaps that are difficult to discover inside agile teams, including flows across the product.

Doron Bar's picture Doron Bar
A pile of documents Slim Down Your Test Plan Documentation

Test plans are essential for communicating intent and requirements for testing efforts, but excessive documentation creates confusion—or just goes unread. Try the 5W2H method. The name comes from the seven questions you ask: why, what, where, when, who, how, and how much. That's all you need to provide valuable feedback and develop a sufficient plan of action.

László Szegedi's picture László Szegedi
value highlighted in dictionary Get Smart about Your Regression Tests’ Value

If you aren’t measuring the coverage your regression tests provide, you may be spending too much time for little benefit. Consider the value of your regression tests as you create and manage them. You need to be smart about the regression tests you maintain in order to gain the maximum value from the work put into creating, running, and analyzing their results.

Leanne Howard's picture Leanne Howard
Five ways 5 Ways Testers Can Mitigate Practical Risks in an Agile Team

Testers who analyze quality in every aspect of the team’s deliverables also have a responsibility to mitigate risks and practical issues that are bound to come up, and help the team succeed in their product as well as at being agile. Here are five such issues that testers can help the team alleviate or avoid.

Nishi Grover Garg's picture Nishi Grover Garg
Acceptance criteria checkbox Defining Acceptance Criteria for Agile Requirements

Acceptance criteria can be helpful in expanding on user stories in order to capture requirements for agile projects. However, acceptance criteria should not be a route back to long, detailed documents, and they are not a substitute for a conversation. This article tells you how and when acceptance criteria should be written and employed.

Allan Kelly's picture Allan Kelly
Test automation Test Automation in the Agile World

After decades of talking about test automation, the agile movement suddenly seems to be taking it seriously. You might be wondering what all the buzz is about. Sanjay Zalavadia talks about why test tooling is suddenly so critical, when teams should think of automating, and how to bring the change so that your team will embrace it.

Sanjay Zalavadia's picture Sanjay Zalavadia
Traceable Tests Guide Your Agile Development with Traceable Tests

Testing professionals who are learning about agile often want to know how they can provide traceability among automated tests, features, and bugs and report on their testing progress. Here, Lisa Crispin gives an example of how her previous team worked together to integrate testing with coding and helped everyone see testing progress at a glance.

Lisa Crispin's picture Lisa Crispin
Test Managers Survival Guide to Going Agile The Test Manager's Survival Guide to Going Agile

Joel Bancroft-Connors presents a survival guide for testers going to agile. Joel explains what happened when he had to make the switch from waterfall to agile. Welcome to the world of being an agile manager, in which your team is a top performer, doing more in the same amount of time as before.

Joel Bancroft-Connors's picture Joel Bancroft-Connors
Designing Scenarios for Agile Stories Designing Scenarios for Agile Stories

The needs to improve the time to market of a quality product and adapt to a changing business environment are driving organizations to adopt agile practices in order to be competitive in the marketplace. However, a project team is bound to face difficulties if it is not trained on the fundamentals of agile. Read on to learn how to design scenarios for agile stories using a structured framework.

Sharath Bhat's picture Sharath Bhat
Have You Used Word’s "Smell-Check" Features? Have You Used Word’s "Smell-Check" Features?

Terry Wiegmann writes about how Microsoft Word's features, like its spelling and grammar checkers, can help one identify agile smells—those signs that something might be wrong. While we may want to minimize documentation and the use of Word, we can mentally use some of Word’s features to sniff out some whiffs of smells.

Terry Wiegmann's picture Terry Wiegmann

Pages

AgileConnection is a TechWell community.

Through conferences, training, consulting, and online resources, TechWell helps you develop and deliver great software every day.