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Five Tips for Retrospective Leaders and Meeting Moderators[article]

Before you schedule or moderate another retrospective meeting, read this column by Esther Derby. Esther offers five tips that will help improve the productiveness of retrospective meetings. You'll also learn how letting the meeting participants run the conversation will solicit more feedback and ownership than traditional moderation methods.

Esther Derby's picture Esther Derby
Metrics that Motivate[magazine]

To implement a meaningful incentive system for your team, you need to select metrics that encourage the behaviors you need and the results you want. But first you have to decide what you need and want.

Linda Hayes's picture Linda Hayes
Follow the Process[magazine]

Building better software does not rely on methodologies. "Following the process" omits important human factors that ultimately lead us to success.

Lee Copeland's picture Lee Copeland
Simple Summaries Of Complex Projects[magazine]

How can we meaningfully summarize—in a brief status report without losing important details—the successes and setbacks our projects experience?

Payson Hall's picture Payson Hall
Google Web Toolkit: Writing Ajax Applications Test First[magazine]

In part two of the series, Daniel introduces Google Web Toolkit's testing infrastructure and demonstrates how to build an Ajax application test first.

Daniel Wellman's picture Daniel Wellman
Getting Agile With User-Centered Design[magazine]

Agile practices go a long way toward providing value to our customers. But in today's market, we must endeavor to adopt a more user-centered approach to create products our customers can't live without.

Darius Kumana's picture Darius Kumana Jon Dickinson
Cover or Discover?[magazine]

Excellent testing isn't just about covering the "map"–it's also about exploring the territory, which is the process by which we discover things that the map doesn't cover.

Michael Bolton's picture Michael Bolton
Keep Non-developers in the Loop[magazine]

Keeping QA members up to date on changes as they happen–through meetings, wikis, and email–can reduce the number of unnecessary bug reports and save you time and frustration.

Melanie Tayler's picture Melanie Tayler
Encapsulation and Vampires[magazine]

Encapsulation is more than just using the "private" keyword when defining a class. You need a boundary that keeps the vampires out.

Kevlin Henney's picture Kevlin Henney
Does Name Matter?[article]

The names we give to things can have a powerful influence on how we think about them and also on how we get others to think about them. In thiscolumn, tester, test manager, and consultant Fiona Charles examines names we have given to two essential roles in software development and explains why at least one of them is both inaccurate and a problem for testers.

Fiona Charles's picture Fiona Charles
Unit vs. System Testing-It's OK to be Different[article]

There are two distinct roles in many software projects that are involved with testing: developers and testers. Should they take the same approach to testing, or are there some principles that apply to only one of the roles? What should they do to coordinate their work? Danny Faught went through an exercise to compare and contrast and found that the questions he couldn't answer were as interesting as the questions he could answers.

Danny R. Faught's picture Danny R. Faught
Multitasking Is Evil[article]

Multitasking is often seen as a desirable skill—you can buy books or pay to attend courses that will teach you how to do it—but it is a surprisingly debilitating idea.

Clarke Ching's picture Clarke Ching
Keep Both Oars in the Water - Tips for Modeling Requirements[article]

If you hear that someone doesn't have "both oars in the water," you know he's out of control, he doesn't "get it," or he's going in circles. Why? To move forward in a rowboat, you need both oars in the water to steer and to gain speed. In this week's column, Mary Gorman explains how this concept applies to modeling requirements.

Mary Gorman's picture Mary Gorman
Infrastructure Refactoring[article]

Early implementations of Agile focused on brand new or newer product-lines. More recently, Agile is gaining acceptance in the legacy product space where the project teams are moving away from their company's traditional (aka, waterfall) methodology and moving toward an Agile approach. In these cases, the project team that begins to use Agile methods are typically inheriting an existing infrastructure that was constructed for a phased (aka, waterfall) approach.

Mario  Moreira's picture Mario Moreira
Transitioning to Agile in the Middle of a Project[article]

Every team transitions to agile in different ways, and this column is one of those stories. But what makes this one different is that the main character, a project manager, is transitioning her team to agile in the middle of a project. From this story, Johanna Rothman details a potential survival guide for any project manager and team embarking on the same journey.

Johanna Rothman's picture Johanna Rothman

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