use cases

[article]

Who’s Using Your App? Examine Logs for Testing Insight

Summary:
When testing an application, have you ever thought to yourself, "I wonder who uses this"? Examining the app's logs can give you some idea. Logs are helpful for testers because they provide real feedback and insight into an application as it’s being used, as well as information that describes or can even help solve bugs. Here's how to use them to inform your testing.

When testing an application, have you ever thought to yourself, "I wonder who uses this"? Examining the app's logs can give you some idea. Logs are helpful for testers because they provide real feedback and insight into an application as it’s being used, as well as information that describes or can even help solve bugs. Here's how to use them to inform your testing.

About the author

[article]

5 Tips for Modernizing a Legacy Platform

Summary:

There are many reasons to consider modernizing your legacy software. But when doing so, it’s important to remember your customers who regularly use your product and to take their preferences, habits, and needs into consideration. Here are some practical tips to boost your chances of a smoother transition.

There are many reasons to consider modernizing your legacy software. But when doing so, it’s important to remember your customers who regularly use your product and to take their preferences, habits, and needs into consideration. Here are some practical tips to boost your chances of a smoother transition.

About the author

[interview]

The "Show Me the Money" Approach to Software Development: An Interview with Michael Harris

Summary:

In this interview, Michael Harris, the president and CEO of David Consulting Group, explains his five-step Value Visualization Framework. He discusses how he came up with the idea, how it can help your team right now, and its similarities to the agile methodology.

In this interview, Michael Harris, the president and CEO of David Consulting Group, explains his five-step Value Visualization Framework. He discusses how he came up with the idea, how it can help your team right now, and its similarities to the agile methodology.

About the author

[article]

Know Your Customers: They Can Help You Write Better User Stories

Summary:
Too many user stories begin, "As a user …" Who is your user? Or, more accurately, who are they? Improving your understanding of the types of customers who use your software lets you see multiple products where previously, there was only one—and identifying dedicated products will help you prioritize and accelerate delivery.

Too many user stories begin, "As a user …" Who is your user? Or, more accurately, who are they? Improving your understanding of the types of customers who use your software lets you see multiple products where previously, there was only one—and identifying dedicated products will help you prioritize and accelerate delivery.

About the author

[article]

Overcoming Cognitive Friction to Engineer Better Software

Summary:
The problems customers face are difficult to anticipate while developing software. However, looking at support issues can give a clearer idea about how to look for defects in the future. Sometimes users don’t know how to find certain information; other times, software doesn’t work as expected. In both cases, cognitive friction is at play.

The problems customers face are difficult to anticipate while developing software. However, looking at support issues can give a clearer idea about how to look for defects in the future. Sometimes users don’t know how to find certain information; other times, software doesn’t work as expected. In both cases, cognitive friction is at play.

About the author

[article]

User Story Heuristics: Understanding Agile Requirements

Summary:
Agile emphasizes just-in-time requirements rather than upfront preparation. The requirements person—be it the product owner, business analyst, product manager, or someone else—embodies the understanding of what is needed, and the user story represents the work that needs doing. This article details what user stories are (and what they are not).

Agile emphasizes just-in-time requirements rather than upfront preparation. The requirements person—be it the product owner, business analyst, product manager, or someone else—embodies the understanding of what is needed, and the user story represents the work that needs doing. This article details what user stories are (and what they are not).

About the author

[article]

Managing Acceptance Criteria Plans

Summary:

Some of the hardest and most crucial instances in any project execution are the user acceptance test phases. But having a thorough and clearly documented process for evaluating acceptance and exit criteria that you previously agreed on with the end-user will help you handle expectations and plan on results.

Some of the hardest and most crucial instances in any project execution are the user acceptance test phases. But having a thorough and clearly documented process for evaluating acceptance and exit criteria that you previously agreed on with the end-user will help you handle expectations and plan on results.

About the author

[interview]

Designing for Engagement: An Interview with Jaimee Newberry

Summary:

In this interivew, UX coach Jaimee Newberry talks about how to create a more engaging product for your users. She explains why it's so important to connect with customers on an emotional level, as well as how empathy and tone can change how a developer creates software. 

In this interivew, UX coach Jaimee Newberry talks about how to create a more engaging product for your users. She explains why it's so important to connect with customers on an emotional level, as well as how empathy and tone can change how a developer creates software. 

About the author

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