agile transition

Articles

Team of cyclists Successful Agile Requires a New Kind of Leadership

In an agile world, team members are empowered to make important decisions within the context of the behavioral architecture, without having to ask permission from supervisors or managers. But these supervisors and managers are coming from a lifetime of learning how to succeed in a hierarchical world, so they will need to leave behind those ingrained lessons. In order for agile to be successful at scale, leaders will need to change.

Jeff Dalton's picture Jeff Dalton
Coach guiding a team Empower Your Agile Team in 4 STEPs

New agile teams often start projects after some brief training on the Agile Manifesto and agile frameworks. But without additional coaching, these teams will struggle to deliver continuous value to their clients. Teams should be coached on how to tackle unexpected Situations, use appropriate Tools, conduct agile Events, and adopt appropriate agile Practices—four agile STEPs.

Ajeet Singh's picture Ajeet Singh
Arrows scaling upward 7 Key Factors for Scaling Agile in Large Organizations

Agile adoption has grown from a small number of agile teams within an organization to many agile teams, larger teams, and entire organizations themselves, bringing a new set of challenges and complexities. Regardless of the framework, some important factors play a major role in making large-scale agile adoption successful. Here are seven aspects you should consider when scaling agile across an organization.

Pooja Wandile's picture Pooja Wandile
Testing feedback loop 5 Key Factors to Achieve Agile Testing in DevOps

Part of the path to DevOps requires adoption of agile methodologies. What does it mean for testing when you switch from the traditional waterfall model, with a few long release cycles per year, to the agile model, with changes occurring every two weeks? Here are five key factors to achieve the agile software testing necessary in DevOps.

Denise Rigoni's picture Denise Rigoni

Better Software Magazine Articles

Cover of the Summer 2018 issue of Better Software magazine Great Big Agile: An OS for Agile Leaders

Following agile ceremonies may make an organization feel good, but that’s only a start. “Great big agile” requires leadership at all levels to focus on self-organization and empowerment as a universal framework.

Jeff Dalton's picture Jeff Dalton
DevOps and the Culture of Code DevOps and the Culture of Code

Migrating an organization to continuous integration requires adoption new processes, tools, and automation. DevOps relies on dramatic culture change to encourage total transparency and collaboration among all project stakeholders.

Patrick Turner's picture Patrick Turner
Agile Outside the Development Team Agile outside the Development Team

Most developers have tough encounters with business-oriented nondevelopers. An expert business analyst shows how an understanding of each others’ perspective will result in project success.

Ron Healy's picture Ron Healy
How Agile Has Shrunk Documentation How Agile Has Shrunk Documentation

Agile teams enjoy focusing their time on product features while keeping documentation to a minimum. But every team needs to consider what documentation is really needed. How much is enough?

Sandeep Maher's picture Sandeep Maher

Interviews

8 Ways to Ruin Your One-on-Ones: An Interview with Jason Wick
Video

In this interview, Jason Wick, senior manager at MakeMusic, discusses his STAREAST presentation about eight ways you could be making your one-on-one meetings completely useless. He discusses in depth what he feels is the number one way to ruin these meetings: holding back on feedback. He also offers advice on how you can educate your team leader to avoid the pitfalls that lead to ineffective one-on-ones.

Jennifer Bonine's picture Jennifer Bonine
Bob Galen Strategic Leadership in Agile: An Interview with Bob Galen
Video

In this interview, Bob Galen, principal agile coach at Vaco Agile, talks about the importance of getting rid of silos by breaking down the barriers of “them and us” and becoming “we.” He also discusses the need for agile managers to steer away from a tactical management view toward a more strategic leadership view. That means leading their teams by setting expectations and guidelines and being available to help if needed, but ultimately just trusting their teams to get the job done.

Owen Gotimer's picture Owen Gotimer
Agile Transformation 101: A Conversation with Adam Auerbach
Video

Adam Auerbach, VP of Quality Engineering at EPAM Systems, chats with TechWell Community Manager Owen Gotimer about how an inexperienced team can start its agile transformation, the value of stand-ups and retrospectives, and how to make remote teams feel more connected.

Owen Gotimer's picture Owen Gotimer
Chris Loder Getting Restarted in Test Automation: A Conversation with Chris Loder
Video

Chris Loder, automation architect at InGenius, talks about being a self-taught automation developer, why learning new skills is so important, and the synergy between manual testers, automation testers, and developers.

Owen Gotimer's picture Owen Gotimer

Conference Presentations

Agile DevOps East Holistic Agile: Treat the Whole Company, Not Just IT
Slideshow

As agile methods find more global applicability, we are finding groups outside of IT that have nothing to do with technology or software development demonstrating success with agile methods. But the approach to the solutions they deliver are often catered to their own unique circumstances. The original Agile Manifesto, principles, and supporting frameworks were formed with software development in mind, but from a holistic perspective, a different approach is needed for enterprise solutions outside of IT. Robert Woods will show you how to translate the success seen in agile software delivery to parts of the organization that don't deliver technology as its core solution.

Robert Woods
Agile DevOps East Agile Program Management: Measurements to See Value and Delivery
Slideshow

Do you have measurement dysfunction on your program? Are you trying to measure teams and extrapolate each team’s status to the program? That doesn’t work. Teams have personal statuses, and you can’t add them together to understand the program state. But you can use a handful of program measurements that help everyone understand where the program is and where it’s headed. Instead of trying to “scale” measurements, take a new approach. Join Johanna Rothman to learn to use and share quantitative and qualitative program measurements that show everyone the program state. It starts with measuring what you want to see. This simple principle is so effective because it takes your needs into account before you decide on a metric to use. Next, we'll look at the scope. We’ll talk about why you want to measure completed features and how measure at this level can bring clarity to your project.

Johanna Rothman
Agile DevOps East Advance Your Agile Adoption with Lean Portfolio Management
Slideshow

As organizations begin to scale their agile adoptions from independent teams to a more organized "team of teams" structure, one of the challenges that is typically harder to address is budgeting and forecasting funding. The traditional approach of project-based annual funding doesn't allow for the effective integration of new information and market changes into the funding strategies. As organizations mature in their adoption of agile, they begin to better understand the need for changing the way they do lean portfolio management (LPM). Attend this session to get a basic overview of what LPM is and how it differs from a more traditional approach. You'll learn some typical problems that organizations encounter, hear from the audience about specific challenges they are having, and, finally, walk through a novel way of approaching these challenges.

Martin Olson
STARWEST 2018 Being More Agile Without Doing Agile
Slideshow

The most common requests Dawn Haynes gets as a consultant these days is to help testers transition to an agile development process, or to help testers be more effective in “agile-ish” environments. But Dawn recognises that transforming the process and the environment is not enough. Interestingly, the core answer to these questions starts with forgetting the process for a moment and focusing on yourself and what you’re trying to accomplish. Being agile starts with a mindset and an attitude that drive focus, approaches, and solutions. When you start there, the path to improvement can almost always be summarized as “being more agile”—which is surprisingly independent of whether your team follows an agile process. Join Dawn as she shares with you what it means for a tester and a test team to be more agile (whether or not you do agile) and what benefits you can experience if you decide to increase your agility as a tester.

Dawn Haynes

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