agile transition

Articles

Back to basics Back to Basics: Use the Heart of Agile to Frame Your Agile Adoption

Somewhere along the way, agile implementations have gotten overblown and unwieldy. Managers and leaders look at all the models and frameworks and think agile adoption is too confusing or not worth the effort. To communicate what agile truly means, we have to simplify the message by getting to the heart of agile: collaborate, deliver, reflect, and improve.

Phil Gadzinski's picture Phil Gadzinski
Mapping Story points against hour Estimation

Hi everyone,

I have just taken over responsibility as a a scrum master and although i have worked under a scrum team before for a year but i always had difficulty in estimating according to story points. So in my first prokject as a scrum master, I took a risk and though to map story points against hours and it went very well. Here is how i mapped:

Points - Hours

1       2-4

3       4-8

5       8-16

7      16-24

9      24+

When i gave them a range the team was very comfortable so what i did estimated it according to the table above and in the end they all had a rough time frame then when and how they are going to complete it. I need to know that if it is feasible in long run?

Need very valuable comments on this one :)

Farhan Sabir's picture Farhan Sabir
Reshaping Agile Transformation Reshaping Our View of Agile Transformation

Transforming a software development team to agile may not go as planned. The real change requires a phased approach to earn agile acceptance. That mindset must extend beyond the team to the entire organization.

Jason Little's picture Jason Little
Encouraging growth Agile Managers: Trust Your Team and Encourage Innovation

In order to fully embrace agile and create an environment where individuals want to work together as a team, managers have to move from a role of dictation to one of direction and mentorship. Instead of making all the decisions, managers need to trust their team members and empower them to solve problems on their own, innovate, and fail—or succeed.

Lisa Rich's picture Lisa Rich Mic Riley
The Agile Manifesto Let the Agile Manifesto Guide Your Software Testing

Although its values are commonly associated with agile software development, the Agile Manifesto applies to all people and teams following the agile mindset, including testers. This article examines the four main values of the Agile Manifesto and reveals how they can bring agility to test efforts—improving quality for your team and your customers.

Nishi Grover Garg's picture Nishi Grover Garg
Selena Delesie Leadership Lessons to Bolster Your Software Team: An Interview with Selena Delesie
Video

In this interview, visionary speaker Selena Delesie explains how successful teams embrace specific principles, including listening deeply, believing people truly matter, having an addiction to learning, serving others, flowing through change, moving through fear, and following joy.

Jennifer Bonine's picture Jennifer Bonine
Agile team relationships Building Team Relationships as an Agile Coach

Only by creating a relationship based on trust can agile coaches be effective in aiding teams with an agile adoption. Joel Bancroft-Connors says the best start is actually to do nothing. Spend time observing the team first. This helps you understand the people and processes, which will help you determine the best course of action.

Joel Bancroft-Connors's picture Joel Bancroft-Connors
Learning soft skills Practice Soft Skills through Collaboration to Become Truly Agile

At the core of agile is the need to effectively communicate and interact with your team members, so it's important for all roles to practice soft skills. However, there is nothing soft about them. Soft skills are probably the most challenging thing you can focus on in your technical career. Rather than struggle to improve by yourself, develop these skills through collaboration.

Mark Kilby's picture Mark Kilby
Changing from time estimation to story points

I'm desperately looking for a bit of help! We are a small scrum team who recently turned agile (yay). The previous pm manager preferred using time estimations which was easy for pm's, not the agile-loving dev team. I want to teach my team how to switch to story point estimation and the major concerns of the team are - How do we explain cost to clients per sprint using points? Do we just take the budget total, divide into sprints (based on hours in a sprint) and cost this for a big project?

 

I have a very reluctant team so any help would be greatfuly appreciated!

 

K

 

Kirsty Fleming's picture Kirsty Fleming
success Achieving Success through Servant Leadership

Regardless of whether you are working with a stellar team or one that struggles, your style of management can influence the success of the project. Josh Dawson wants you to consider adopting servant leadership.

Josh Dawson's picture Josh Dawson

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